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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks, I like to give a big thanks to Choppercharlie for helping me get here. Thanks again Charles! I am currently looking at a 2005 TW 200, and I have some questions. I would like to know where I can find specs on these bikes, such as stock sprockets. I've read some of the posts here, and I see most change the stock size. I am wondering how this bike will handle my weight 190lbs. I need a bike that can cruise about 50-55 without winding the motor tight all the time. I am told by the current owner that they changed the sprockets, I took it as they changed them to go faster, but then they said it will cruise about 45 mph. The bike looks good, looks like it been taken care of, as I said it's a 2005 with 4500 miles.



I will be doing mostly street riding, with some dirt roads thrown in. How rough will this bike be on the road? What is stock size sprockets? What will be a comfortable cruising speed? I guess just a overall on these bikes? Thanks for your help! Jeff
 

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Stock sprockets are 14/50 and the bike will easily handle 190 lbs.
 

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To cruise at 55 with the stock sprockets you will be wound out. But the TW doesn't mind running full throttle all day on the streets. There are 80/20 pavement/dirt tires available in the stock tire sizes which would smooth out the roughness of the stock 50/50 tire.



The TW also hauls me around no problem, and I am a bit heavier then 190.



http://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/75-service-and-repair-manuals/



That link has the download links for the repair manual which has all the specs you are looking for.
 

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I just got back from a shakedown ride on my new (to me) TW. It pulled me up a big mountain hill at 50 in fourth gear and didn't feel like it was working too hard. It wouldn't pull me up in fifth gear at that speed. That suggests to me that I am probably not yet in the happy place on the torque curve in 5th gear at 50 miles an hour.... or that the TW doesn't quite have enough power under the conditions (alcohol in the gas and at 7500 ft elevation) to pull me up that hill in 5th.



Either way it made it up!



On a straight flat road my TW seemed happy at 55 with stock gearing. I know I was smiling!



One thing to keep in mind, these bikes are a bit buzzy at any speed.
 

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i weight 240lbs. and with stock 14/50 can do 68-70mph. have gone 120 miles one way doing 50-55mph. comfortably rideing in tn. and ga.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Very good info guys, thanks a ton. I may go back and ride it tonight. Is the 4500 miles anything to worry about? It's a 2005, and they are asking $2200, the guy told me she may take $1700. I was thinking with the miles $1300-$1400?
 

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I think $1700 is a good price for an 05.
 

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Hey folks, I like to give a big thanks to Choppercharlie for helping me get here. Thanks again Charles! I am currently looking at a 2005 TW 200, and I have some questions. I would like to know where I can find specs on these bikes, such as stock sprockets. I've read some of the posts here, and I see most change the stock size. I am wondering how this bike will handle my weight 190lbs. I need a bike that can cruise about 50-55 without winding the motor tight all the time. I am told by the current owner that they changed the sprockets, I took it as they changed them to go faster, but then they said it will cruise about 45 mph. The bike looks good, looks like it been taken care of, as I said it's a 2005 with 4500 miles.



I will be doing mostly street riding, with some dirt roads thrown in. How rough will this bike be on the road? What is stock size sprockets? What will be a comfortable cruising speed? I guess just a overall on these bikes? Thanks for your help! Jeff


Hi, on my 3rd TW and was tempted on the first 2 to change the sprockets for less RPM at higher speed, but opted not to. Remember if you do that you will lose a little top-end power for hills and/or headwinds. Even though there are no hills around me (Eastern Shore of MD ... sometimes I wish there were) I think I'm glad I kept the stock sprockets.



I don't find any issue myself with the stock tires on the road either, which is 95% of my riding. I don't trust them much if the roads are wet, but then any bike/tire combo is touchy on wet roads. The only time I really notice the tire tread while riding is at very slow speeds there is a bit of a buzz. Hope to get a vid together soon of the 2012 taking some twisties and a variety of other stuff... the closest I can come to a hill is a pile of stones waiting to be used for construction... but I may ride up that small mountain if I don't get busted.
 

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48,000+ miles on Tdub, running sprocket sets from 14/55 (riding to 14,000+ altitudes in Colorado)to 15/47 (Saginaw TX, to Saluda NC, straight shot down the interstate). Tdub is currently wearing 15/52, which is just slightly taller than stock, but no common factors on tooth count. 15/52 allow a tad over 3700rpm at 30mph, which is about 90% of my riding these days.



The redline on a TW is north of 10,000rpm, which with stock sprockets, is ~78mph. Torque peak is 7,000rpm (~55mph), horsepower peak is 8,000rpm (~62.5mph), just about perfect for 55-60mph cruising. Running taller sprockets just lugs the engine and kills what little performance of which a TW is capable. Compared to other members of the same engine family, the TW200 is very mildly tuned. Running a TW wide open is about equal to running a TT-R 230 or XT 225 at 2/3 throttle. Use all the performance of which a TW is capable--you'll not hurt the engine doing so.



The bike is buzzy. It's a solid-mount 10,000rpm single. Get over it, or try some other proven buzz-killers, such as gel grips, aluminum bars, bar weights, gel gloves, etc.



Use a good oil blended for use in motorcycles. Your best bet is a true synthetic in 10W-40 or 20W50, depending on temperature. Fact is, a real ester-based synthetic will run 30-50*C cooler than a dino oil, making the use of 20W-50 unnecessary in all but the most extreme temperatures. An ester-based synthetic motorcycle oil will add more performance than changing sprockets, and cost less in the long run, and the better shifting will be a bonus. Jetting the carb will add more performance than changing sprockets, and cost way less.



If you plan on all street use, the TW203/204 tires and their clones are great. Add RideOn and wear will be reduced by 1/4.
 
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