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I got a new 47 tooth sprocket by JT sprocket. I took the old sprocket off and noticed that the new sprocket has a 1/16th or less indetion on one side. The old sprocket is flat on both sides. So when I go to install the new sprocket flat side down the bolts and lock bars won't fit in the indention. I will need to buy new bolts and some other kind of locking tabs. Has anyone else had this problem?



Thanks, Tom
 

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I've decided to switch out the OEM locking tabs and go with traditional graded bolts, washers, lockwashers, double nuts, and lock tite... Only thing that bothers me is the harware I bought is 13mm.
 

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Chuck the locking tabs and use nylocks or jam nuts...


I removed the locking tabs... couldn't find graded nylocks. I did find graded jam nuts, but went ahead and used double-nuts, lock-washers and lock-tite.



Going from 14/50 to 14/47 is very noticeable! It cruises waaaay easier on the pavement and has longer times between shifts, with a much easier going cruise at 50mph. I am a tiny bit concerned about the crawl-ability offroad though. I can tell I lost a little in that department. Some of the trails we run in Oregon get pretty technical and the TW in stock form can just put up stuff. I'm hoping to still have that ability. I'll post on here once I get a chance to run some trails and test it out.
 

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Think of it this way...going from 50 to 47 is 6%. This represents a 6% GAIN of available top speed, but the flipside is that you LOSE 6% low-end torque.

Considering that a NEW 200 checks in at a mind-boggling 13HP, and weighs-in at over 250 lbs, when you factor in rider weight and any farkles you have...6% could make the difference between buzzing up a hill or sitting at the bottom, looking up at the others!

My first experiment was with a 14/44 (12%) combination; great for cruising along flat roads, but it would bog down on any sort of incline! Riding logging roads was difficult (lots of second tries and running starts) and going two-up was a challenge. I eventually went back to the 14/50 stock gearing.



Recently I got bit by the bug again and tried a 14/47 combo, and while the riding was nice with only a slightly noticeable loss of low end power, there was that nasty harmonic to deal with! The loss of power was especially noticeable when riding two-up (we do that a lot!) and in the end I went back to the 14/50 OEM gearing and I will probably stick with it now.



I'm about 205...wife's around 140...that's quite a load for 13 horses!
 

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If the offroad ability is seriously hampered, I'll totally go back to 14/50. I'm really thinking about setting up a dual front and rear sprocket setup now. I can't find the old thread or any pics on this... Can anyone help? Thanks!
 

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If the offroad ability is seriously hampered, I'll totally go back to 14/50. I'm really thinking about setting up a dual front and rear sprocket setup now. I can't find the old thread or any pics on this... Can anyone help? Thanks!


mrgizmow/Gerry- developed a dual sprocket f/r system. Maybe he can help out.



I use a dual rear sprocket and single front - with additional chain section and two master links you could switch between the two sprockets quickly. See pictures below













Mike
 

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mrgizmow/Gerry- developed a dual sprocket f/r system. Maybe he can help out.



I use a dual rear sprocket and single front - with additional chain section and two master links you could switch between the two sprockets quickly. See pictures below













Mike


That is awesome! Is it custom made? Do you only use 4 bolts to hold it together??? wow......I'm gonna need more info on this. This would be perfect for me.
 

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That is awesome! Is it custom made? Do you only use 4 bolts to hold it together??? wow......I'm gonna need more info on this. This would be perfect for me.


This is an old solution from the 1960s. We used this on the old Trail 50s and 90s to ride single track.



This set was made by Rebel Gears in Tennessee.



As long as the engine does not have a lot of horsepower this solution works quite well; the 4 bolts and sprockets hold up well. I have two sets- the first set has over 6000 miles on it and going strong.



Since I pull a trailer behind the TW- I use the 55 tooth sprocket for crossing mountainous or hilly terrain or soft surfaces. East of the Rocky's I use the 47 tooth inner sprocket- ()- I remove the rear wheel, the 4 bolts, and a section of chain (between the two master links) and I'm ready to roll. It's an easy field solution that takes less than a half hour to accomplish.



Mike
 

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According to customer service @ JT the indentation goes toward the hub and the flat side of the sprocket is to the outboard side.

Use the stock locking tabs, or aircraft nuts, double nuts or locktite and regular nuts, hardened of course.

The indentation is for sprocket alignment because the factory fit bolts have a little play from side to side
 

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Think of it this way...going from 50 to 47 is 6%. This represents a 6% GAIN of available top speed, but the flipside is that you LOSE 6% low-end torque.
Considering that a NEW 200 checks in at a mind-boggling 13HP, and weighs-in at over 250 lbs, when you factor in rider weight and any farkles you have...6% could make the difference between buzzing up a hill or sitting at the bottom, looking up at the others!
My first experiment was with a 14/44 (12%) combination; great for cruising along flat roads, but it would bog down on any sort of incline! Riding logging roads was difficult (lots of second tries and running starts) and going two-up was a challenge. I eventually went back to the 14/50 stock gearing.

Recently I got bit by the bug again and tried a 14/47 combo, and while the riding was nice with only a slightly noticeable loss of low end power, there was that nasty harmonic to deal with! The loss of power was especially noticeable when riding two-up (we do that a lot!) and in the end I went back to the 14/50 OEM gearing and I will probably stick with it now.

I'm about 205...wife's around 140...that's quite a load for 13 horses!





May I suggest a 14/55 set up. The engine revs a little faster but so what. According the magazine article referred to in another post the redline 10,250 rpms. Even if it is 9500 rpms which seems to be the common consensus, 9000 rpms is still within operating limits. I have literally run my TW at 9000 rpms for extended periods, which according to the speed calculator is 64 mph, without any ill effects. I have done this on hot days where the temp was 100+ degrees F. Give it a try.
 

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I always loved the dual rear sprocket setup used on my '68 Harley Baha 125.



I forget what the ratio change was, but the sprockets interlocked, and 4 bolts held them spaced apart, or rotated 45° and dropped the large sprocket over the small. The rear wheel didn't need to be removed, and just a short length of chain was added / removed. There wher 4 bossed which dropped in holes or worked as stand-offs, along with the 4 bolts.



When I bought my '05 TW, the guy I got it from had changed to a 47t rear (I thought he told me it was 45), for road riding. I've not been happy with 1st gear off-road, and I have some trouble keeping 55 on big hills (I'm 240#). I changed back to 50t tonight. The TW had 850 miles on it when I bought it, about 1900 now
I am not looking forward to it screaming it's guts out, so I'll keep the speed down to 550-55 on the road, which is where it feels more comfortable anyway. I'm talking about handling, not vibration.



Hopefully I'll be happy! I really wish they put a 6th gear in...
 

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I always loved the dual rear sprocket setup used on my '68 Harley Baha 125.



I forget what the ratio change was, but the sprockets interlocked, and 4 bolts held them spaced apart, or rotated 45° and dropped the large sprocket over the small. The rear wheel didn't need to be removed, and just a short length of chain was added / removed. There wher 4 bossed which dropped in holes or worked as stand-offs, along with the 4 bolts.



When I bought my '05 TW, the guy I got it from had changed to a 47t rear (I thought he told me it was 45), for road riding. I've not been happy with 1st gear off-road, and I have some trouble keeping 55 on big hills (I'm 240#). I changed back to 50t tonight. The TW had 850 miles on it when I bought it, about 1900 now
I am not looking forward to it screaming it's guts out, so I'll keep the speed down to 550-55 on the road, which is where it feels more comfortable anyway. I'm talking about handling, not vibration.



Hopefully I'll be happy! I really wish they put a 6th gear in...


You'll like the 50 tooth...


Here's how my dual sprocket thread:

http://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/641-the-dual-sprocket-thread/page__p__4937__hl__+dual++sprocket__fromsearch__1#entry4937
 

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My advice to all is don't go with a 14/55 unless you are only going to be riding trails. I changed to a 54 when I first got the bike and did like it for a time- lots of pulling power but tough on the engine at full peg throttle. I went back to the 50 and was instantly underwhelmed with the performance. So I tried a compromise by going to the 52 and lived happily ever after. Plenty good for offroad and lots of punch going up through the gears (still looking for 6th lots of times). I can do what I want on anything except Interstates (I stay off them except for a couple of miles if necessary.).



I don't understand why I hear so often about keeping the revs down. On such a small engine the real power band is 7k rpms to about 8.5 to 9k. For my setup that means 50mph (7k) to 60 (at 8K+) and 65mph if I need it. I wear ear plugs and a helmet when I ride but I can still tell if the engine 'wants' to be running at any particular speed. I often find myself running at 55 to 58 with the engine happy as a clam and not beating itself apart. I always felt that the 50 was a mushy compromise between fire roads and highway riding. Come on, it's not a Harley engine where you have tons of torque at low RPMs. It needs to be ridden more like a two-stroke. Just hate to see some of you missing out on how fun this bike can be on the highway.



Dave
 
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