TW200 Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been looking to purchase a motorcycle and get into the sport. After a long while of researching and figuring what best fits my needs, picked up a 2018 yesterday. I've never ridden motorcycles and thought this was a good fit. Really just looking to get some advice/thoughts on things to think about as a beginner. I've mountain biked my whole life so when it comes to trails i'll definitely have to get used to a rig with an engine but i'm more curious about the street side of it. I do live and work in town so my commute is short and asides from riding the highway I wouldn't say park city is bustling with traffic. Thanks for the input in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Most important thing is to be vigilant at defensive driving on a motorcycle. Especially so in spring in cooler climates where car and truck drivers get a bit lazy at watching out for motorcycles in the winter months. Wear protective gear and have fun. Depending on speeds driven on a normal day, a lot of folks do a sprocket change to better suit their needs. I have one bike with a one tooth bigger on the front (15) and the other is all stock (14) and find either to be suitable but the taller gear of that 15 tooth front sprocket is noticeable in a positive way on the 55 mph roads and the stock gearing bike still works well too but revs a bit higher but is a tad bit better in low gear off road riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Welcome to the group Hammer27 and congrats on the new ride!

There is a mountain of knowledge here however seeing it is a brand new bike you shouldn't be needing the repair stuff for now, so then there's break-in, maintenance, accessories, upgrades (it is widely accepted the stock front tire is not great for off-road use, although it looks meaty enough I think it's really made of some sort of slime causing it to loose bite on grass & gravel). Have a look around and don't be shy to ask questions. Maybe let us know what part of the country you're in as well. Cheers!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,166 Posts
As your mountain bike riding experience will tell you, watch out for idiot car drivers – take nothing for granted – just because you now have a crash hat, it still hurts

Edit your profile to reflect your location – you will find many other TW riders in your area who will advise you on a variety of different issues – a long conversation face to face can tell you far more than I can

Get rid of the front tire, and swap it out for a Shinko 241 – the stock front is a temperamental beast that will lull you into a false sense of security, then face plant you without warning – swap it now, or make sure you have good dental insurance

From new, the TW engine will “barf” up a worrying amount of metal in the first 500 miles – this is normal, and of no concern (they all do it) – it’ll soon settle down

The oil filter is “washable”, and should be good for 10k if flushed regularly – the reason for mentioning this, is that we are still finding the wrong oil filters in boxes with the correct number. If you ask for an oil filter, they will simply pull the box with the correct number off the shelf – this is no guarantee that the correct filter will be inside the box. We have had top ends destroyed in 20 to 50 miles due to fitting the wrong filter – re-use the old if at all possible

These bikes are “cold blooded” out of the crate – but there is an easy fix – if this is an issue that bothers you or affects you, ask on here for help, and we’ll be happy to oblige

Don’t expect the TW to be a “crotch rocket”, its talents lie in other areas – there is little you can do to improve its performance; learn to appreciate it for what it is. What you have is a Mule, not a race horse – the difference is that a Mule can take you into places that a race horse can’t

Take your time to get used to the bike before you start changing anything (apart from the front tire) – otherwise you will end up with three grands worth of farkles, many of which will be bought on impulse – take the hint from the bike – sometimes slower is better

We’ll always be here to help you with any questions, so don’t be afraid of asking – if you read this http://tw200forum.com/forum/general-discussion/53810-site-search.html first, then research your question on the boards history, you will have either your answer, or a better grip of how to word your own question – but don’t hesitate to ask if you have any concerns, it’s what we’re here for

Welcome to the madness ……
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
Aside from getting the right filter, be sure to bleed the top end by taking out the little bolt near the top rear of the head on the right side. fire it up and wait till oil comes out. Shut down replace the bolt and enjoy a good ride. Some folks have not done this and lost the top bearings on the cam.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,989 Posts
Welcome to the forum!! :D A little reading might do you good...

http://tw200forum.com/forum/general-discussion/15822-what-tips-do-you-use-keep-yourself-safe-road.html

http://tw200forum.com/forum/general-discussion/55337-how-much-safety-gear-do-you-wear.html


Been looking to purchase a motorcycle and get into the sport. After a long while of researching and figuring what best fits my needs, picked up a 2018 yesterday. I've never ridden motorcycles and thought this was a good fit. Really just looking to get some advice/thoughts on things to think about as a beginner. I've mountain biked my whole life so when it comes to trails i'll definitely have to get used to a rig with an engine but i'm more curious about the street side of it. I do live and work in town so my commute is short and asides from riding the highway I wouldn't say park city is bustling with traffic. Thanks for the input in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,568 Posts
Welcome. Park City is awesome. Watch out for the tourists, lots to distract their attention from the road. If you don’t have some seasoned riding buddies to learn from, I recommend taking the advanced rider course if you haven’t already. Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,535 Posts
Yep! Whenever I see out of state plates in this resort town I expect them to do something stupid, like run a stop sign. :mad: (Not that the locals don't occasionally do that, but the odds are lower.)

As a brand new rider, I would recommend you get David Hough's book "Proficient Motorcycling". You can get a used older version cheap on Amazon. Many of us consider it our "Bible" and re-read it every spring to tune up our awareness level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I would like to welcome you also... This is a great place to find answers to just about any question you may come up with TW wise... Someone with way more experienced than I, as a pretty new TW rider also, will usually do all they can to help you out.

You have a great bike....
In addittion to added viligance while riding and that new Shinko 241 front tire, you may also consider a better designed set of foot pegs. The ones that come with the bike are IMO, way to small and hard to keep your feet securely in place on, as well as hard to get feet back in place on if you had to remove 1 or both of them. Larger pegs with more aggressive "Tractiion" will IMO, definately help your learning and handling level, while possibly improving riding confidence easier and faster.

You can find one example on Ebay for less that $20.00 . These are usually very usable and being used by many here. However, particular pegs usually reguire a very slight modification to 1 peg for to reposition return spring location for correct fitment.

Another quality set of foot pegs are the DMO brand "custom hand made" pegs. (These are not nearly in the price range of the Ebay ones).

These are the pegs I chose and with no regrets at all after a couple hundred miles on them.

Placerload, a forum member here, at times has these very high quality pegs as well as many other high quality and vastly improved up-grade parts in his inventory...... You may want to look him up here as you progress in making your new bike :) "Yours".
:D

excalibur
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I really appreciate everybody's 2 cents. I am looking forward to riding and I'm trying to get prepared to do that.

I know as mentioned I should swap front tire. From what I understand above it oesnt like to cooperate. If someone could elaborate that would be great.

Also, after my first couple rides what's imperative to do for maintenance?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,324 Posts
The front tire is fine on the street. Mine only lasted about 3000 miles. My TW was my first bike also. I rode slow in the dirt and got familiar with the bike. I think about what happened as a new rider I now think is funny. On sharp turns in the dirt I ran off into the bushes. I would brake way to short. I thought I had good balance but if I pulled a hand up the bike would move, I guess from bad balance. The motorcycle driving handbook had lots of helpful hints. I know in Texas you have to take the motorcycle driving course now to get your license. I didn't have to but it is a good idea. Also welcome to the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
....it doesn't like to cooperate. If someone could elaborate that would be great.

Also, after my first couple rides what's imperative to do for maintenance?
When I first got home with my T-Dub I immediately took a quick boot around my property and within a minute I felt the front end sliding out from under me. Now I did not go down as I was not going all that fast and I have ridden dual sports on and off for 40+ years. Like myself and others have said the stock front tire is Ok for road use but on gravel, grass, hard packed dirt and basically anything besides asphalt it just does not offer the bite needed. Now that being said there are members here who use the stock tire off-road successfully, perhaps they have a lot more skill than most of us, maybe somehow they got the elusive 1% of tires that are fine or maybe they're just lucky, who knows. The point is most here agree the front tire must go if you plan to venture off-road. As Admiral mentioned the tire most recommended is the Shinko 241 which you should be able to buy for about $50. So I would say you have 3 choices; 1, don't go off-road, 2, buy the 241 and be done with it, or 3, keep the stock tire until it surprises you not it a good way and deal with the consequences. BTW I am putting the 241 on my bike before it comes out of hibernation.

Now we know this is your first motorcycle and as a collective group we like to look out for each other. We can safely assume your skills at this point will be far less than most of us here and we are trying to pass on vital information to save you some headaches and grief.

As for maintenance, read the owners manual. I'm sure they must list some sort of break-in schedule for the bike. As a general rule you don't want to run it at top speed or revs to start and in general it is usually considered a good idea to vary the rpm's as you drive it which means riding at various speeds in various gears. Take your time get to know the bike and have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Appreciate the insight, guys. Just wanted to know a little more to better understand why. From what I can tell it is something I'm definitely going to do for my own safety and also my development. Pretty lucky to have a forum like this to stay on top of questions and get it straight from those who know. Thanks again hombres.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,535 Posts
...Also, after my first couple rides what's imperative to do for maintenance?
The first thing to do is change the oil at around 50 miles and clean the filter. I know, the manual says 600 miles, but do it anyway at 50, 150, and 500 or 600. Then you can go to 1,000 or 1,500 mile intervals. Clean the filter in kerosene and you will see why we recommend this. Re-use the OEM filter indefinitely and you will never have to worry about the dreaded wrong filter syndrome. Don't tighten the filter screws to the torque shown in the manual, only about 70 inch.lbs instead. Get a 1/4 inch torque wrench and learn how to use it. Download the manuals here:
http://tw200forum.com/forum/technical-write-ups/19851-downloadable-tw-owners-manuals.html

It's a good idea to eventually read through all of those technical write-ups even though you may not use them all. Fantastic amount of info there.

Check to be sure the clutch spring is hooked up correctly, mine wasn't.
Check the valve clearances at around 800 or 1,000 miles, mine were a bit loose on the 2010. I haven't checked my 2018 yet as I only have 160 miles on it.

When searching the forum, instead of using the forum search, use this in Google: site:tw200forum.com search term. Don't forget the space. For instance, site:tw200forum.com clutch spring will bring up a bunch of threads and pics of correct and incorrect placement of that spring.

Have lots of fun!! And take thing easy....it only took me 50 years to learn that. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Welcome! The TW is, in my opinion, one of the best bikes to learn the art of motorcycling! Nothing like low horsepower to teach you the ways of the dirt and it’s big enough to ride around town with as well

I’m the opposite of you...I started dirt bikes when I was very young and didn’t get into mountain bikes until I was in my 30s. The balance required and the nuances of off-roading required for MTB translate extremely well into the motorized version. Obviously they have their differences, but if you can fly through a technical trail on a pedal bike, you’ll do awesome on a dirt bike

Again, welcome and have fun!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top