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Hey Gang,
Well, as some of you know, I purchased this '07 with only 587 miles on it, back about 3+ months ago. It's a long story but, in short, it needed lots of CPR to bring it back to life. After rehabilitation, therapy, and some new parts, this is a great little bike. I've since put about 510 miles on it. Well, after seeing and reading many threads and discussions on old tires I did some hunting. I got a brand new original rear tire the "Bridgestone Trail Wing TW34" from a member on here for a good price. I was torn between the Shinko 241 4.00 18 and the Kenda 270 5.10 18. I saw a few TW's with both and, I finally decided on the Kenda. I got that Kenda from Amazon in about 2-3 days.

Well, I decided to change them today. The front change-out wasn't all that bad. It's been quite a while since I did a motorcycle tire change. About the only issue I had was re-inserting the valve stem back into its little hole in the rim. Man, those tires have a stiff sidewall and, there's not much room for my fat little fingers to work that tube to get that stem in its place. But, eventually I got it. Then, forcing the tire the rest of the way back onto the rim, wasn't all that bad either. I put the front wheel back on and, tackled the rear. Again, not all that big a deal for removal of the tire. I recently got some wazoo nice tire spoons from Amazon and man, those things really helped out. Otherwise, it would have been done with SCREW DRIVERS, NOT GOOD!

Well, I must have pinched the tube in the rear 'cause, I was about to put the rear wheel back on the bike and could hear a ultra slight hiss. CRAP! So, back apart it all came. Good thing I had a new Slime patch kit hanging around. I patched it and put it all back together. No HISS this time. Got the garage all cleaned up and, headed out for a test ride.

WOW, is all I can say. I was used to riding around on 12 year old, rock hard (even though I only had about 15-18 psi in both) tires. With these new, soft rubber and, really deep tread tires, what a different bike. The person I purchased the rear tire from, has the Kenda 5.10 on his wifes TW. I recall him saying that she said it's a bit harder to steer. SHE was/is not kidding! On the test ride, which entailed nothing but city streets, it really felt as though the steering head bearings had all of a sudden, got tight. Now, I'm quite sure I'll get used to this new operating condition but, man, what a different feeling/ride.

But, I will say, that 5.10 x 18 Kenda sure makes that bike look like a Tractor. I like it. I can't wait to do a dirt/hill/rut/wash ride to see how it handles.
Scott

IMG_1545.JPG IMG_1546.JPG IMG_1548.JPG
 

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This is the video I watched a while back and it has made tire changes easy as pie!
Pay close attention to the 4:25 mark where he inserts the tube into the tire before installing it onto the rim....makes a HUGE difference!


The one thing I don't like is that he uses dish soap as lubricant...I've used dish soap to glue grips into place, so can you imagine what it does to tire beads?
Use proper tire-bead lube, unless it's an emergency in which case, anything goes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is the video I watched a while back and it has made tire changes easy as pie!
Pay close attention to the 4:25 mark where he inserts the tube into the tire before installing it onto the rim....makes a HUGE difference!


The one thing I don't like is that he uses dish soap as lubricant...I've used dish soap to glue grips into place, so can you imagine what it does to tire beads?
Use proper tire-bead lube, unless it's an emergency in which case, anything goes.
May I ask, what is wrong with dish soap?
Scott
 

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Of course you can ask...
As I mentioned, I've used dish soap as an ADHESIVE for grips...so if it will make rubbery hand-grips stick to steel, it can surely do the same to tires and rims!
I use nothing but bead lube for tires and I have NEVER had a bead that I couldn't break with minimal effort. I read all kinds of threads in this and other forums about guys who get a flat while riding, and need to drive a Jeep onto the tires to break the beads...ALL of mine break with hand tools, most often just by hand.

Of course, if you're out riding and need some quickie bead lube...use dish soap.
But afterwards, I would un-mount that tire, clean it up and remount it with proper bead lube.
 

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"ALL of mine break with hand tools, most often just by hand." -So curious how that works on a stock TW rear tire, much less a stiff ATV tire on a TW rear rim. Have you broken your rear TW's tire bead by hand yet?
 

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"ALL of mine break with hand tools, most often just by hand." -So curious how that works on a stock TW rear tire, much less a stiff ATV tire on a TW rear rim. Have you broken your rear TW's tire bead by hand yet?
I haven't owned a TW or needed to break the bead on the rear tire in about 6 years but on the last install, yes..the bead broke with long-handled tire irons. That tire was done by a local shop so whatever they used on the bead...made it easy.
I was quite surprised how easy it was to change out the rear tire...I had the shop do it the first time because I was intimidated by the task since it was the first tire-change I'd ever done on a bike. But when I did it myself a few years later (after gaining confidence and experience) I was amazed at how easy it was.
In fact, I'd say it was easier to do the rear tire on my TW, than it was to replace the front tire (Kenda 270 with a heavy duty tube) on my DR650.

I'll just put this out there and suggest that if you're having troubles breaking the bead on your tires...*maybe* it has to do with what you're using to install them.
At the risk of sounding like a broken record, I'll repeat: I've never had an issue breaking the bead on a tire that I've installed with proper bead-lube.
I would even use vegetable oil before I'd use dish soap.
 

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Been using Dawn dish soap and a little water on motorcycle tires for at least 25 years without a single issue. Not sure what soap you are using but it’s not sticky and I would never use it for grips.


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There's an old saying: "Do whatever you want with it..I don't care, it's not mine!"
If dish-soap works for you, then go ahead and use it...or Trailwing tires...or mineral oil...or Champion spark plugs...it's YOUR BIKE.

All I'm saying is that I believe there is a correlation between using soap (a known adhesive) and having difficulties breaking the bead at a later date.
 

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There's an old saying: "Do whatever you want with it..I don't care, it's not mine!"
If dish-soap works for you, then go ahead and use it...or Trailwing tires...or mineral oil...or Champion spark plugs...it's YOUR BIKE.

All I'm saying is that I believe there is a correlation between using soap (a known adhesive) and having difficulties breaking the bead at a later date.
I'm pretty sure until recently I remember every time I visited Les Schwabb with my dad through the 80s and 90s all they used were spray bottles with dish soap when setting beads and seating tires.

I agree with personal opinion, but I also believe in fact, that I'm having a very difficult time finding anything other than a few arbitrary warnings associated with cleaning cars by directly applying dish soap because of how it chemically impacts the clear coat. I would be interested in reading about negative affects of dish soap on rubber from a chemistry perspective. I just wasn't able to find anything linking bead issues to dish soap use...

As for tires, I'd buy it if you soaked your tires in a garbage can of dawn dish soap, I'd agree, that it's probably not good for the lubricant content of the tire since dish soap compounds are designed to cut and loosen chemical bonds of greasy and oily substances, but a 1-5 ratio of soap to water, for single use on a tire, I don't think we should send up any flairs.

Caveat: from the stories of people mounting the terrathons or other atv/utv tires... I'm not weighing in on that, you mad scientists can discuss bead lubricants used to get those beads to set.
 

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How about powder?
 

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I'm not going to get anal about it....all I know is what I've experienced, and all I said originally is that I didn't like that the fellow in the video used dish soap as lubricant.
You have to remember that a tire shop (ie: Les Schwab) will have powerful machines to break beads...when you're on the trail, you don't have that luxury.

Here are more than enough examples of people using dish soap (and water) as grip glue:
https://www.google.ca/search?as_q=&as_epq=dish+soap+as+grip+glue&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_nlo=&as_nhi=&lr=&cr=&as_qdr=all&as_sitesearch=&as_occt=any&safe=images&as_filetype=&as_rights=


...and my conclusion from this (as well as personal experience), would suggest that anything that can be used as glue, should probably not be used to mount something that will need to be removed at a later date.
But again, it's YOUR BIKE......................
 
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