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Discussion Starter #1
I have been wanting to hike Notch Peak. It's located out in the middle of BFE in Utah near the Nevada state line. Not far north of Hwy 6/50, also known as the loneliest road in America. This excursion would be primarily on dirt roads using the TW loaded for bear. (Bobcats and Coyotes, but no bear where I was going.) This was the first time I used my Versa Pak saddle bags and Cyclerack pannier supports. I used the base of some cheap plastic trash cans to give some rigidity to the bags. seemed to work pretty good.

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After using some cheap bungie cords to help 'secure' the top bag, I stopped by Rocky Mountain ATV/MC in Payson and bought some Rok Straps to do it right.

I found a double track dirt road that followed the Union Pacific train tracks south towards Delta, Utah. Some recent rains created greasy mud in the low spots of the trail that made the Dub handle like it was on ice.

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Discussion Starter #2
Funny, not a human in sight for miles and miles of dirt, then I get caught at a railroad crossing by the longest train in history. This was right after making my way through a herd of sheep grazing nearby.

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The first of many never ending dirt roads. At least they weren't too rutted. I could keep a steady 40-45mph without feeling squirrely.
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My 4 gallon XT225 tank sure gives me peace of mind when I'm on unknown roads and trails in the middle of nowhere.

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Discussion Starter #3
There's a crazy place called Baker Hot Springs where you can stop and soak in a natural hot spring. The catch is that the water is hot enough to scald you, so a nearby cool spring has been piped in via PVC pipe so as you soak your bones, you can regulate the temperature of the water by adding more or less cool water to the mix. Just don't wear clothes that you care about. There were abandoned towels and other sundry unmentionables that were forever stained a rusty color. I would guess the hot water is about 170 degrees F.

We'll see how this vertical pic works out. I've had trouble posting them in the past.
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
:cool:

Next, I stopped by the Topaz Internment (Relocation) Site.

I still have a hard time believing that not too long ago, our government took people out of their homes and placed them by force in a camp in the middle of the desert. I know this was done all over the US, but to be there and see where it actually took place was sobering. The foundations for the barrack type houses are still there. The grid layout is visible on Google Earth. I was depressed after 30 seconds of thinking of someone being uprooted from their nice home where trees abound to then have to live in this God-forsaken place.

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Way in the background behind the flag is my goal. The shark fin looking peak...a long ways to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Then I rode and rode until my wrist cramped, then I rode some more.

I came across an observatory with nothing else around. It's not like any observatory I've ever seen. It looked like a bunch of garages linked together in horseshoe shapes. Wonder what they really are?

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I finally came to Death Canyon...yep, how's that for the name of a road? The fact that the sign is dead on the ground is kind of ominous, as well.

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Next was Marjum Canyon, and the old Hwy 6 / 50. Hard to believe this used to be the main way to get from central Utah to Nevada and eventually California. Imagine an old Buick meeting a 33 Ford 5-window with a rumble seat in the back on this 'road.'

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Finally to my camping spot for the night...Painter Spring. This is the cross road where...hey, what's that on the right? An old Ford? Well I'll be....

Way in the background, sticking above everything else is Notch Peak. The second highest vertical cliff in the US. Only El Cap is taller. I'll be on top of that sometime tomorrow...at least that is the goal.

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Another view of Notch Peak.

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My camp is set
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And this is my view from my tent. Not bad. Still, I haven't seen another human since stopping for fuel in Delta. That was 8 hours before. I feel like the last man on earth.
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Discussion Starter #9
What the....?

I'm being told I can only upload 10 files to a post? What's that all about?

How do I overcome that rule? I have more pics that I think all of you would enjoy. Am I just doing something the wrong way?

Any help or advice is appreciated.
 

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Great story and trip so far. Your preview pic of the hot springs was sideways but when you click on it it is fine. #5 onward no can see.
 

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Sounds like a really good adventure. More photos please!

If one goes back and uses "edit" to re-attach photos then forum audience will see imagery rather than the all too common "Invalid Post"

The brilliant use of plastic waste baskets in the Versa Paks is almost a necessity, as is the large gas tank. The stock tank is just too small for the "Big Empties" that these bikes are so good at luring us into.
 

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click edit on your posts where the pics aren't showing and then delete the old pic or pic links etc and replace once again with your desired pic(s)

I love the pics btw I love that part of the country for riding

As far as pic posting limits I usually get stuck at around 4 per post anything more and I just create another post and add more pics
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You definitely need to be cautious at the Hot Springs. Sisters dog jumped in one that wasn't cooled off and ended up parboiled. Died a couple of days later.
Buddy and I used to hunt deer up by the peak in years gone by. I've panned for gold in the stream on the way up to the peak. Did you visit the Hermits cabin in Marjum pass?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Wow, Trikstr. That's really sad to hear about the dog. Yeah, I could only put my finger in up to my second knuckle before I had to yank it out because it was so hot.

I'll try the suggestions for the photo links. I wish it was as easy as it used to be to post them. I haven't posted many of my rides just because it isn't as intuitive as previously.
 

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I take my IR sensor when I go hot springing. Often water temp can be adjusted by adding cold water, or her by reducing hot water inflow allowing tub to cool in the 30-ish morning air. thermometer.jpg
The IR device is a simple $30 tool good to leave in the car. In winter can shoot roadbeds out the window while moving to detect icing conditions not necessarily dependent on ambient air temps.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
good idea, Fred.

Hey, will you check to see if my editing the past pics worked? Also, let me know if the vertical or portrait pics are sideways or in the correct orientation?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Alright, back to the adventure.

The next morning I woke up, filtered some water from the spring to top off my 100 oz Camelbak, then filled a back up 100 oz bladder to stow, along with filling a few smaller bottles of water. There is no water between here, my all day hike, and then the long ride back to civilization. Can't have too much, right?

I had to go back through Marjum Canyon, so I thought I'd try and find the 'hermit's cabin' I've heard about for so many years.
The story goes that Bob Stinson fought in WWI and suffered from shell shock (today's PTSD). His long time girlfriend also left him for another man, so he packed everything he owned into what he referred to as his 'house car' and headed towards California.

He made it as far as the west side of Marjum Canyon and his car crapped out. He decided to stay in the canyon and make it his home. He lived out of his car while he developed a natural cave into a home by building a front on it with stacked rocks. He eventually had a stove inside and sustained himself with odd jobs for the government (like plowing and grading the old Hwy 6 ) , trapping bobcats for the hide, and making hooch or beer for the CCC reservoir builders to buy as they passed through. He lived there until he died many years later.

Here's his 'cabin'.
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I liked the inside where he carved out a seat in the rock, and added some shelves. Now there is a geocache and a register inside. It's amazing how many people stop in to see Bob's legacy.

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Next I rode past where you can stop to dig up trilobite fossils by the shovel full, and found my way to the West Desert Sinkhole.

The sinkhole was said to have been carved by an ancient underground river. Legend has it that the West Desert Sinkhole was discovered in 1927 by Joseph Nielson. Nielson was driving some mules on a dark night back to his camp when he strayed into the area by mistake. Nielson's horse stopped and refused to take another step. Nielson got off his horse and started walking forward when suddenly, the ground below his feet gave way tumbling into the unseen sinkhole. In desperation, he held onto the reins and his horse quickly backed up, pulling him away from the yet unseen danger.

Neilson remounted his horse leaving the reins limp, placing his trust in the horse. His horse reportedly backed up for another 50 feet before he veered away at a 90 degree angle and trotted off to safety. The next day, Neilson retraced his steps. As he approached the sinkhole, his horse refused to go anywhere near it. As Nielson continued, what he saw made his knees so weak he had to sit down. There before him was a sinkhole that he estimated was about 90 feet deep and 70 feet across.

You can see the size of this hole in comparison to my TW in the background. When you search for it on Google Earth, it's a perfectly round black dot in the wide open desert landscape.

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