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Discussion Starter #1
Hi - I’m new here. I’ve been spending some time on your site and appreciate all the good feedback and advice. Looking to do some quick upgrades to get better performance and response. The TW is a whole new bike experience for me. I’ve been away from motorcycles for a while recovering from an accident. My motorcycling history is primarily street biking and some off road dirt biking. I’m really comfortable on motorcycles but this one has got me a bit puzzled. I guess I’m looking for a little more zip or throttle response so to speak - but maybe I’m expecting too much. I guess I need to spend more time on the bike. I would appreciate some advice. Besides some adjustments, I need to buy fold down mirrors, hand guards, small rear bag and a new chain. Would a new spring and front shocks help? I would think it would. Tell me about pipes - does a new pipe and jetting really make a significant difference? Sorry - full of questions.
 

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There’s not a lot you can do to improve the speed, other than play around with the sprocket ratios – but if you do that, what you gain on one hand, you lose on the other

You can get a bit more response from the throttle if you play with the carb, though that’s not my area of expertise, I’m sure someone who can help you with that will be along shortly

Exhaust pipes – now that’s the way to go – if you like loud pipes that is. But although your ears will tell you you are going faster, in fact, you won’t be

If you’re on tarmac, tire pressure can help – as can tire choices

But first and foremost – get used to the bike as is – you may be pleasantly surprised

Judging it by your previous bikes is not the way to go ……

Welcome to the board ....
 

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Hi - I’m new here. I’ve been spending some time on your site and appreciate all the good feedback and advice. Looking to do some quick upgrades to get better performance and response. The TW is a whole new bike experience for me. I’ve been away from motorcycles for a while recovering from an accident. My motorcycling history is primarily street biking and some off road dirt biking. I’m really comfortable on motorcycles but this one has got me a bit puzzled. I guess I’m looking for a little more zip or throttle response so to speak - but maybe I’m expecting too much. I guess I need to spend more time on the bike. I would appreciate some advice. Besides some adjustments, I need to buy fold down mirrors, hand guards, small rear bag and a new chain. Would a new spring and front shocks help? I would think it would. Tell me about pipes - does a new pipe and jetting really make a significant difference? Sorry - full of questions.
Hey MotoFish, Welcome !

Where are you? Put it in your info so we have an idea of where you ride. What's the elevation? With that we would know what size jets to run as a good starting point etc. Usually you will find a 128 main jet as stock main in the newer style carb that you have (if it's an east coast bike, westies come many times with a 126 I hear) and both are good for most areas/elevations.

There are a lot of things that will help but nothing is going to make it seem like a "different bike". Regardless, you can do alot with it. Have you spent much time off-road yet?

For instance i'm at sea level and run a 130 main jet in my 2010 but would not run that at 5000 ft.

End of day adding "pipes" based on the feedback from many members has not seemed to increase the power enough to feel it in the seat of the pants, even with jetting. Going to a bigger main jet helps mildly in the upper mid to hi end but definitely lets the engine run cooler for me (as measured with a fluke) on the same afternoon where and how I ride. Your results may be different. I actually could tell without measurement that the engine was generally running cooler.

The TW is suited for many things, it's not a motocross bike by any means but I will take it many times where I would not take my other bikes. It has a purpose and suits it well.

So welcome aboard!
 

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Welcome to the forum. I like Purple’s advice. Get to know the bike first. Get it running as good as possible as is before you upgrade or modify.

It’s a 13(?) HP dual sport/ enduro that is good at a lot of things, but it’s never gonna be a freeway cruiser or drag strip champion.

My only experience is with stock exhaust, but many here have reported improvements with DG or FMF. I believe they both require carb rejetting. I don’t want to annoy my neighbors right now but would eventually like to try one. They’re pretty pricey.

I spent most of my money on RaceTech suspension upgrades because I can’t ride 50 feet around here without hitting a pothole. It made a substantial improvement when compared to my stock bike. Again, rather pricey. Cheers
 

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I spent most of my money on RaceTech suspension upgrades because I can’t ride 50 feet around here without hitting a pothole. It made a substantial improvement when compared to my stock bike. Again, rather pricey. Cheers
Can you share what you did, and your weight?

That's the biggest disappointment thus far is the ride. Not as supple as I'd expected, but then again, I'm sure they need fresh oil at a minimum. Would love something with some sort of rebound, compression, damping adjustability.
 

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Can you share what you did, and your weight?

That's the biggest disappointment thus far is the ride. Not as supple as I'd expected, but then again, I'm sure they need fresh oil at a minimum. Would love something with some sort of rebound, compression, damping adjustability.
the OEM springs are deplorable but buy a set of ProCycle front springs and the emulators are also worth the cost but at the very least the springs keep front front from sagging with just the weight of the rider standing still mine was 80% compressed up front.
 

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Welcome New Guys!
My method for optimizing perceived performance is to lower my expectations. Then the TW is perfect, it affordably does what it was designed to do.
Of course one can throw improvements on. Builder of one of my bikes swapped forks and shock for those from a Tri-Z and Blaster respectively, used stuff from the Yamaha parts bin. A few more inches of suspension travel really helps the bike not try to spit you off when hitting a bump or rut at speed. All these mods listed so far are easy to do, no seriously complicated machining.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks for the feedback. I've added my details in now. I'm in Indiana. I just need to ride the bike for a while and get used to. I'm not sure what I expected but know that it's a good bike. The feedback that you've provided helps with my confidence in my purchase. It's just very different than any bike I've owned. I've done plenty of off-road riding but not with the TW yet. I'll check in after I've put some miles on it off-road. Just need to make some adjustments so it fits me well. The bars are pretty low for me so need to adjust with risers or new bars. Planning to get a pipe for it soon, hand guards and wider foot pegs for sure. Hopefully with some more riding I'll be pleasantly surprised and feel better. And mine is a 2010 with 4k miles on it. White with red decals. All original. Thanks all - Wanda :D
 

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in addition to rejetting, be sure to shim the float. my tw used to require choke to start it... but it has never had to after being shimmed. i believe my mechanic used a small washer to accomplish the task.
 

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Hello Motofish, FIRST OFF - WELCOME TO THE TW200 FORUM and WELCOME TO THE TDUB FAMILY OF OWNERS!!!
Yes a few others here have already stated it and I will triple-confirm it, learn to ride the bike to 125% of the bike before your start thinking you need more speed. More speed on this bike is only going to get you into more trouble. Hoon-trouble and OTB-trouble! hehehehe Because of it's compact size, hoonin'around the hood, city, streets, sidewalks, anywhere is so easy and tempting, that you are potentially going to get into trouble! heheh HAVE FUN! The OTB portion is, the bike is already limited to six inches of travel, thus adding more power is only going to have you getting Over The Bars a lot quicker! I actually have the suspension on my TDUB pretty dialed in as much as possible without doing full fork/shock swaps, but the cost of swapping out all new suspension could exceed the purpose of this bike (for me). I have other larger dirt/dualsport and street bikes, but I have so much SILLY-STUPID-FUN on this little Yamaha TW200! You said you are "learning dirt" & "zip or throttle response" in your opening paragraph! Then learn dirt, not exploit power, save that for a bigger bike. Everything you will learn on the TDUB will apply to the bigger dirt bikes, at half the cost and half the skin as long as you don't go full OTB in the 'dub! You did not buy a TDUB for "ZIP!" Throttle response... OK, get an exhaust and TUNE THE CARB!!! There is your zip! Don't think you are going to hang with all the other dirt bikers or street bikers. Just ride your ride! You can ride with them, but always ride your ride!!! The TDUB will back-in, power-slide, pop wheelies, bunny-hop and anything and everything else you can think of except for massive table-tops! You can throw some baby Bubba-scrubs at it... BABY! Watch this video I just came across and he shows some good riding technique to learn aboard his Yamaha TW200/225(Japan Edition):


His "pop-pivots" and "ledge pops" are something I need to work on myself!

At the end of the day the TDUB = FUN FUN FUN!!! I grin every time I ride it!!!

Peep my thread as I have a lot of little things that I have addressed to make my TDUB suitable for heavy dualsport usage:
https://www.tw200forum.com/forum/trails-off-road-adventure-riding/46265-escapades-gcrad1-yamaha-tw200.html#post670169
 

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Nice vid GC.

Pownalite meant shim the needle of the carb not float. Lots of carb adjusting threads to check out.
 

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Congrats.
I would ride it for a month and be pleasantly surprised how much fun it is just plain stock. Then inch your way with the simple mods first like: adult foot pegs, handlebar risers if you need them, a more comfortable seat, etc. Stuff like that.

Then save the big "performance" (haha) changes for the Fall or Winter.
What a great time to get such a fun little bike! Enjoy.
 

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IMO, pipes are generally a waste of money and tend to cause reliability issues like poor starting, overheating, etc. You can go lower on the gearing to get a little better application of torque for off road, but that will sacrifice the already limited streetability. Also, if you are used to normal dirt bikes, the TW does not handle like one. It's not meant to be ridden fast and burn through corners and hit jumps. Think of it more like a classic Jeep -- slow and steady. There are things you can do to a TW to make it a fair bit more powerful, but I would say just get something with a bigger motor if you really need more power. The slower you can go (the lower the gearing), the better the TW is going to work.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks so much for all the reply’s and feedback. I’ve taken your advice, taken my time and been riding a good bit! Appreciate the TW for what it is and I’m hooked. Such a good thing that I found a deal on another one the we couldn’t pass up. So now we have twins - a 2010 and a 1995 the we just brought home tonight. A little clean up work on the 95 but awesome looking.
 

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