TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys! New tw owner this week Friday.

Buying my uncles that has 9k miles on it and it's a 92. Just looking for some quick tips on what to do/keep my eye on.

The tw hasn't been run a heck of a lot in the last 5-6 years since it sits at the cabin in upper Michigan.

I am planning on doing the supermoto plastic conversion from pro cycle. Anything else I should do??

Mainly going to be a city bike 25-35 mostly. Maybe a few times on the highway 65-70. Is the stock gears a pretty good set ratio?

Also going to get a pipe for it. Pretty sure on getting the fmf. The big gun or the dg any good? And can't be loud either bc cops hate that crap in my town but at the same time Harley's can rattle houses and get away with it, w/e haha.

Just lookin for quick tips!

Thanks,
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,309 Posts
Hello and welcome!

Keep the stock exhaust, anything else will draw unwanted atention and not add any performance. Great for a city bike, I don't know about 70 though, maybe 65 for a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The fmf sounds good and I know they don't add any power on these but we will see when I get it Friday what it sounds like. Yea I can get to the next highway goin 60 on the country hwy if need be. Also forgot to add what is the best to use for oil and filters too. I'm trying to save myself some time in searching all over for what people use in this post
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Yes. Use oil. And filters.

Any oil specified for 4-stroke motorcycles with wet clutches will do. Some diesel oils still will work, some won't, and you're on your own with that. Someone will pipe up "Rotella!" and some Rotellas work, some don't. Up to you to figure out which is which. There are only 12 or so, so it's really not that big a hassle.

As for filters, Yamaha replacements are paper elements, OEM was steel mesh. Lots of aftermarkets available, both paper and mesh types. Any will work, just make sure there are 4 holes in one end, not 2.

If you want a louder exhaust drill the stocker. Cheaper and makes better powerband than any of the aftermarket systems if you jet the carb to match.

Stock 14-50 sprockets make maximum advantage of the engine's limited capabilities. Redline is 82mph but the engine won't go that fast except off a cliff and no sprocket change will make it do so. Some people like a taller ratio to reduce vibration, but the engine can't pull it, fuel efficiency and performance suffer, and the clutch fails sooner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ok. Good thing I still have a case of oil for my ltz400. That oil will work for it, just gotta get some filters. Exhaust will prob be on the backburner for now unless if I find a used one. And yea was at most thinking of dropping one tooth on the front sprocket since it'll be 98% city and only highway would be 60.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,400 Posts
Welcome. First you want to get bike running well before any major mods such as an aftermarket pipe. An older bike that has not been regularly ran and maintained often will run much better with a clean carburetor and fresh fuel. Using search engine here for "Seafoam" or Lucas Deep Cleaner" will bring up many testimonials for curative powers of these carb cleaning solvents. A fresh new spark plug is a good idea too. Save your money for important safety stuff. Old tires are stiff with poor grip, how old are uncle's? Once she's going gotta make sure she's stopping too. Better to spend time cleaning ,and adjusting brakes than chasing a jetting problem caused by an aftermarket pipe.
I think you will enjoy your new bike a lot . I got comfortable with mine for a bit before deciding what my and TW's strengths were and what I wanted changed.
P.S. I ultimately decided I really liked quite exhaust note of stock exhaust when riding mellow so as not to annoy neighbors, but gets satisfyingly louder when on the gas. Better than barking all the time at all speeds. Plus you can chat from bike to bike without shouting.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
No sense gearing down--the TW trans has wide ratios compared to other bikes and 1st is a crawler gear. The stock 14-50 is the best all-around for most folks. It's one thing Yamaha got right.

Best bang for the buck is to jet the carb properly, which provides a satisfying boost in throttle response, cold weather starting, and slow cruising smoothness. Second best bang for the buck is a cam and springs as valve timing is the biggest factor limiting engine output, but you'll probably kill your ease of low-speed cruise. A bigger carb will then make a difference. The stock exhaust will easily handle such bolt-ons.

Next upgrade I would do is a new set of sprockets, o-ring chain, gasket, and all three seals. It's such a pain to change a countershaft sprocket you won't want to do it very often, so go ahead and do it all with an o-ring chain that will last 4-5 times as long as a stock chain. The Yamaha sprockets are good quality, and PBI and JT are good aftermarket choices. Rocky also makes a quality countershaft sprocket, but the bolt holes are bigger and you have to drill the retainer. Unlike other bikes, the TW has an oddball countershaft sprocket that fits practically nothing else so they are sometimes hard to find. The benefit of the o-ring chain is not just extended life, but the elimination of 95% of chain maintenance.

I've found the stock bars quite adequate for street riding, but if you plan to do any offroading a 2-inch higher bar will afford better control. Many brands of aluminum "ATV bars" with the same bend as stock other than height available. Any higher than 2 inches and you'll need new cables. Advantages are better control offroad and less vibration. I had drag bars on my pirate TW, which were great on the highway but tough on the wrists around town.

A good set of gel grips will help with vibration and improve grip. Might as well throw some brush guards on, too.

Since you are looking at street use only, the TW203 and TW204 tires would be my choice. They will look better with your supermoto theme and provide excellent traction on the street.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yea my plan was to order a whole chain and sprocket set right away, clean and lube up the brakes, drain the gas and fill her up with 91 ethanol free gas with a little bit of seafoam. I know it used to have knobby tires on it and yea if they are hard and dried up I'm put some street ones on. Yea eventually I should take her to get times and shimmed after a while too. If she runs for some reason she's goin for a ride Sunday bc it's supposed to be 50+ here finally
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,297 Posts
I can't recite the exact front and rear sprocket ratios but it is much easier to switch the rear than the front. I think going up to 15 in the front is close to going down to 47 on the rear. The stock 14t front with a 47t rear seems a little better for road work at the expense of low end grunt off road. Easy enough to return to the 50t rear if not happy.

GaryL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,663 Posts
Yes. Use oil. And filters.


Stock 14-50 sprockets make maximum advantage of the engine's limited capabilities. Redline is 82mph but the engine won't go that fast except off a cliff and no sprocket change will make it do so. Some people like a taller ratio to reduce vibration, but the engine can't pull it, fuel efficiency and performance suffer, and the clutch fails sooner.
Totally agree, tried 14/47 and the cons outweighed the pros IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,663 Posts
Yea eventually I should take her to get times and shimmed after a while too. If she runs for some reason she's goin for a ride Sunday bc it's supposed to be 50+ here finally
If you mean to get the timing checked and the valves shimmed, don't bother, the timing is permanently set and the valves use rocker arms with screw type adjusters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,297 Posts
Totally agree, tried 14/47 and the cons outweighed the pros IMO.
Same here. Tried the 14/47 combo and it was fine for poking around on the pavement and might have given me a few more top end MPH. Once I jumped off road it was immediately noticeable and gave the clutch a work out. Went right back to the stock 14/50 but if I was setting up a daily commuter with smooth tires for strict paved roads I would certainly consider this over messing with the front sprocket.

GaryL
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Well, newbie, you've got a lot to learn about TWs. You're making it a LOT harder than it has to be.

Street tires are Bridgestone TW203 and TW204. Great fun playracing. Wear those footpegs out if you're good enough.

New chain and sprockets as a set is a good idea. $12 gets you all three of the seals and well worth the investment not having to go back in for the next 25,000 miles, which you can easily expect on a street TW with an o-ring chain. Considering the age of the bike, cheap insurance.Cut your new chain with the 47t all the way back so if you end up liking the 50 better you won't have to piece a chain together. There is enough travel to accommodate 3 teeth difference.

Nix the high octane. Too much octane actually causes over-cooling near the end of the power stroke and kills flame front propagation, resulting in poor fuel efficiency and lack of power. Run 87 and jet the carb. Much more gain that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Mike - old riders versus new riders equals two different stories
I am an old rider - I would not spend nickle one on farkles until I had ridden the bike three or four thousand miles.
Your TW is a great street bike and can be so much fun. Digging into the mechanical side can be fun but make absolutely sure of the bike with things like cleaning the carb, changing the oil and filters and lubricating the existing chain before launching into changing sprockets or exhaust.
You have a sweet ride - when you thoroughly know it - then you can try some stuff.
Yamaha employs dozens of fully qualified engineers to give us good high quality products. The TW is one of them. Don't second guess them until you have a complete understanding of what you really have
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Totally agree with Polarpilot, 100%
That being said...I am running 14/47 with TW203 and TW204's and 100% street
That setup for me is working out very well. I can run 50-55mph and have alot left if I need it, but the pitch(sound) at 55 and my paranoidal brain cells don't want me to run her much harder than that
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Wise words, Polarpilot. However, we do know North American market bikes are lean to appease the EPA and a rejet is cheap and definitely improves starting, throttle response, cruise, and reducing engine heat. We know O-ring chains provide hours of riding over their lifespans that would otherwise go to chain maintenance, so upgrading is another no-brainer. As for t-count changes on sprockets, Yamaha got it right for 99% of riders. 15/47 is troublesome because the rpm drops between 3-4 and 4-5 become problematic. Been there, done that.

naluboy, it is impossible to run a TW hard enough to hurt it. A TW makes only 2/3 the horsepower as a TT-R 230 so WFO on a TW is only 2/3 the load on a TT-R with it's same family of engine. You'll float the valves and loose power before breaking the bottom end. Run a TW like you stole it, it won't hurt the engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Haha yea that's my bad, shoulda did more research before I said timing and shimming, my ltz just got done with all of that do I blabbed that.

And yea my plan on every vehicle I get car or you is all the maintenance thing are done right away then the fun stuff goes after.

And I'm glad to hear I'm getting into a great bike!!! Just got done putting a lift in my truck so it's gonna be a great week!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
"We know O-ring chains provide hours of riding over their lifespans that would otherwise go to chain maintenance, so upgrading is another no-brainer."

Thanks for this information. At what point (mileage) should the stock chain be changed and specifically what o-ring chain should be used for the TW?

Thanks,
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,297 Posts
"We know O-ring chains provide hours of riding over their lifespans that would otherwise go to chain maintenance, so upgrading is another no-brainer."

Thanks for this information. At what point (mileage) should the stock chain be changed and specifically what o-ring chain should be used for the TW?

Thanks,
Bob
Not an easy answer here! If the bike has 9K miles and the original chain and sprockets then it is time to change the works, front and rear sprockets and a DID 428 O or X ring chain with 122 links.
When you remove the side cover to get to the front sprocket you will want to have the new side cover gasket, both inner and outer O ring seals and the shift shaft O ring seal.

GaryL
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top