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Discussion Starter #1
New to the forum. I don't have a tw200 yet. I haven't ridden for about 25 years and feel the TW will be perfect to get back into the saddle. There are lots of logging roads in my area to ride but most my ridding will be on pavement. The new bikes should be available at my local dealer around the end of March.

Do any of you folks carry survival gear when in the back country? I would hate to run out of gas on the other side of the mountains around here.

Gerry
 

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Welcome Gerry. While I don't have a need to carry survival gear where I ride, I can see where it would be a great idea for others. The fuel capacity is one of the biggest shortfalls of our trusty steeds. There are various methods of remedying that problem. I am going with a larger gas tank as I believe that the extra weight should be carried close to the frame between your legs and closer to the center of gravity. Others will chime in with their ideas and solutions. You have discovered one of the best forums on the net. The folks here are respectful, and extremely helpful. Be warned, it is addicting. Rubber side down, Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply Dave.

I'm also thinking along the lines of getting a Spot gps messenger. With it you can send out email messages to your friends or press the emergency button and get help no matter where you are in the world.

A few months back a friend of mine was riding an old logging road about fifteen miles from here. He came off his bike and broke his leg. He managed to get his bike started and although his bars were bent he managed to ride out to the main logging road. No cell signal where he crashed. He said a pickup truck passed him on the main logging road and stopped down the road. I don't know if it was pride or stupidity but he didn't ask for help and rode his bike back along the highway to home about 20 miles. He went to emergency the next day and lucky for him it was a clean break. So he will ride another day after repairs to his bike.

Lesson learned I hope. I doubt if anyone even knew where he was. He's a bit of a hermit and would not be missed for some time.

Gerry
 

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Welcome Gerry! I don't have a need for survival gear where I'm currently located/riding but if I lived in your neck of the woods, here are some items I'd be inclined to carry (beware, I've been known to overload my backpack when hiking):

My list of "MUST" carry if it's more remote (a good deal of this stuff could be worn in a backpack or shoved into a tool tube):

1. SPOT Satellite GPS Messenger - gives you a fairly inexpensive way to let others know you're in trouble and where you are.
2. A good "shake" type flashlight (never needs batteries) like this one: Nightstar jP LED shakelight magnetic shake flashlight
3. Space Blanket or two - to keep you warm/dry
4. Paracord - can be made into bracelets or whatever and used later to tie stuff up or help in creating a temporary shelter.
5. Small roll of "Gorilla" tape.
6. Good knife and a multi-tool.
7. Good (reliable) lighter
8. Water and/or water purification filter/tablets.
9. Mid to high caliber pistol (.357mag, .40, .44mag, .45/410 revolver, .50) - protection from bears, wolves, etc.
10. JB weld type epoxy stick.
11. Energy bar(s).
12. Small emergency medical kit (bandages, pain meds, hydrocortizone cream, antibacterial wash and ointment, needle and thread for stitches).

My list of "Luxury" carry:

1. Hatchet
2. Entrenching tool
3. Winch rope and pulleys - must understand mechanical advantage!
4. Extra socks
5. Comfortable shoes (I ride in MX boots when offroad).
6. Toilet paper
7. Poncho
8. Change of clothes
9. More food/water
10. Small "wind up" type radio - distract you from worry should you be waiting for rescue.
11. Small firestarter type log.

Things I would do to/for the TW (I'm not responsible for your decision(s)):

1. GET A KICKSTARTER
2. Install a sturdy rack (cycleracks) because you can use it to carry stuff or move the TW with it.
3. Put "ride-on" in tires.
4. Bring extra tubes.
5. Replace aesthetic/junk/non-functioning stock skidplate
6. Install barkbusters (saves your levers in a fall).
7. Bypass the kickstand safety switch
8. Bring a small air pump.
9. Put a fuel filter between the tank and carb.
10. Aftermarket gas tank
11. Folding shift lever


One last thing... Make sure you get the tool kit with your TW. Some dealers forget to put them in and some people never had one when they sell theirs used.
 

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Not too sure of the laws up there but I would absolutely have a Glock 40 or larger as the #1 survival tool. Satellite GPS or communicator sounds like a great tool as well. I normally go around 80 miles before I hit the reserve but this is highly questionable when you go off road just plunking around on trails. I think I would want at least a one gallon extra tank or a different Clark tank with far more capacity. You could easily sell a brand new stock take off tank for far more than a new Clark one will cost. Last but not least I would always file some sort of flight/ride plan with friends or family telling them the general area you will be riding in and an approx. time you should be back. That would be difficult if you are like me because I am subject to take just about any interesting trail I find along the way.

Get the new TW first and give it at least 500 miles of easy break in before you take off on deep woods adventures. Any mechanical issues will most likely show up in the first 500 miles so you don't want your carb or some dumb thing going south while you are far north.

GaryL
 

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Spot is excellent emergency beacon for an serious injury but you should be prepared to wait. Newer Family Service Radios have good range and might raise someone close to assist.First aid, painkillers, anti-inflamatories, spare warmth, fire starter, can help you limp home or endure while waiting for help. Maps, gps, situational awareness avoids getting lost. A few tools can help a self rescue should bike let you down. I always carry some rope , tape, zip-ties, flat fix. All depends on how remote you are going.
 

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I used a SPOT when I walked across the Sahara. It was new and novel then. It interfaced with Google Earth and allowed friends and family to follow my progress. But I never kidded myself, beyond displaying my route the only other thing it might have done was help family find my bones. That of course probably isn't the case here in the United States and Canada. Most likely someone would eventually come get you. It's an old rule but a good rule: never count on a rescue. Go prepared.
 

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All good advice above, even if we may sound paranoid. Just don't rely on technology for someone to come rescue you. Here in states many folks think a cell phone is all they need to save them.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys. That is all good advice and I don't think you are paranoid. I already have a pack with most of the equipment mentioned. First aid kit, fire starting materials, folding saw, paracord, small tarp for cover,,signal mirror, gps etc. I'm afraid the Glock is out. Very hard to get a hand gun permit in Canada and then only to carry from home to firing range. I would like to get the Spot because in these mountains you quickly run out of cell coverage.
All I have to do is take my boat up the inlet and turn at nine mile point and I'm out of cell coverage.

You might be interested in my xmas present this year. Just tried it in my yard so far but am looking forward to taking it out in the bush. It's a twig stove that produces it's own electricity and will charge a cell phone or rechargeable gps using a USB port.

I would upload a picture if I knew how.
Gerry
 

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Thanks guys. That is all good advice and I don't think you are paranoid. I already have a pack with most of the equipment mentioned. First aid kit, fire starting materials, folding saw, paracord, small tarp for cover,,signal mirror, gps etc. I'm afraid the Glock is out. Very hard to get a hand gun permit in Canada and then only to carry from home to firing range. I would like to get the Spot because in these mountains you quickly run out of cell coverage.
All I have to do is take my boat up the inlet and turn at nine mile point and I'm out of cell coverage.

You might be interested in my xmas present this year. Just tried it in my yard so far but am looking forward to taking it out in the bush. It's a twig stove that produces it's own electricity and will charge a cell phone or rechargeable gps using a USB port.

I would upload a picture if I knew how.
Gerry
What about a home defense style 12 gauge shotgun? Are they allowed?

GaryL
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi GaryL.

I doubt it. I have a possession only license. I can't even purchase a fire arm. Stuck with what I have and I'm no longer up on the regulations. I doubt if I can even take one of my guns out of my home.

Gerry
 

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Hi GaryL.

I doubt it. I have a possession only license. I can't even purchase a fire arm. Stuck with what I have and I'm no longer up on the regulations. I doubt if I can even take one of my guns out of my home.

Gerry
That is a sad state of affairs...sounds like New York City or Chicago....but at least you can keep what you have. My Taurus Snub Nose .38 with a couple dozen rounds may not stop a big bear, but it will sure put a hurting on anything that would come my way...and likely scare just about anything off...
 

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Hi GaryL.

I doubt it. I have a possession only license. I can't even purchase a fire arm. Stuck with what I have and I'm no longer up on the regulations. I doubt if I can even take one of my guns out of my home.

Gerry
No offence Badger and I do feel for you. I would not live in a state or country that denied me my God Given Right to protect myself and my family. It is one thing, not that I agree, to restrict concealed weapons in some populated areas. To restrict any and all weapons so that a fellow out in the deep woods has no means of protection at all would be reason enough for me to leave. I live just a little over an hours drive from NY City and I refuse to travel in to that dump for that exact reason. Outside of that cities limits I am still free to travel fully armed just as life should be.

GaryL
 

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hi guys just thought i'd chime in on the gun restrictions, you are allowed to cary shotgun year round for crow ,coyote, nusance wildlife ,in nova scotia. but you have to have it in a case when transporting it in or on motor vehicle.unloaded as well.there are also distance regs. 200yds from a dwelling,unlessyou own said dwelling.mostly common sense stuff. a POL still lets you to buy ammo and hunt. you can easly get aqiisition lisence by taking safty course for firearms.no big deal.you cant have a sawed off shotgun tho,i belive 20in. is min .length for barrel .i'm not sure about pistol grip stock.in BC you might not be allowed to carry in the provincial parks anyway best to check with your local DNR office.enjoy your bike ,keep shiny side up,drive it like u stole it.
 

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HI amigo!!!

I am glad you want to get back on 2 wheels. FOr me safety comes in numbers, as mention, tec can only get you so far, but a friend could do the other stuff that not tec will not.

Have fun!!

Damasovi
 

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I spent a lot of time in Alaska carrying pepper spray. Always thought as a courtesy to the bear I should have had a speedloader pouch on my belt with a salt shaker.
Yeah Borneo, I am a firm believer there is plenty of room for all these creatures, right alongside my mashed potatoes!

GaryL
 
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