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Discussion Starter #1
I know this might not be the place to ask this question because you all love your T-dubs. I really want one after reading about your folk's stories. I have one nagging thing though that keeps showing up: why so many T-dubs on the used market with less than 500 miles?

I'm amazed to see so many with even under 200 miles and the bikes are 10 years old. Do people buy them with false expectations? Is there something about the T-dubs that really turn people off once they get it? Do they not do well on the streets so people just don't ride them? I've never seen another model that gets so little use. This makes me wonder if I would be another statistic?

I have had many bikes that I have truly loved. My BMW R1100RL, R60/5, Honda XLR250R Baja, and ATC185S are all bikes I love/loved. A few years back I sold my XR650L solely because it was too heavy, too tall, sucked in Michigan sand. I also wanted to do more long road trips. I think the Tdub would not be too heavy, nor too tall, and would do better in sand than the front heavy XR650L. I'll keep the BMW for long road trips but a Tdub would be fun for just farting around locally and off road.

Back to my question, why do you think there are so many used T-dubs with ridiculously low miles?

Jay Dub
 
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I think they are often bought by beginner riders to start out on then they soon move on to something bigger or lose interest in riding,They are great little bikes for trails and backroads, not the best for freeway use. The bike is outdated technology wise but is still a lot of fun. If you buy it to do some backroad/trail exploring, I think you'll be happy with it. If you buy used and decide it's not for you, it should be easy to sell and get your money back.
 

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So many of them had low miles due to the fact that they were used as accessory bikes with RV's traveling and camping. They would get a little use in campgrounds and poking around and not a whole lot more. But as you know, they are good for a whole lot more than that!
 

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A few people buy them for the way they look — then find out they can’t turn a two-valve thumper into a racing bike. Others need them for maybe just the one season, then stick them in the barn. Some just treat them as “toys”.

Some “use” them for what they’re best at — these are the guys who rack up the miles ……….

Don’t get me wrong — if you’ve got the dollars — you can do what you like with them.

I think there’s a middle ground here as well — people with a lot of bikes (like yourself), who want to have a TW for its capabilities, rather than an “everyday” ride.

Lives change — a lot of people start out with the best intentions, then go in a different direction …….
 

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Some of us are just "Old" when we buy them, and then die or go blind at our advanced ages, and can't rack up miles on the TW....{insert Sarcasm icon};)

Seriously though....I've had my 2014 purchased new since late March of 2014...and I've just passed the 1000 mile mark on it...why? Because I'm seldom into pavement riding these days, and there just isn't much gravel around here....me and Montezuma Nick{whose 2015 now has 300 miles on it} plan on a couple of rides this summer to add some mainly off road miles....but frankly, I don't ever think I will put 10,000 on mine, even if I stay active and healthy....not that I don't love it, but not being 25 anymore, I don't feel the need to jump on the TW every chance I get....even the 8 days riding in Moab, I only put 300 or so miles on mine....and was perfectly happy with that.

If you buy a TW for commute, IMO there are better options, if you buy it for nothing but hard core off road reasons, IMO there are better options...if you purchase one to ride around town, back country paved and non-paved roads, and trail riding....you will be hard pressed to find a better bike for the fun and money. :)
 

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I like this question. I'm not an expert on human behavior by any means, but I'll take a stab at what could be some of the many reasons "Low mile TW's" frequently end up on the market.

Theory 1. Preferences. Some of the TW's are acquired / purchased by folks with more than one type of bike & ridding experiences. At first they enjoy / think they enjoy the concept of what is (arguably) undoubtedly the best all around trail bike ever produced. Now here is where it becomes a bit more complicated... A: The feeling the bike does not live up to "Their" expectations. Such as "It's under-powered" or "It does not ride like my motocross bike". This is true. Quickly stated, the TW is a trail bike, adaptable to fulfill all the variable rolls of such. Nuf said.
B: "I was hoping to have more time to use it / enjoy the TW. Sad but true, due to busy lives, changes in life styles (almost never of ones choice), and health issues, many of the TW's end up in the barn or garage to sit...
C: I already have more bikes than I can ride / use! Although most likely the rarest of all reasons, it does occur. The bike comes their way from a relative or friend, and the bike sits un-used again for many reasons.

As stated the TW is (arguably) undoubtedly the best all around trail bike ever produced, and can be modified to suit many different needs, roles, & tastes, or used stock! For those people who enjoy the trail riding experience, this bike is an excellent choice.

When a low mile 10 year old TW presents its self, it may be a golden opportunity. :cool: m.
 

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All good answers, and I'll add a few of my own: 1) many t'dubs come second hand from motorcycle safety schools or state patrol n such agencies that use it to teach new riders. Mine was one if these. These bikes rack up very little mileage through cones. 2) Other agencies such as wildlife, parks, sheriffs, etc. get these new and put them out second hand with low miles. 3) Some guys buy these for hunting season, and only use them then. Here in WA they are perfect for that as you need to be plated to run on FS roads, but can still be awesome on the trails to get firewood, scout, and pack out your game. Well that is my 2 cents worth.
 

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I picked mine up from a nice older lady who had been "pressured" into riding, and decided that she didn't like it. She put one tank of gas through it, 62 miles. It sputtered and died when I started it at her place. I bought it on the spot, and for a good price. In Fairbanks our riding season is short, and sometimes things come up in the summer, and riding is cut short. I bought mine in 2011 - it's a 2009. I have just under 2000 miles on it. I have had zero problems with it that weren't of my own doing. I will never sell it. If you find one with low miles for a good price, pick it up and don't worry about it. If you don't like it, just turn around and sell it for what you paid for it.
 

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Thing about these bikes since 2000 they are pretty much unchanged. I could give a rip about year, as long as it is after 1990 with a good cdi and has low miles and is not rusted up, it has a lot of miles to go. The difference in my 03 and 09 is a different front fender color so big deal, they ride the same and are basically identical.

As far as mileage, From 03 when it was new till about 13 it hardly had a thousand mi put on it. Was working away from home and it sat. After an oil change and retirement it gets out and the dust knocked off. With a recent carb cleaning, a kick starter and handguards installed it is right up there with a 2015 and then some.
 

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You can ride a TW all day long plunking around in the woods and not do more than 20 miles but get a good work out. Mine took me to hard to get to spots along the river where I liked to fish but the trip was less than a few miles. I will always believe instead of naming it the Trail Way they should have named it the Trail Mule! You will have a very hard time finding a bike that is great for rural roads and perfect for those off road adventures when you see a nice old coach path or logging road.

Ditto on the above comment about these bikes being virtually unchanged since their introduction. From 2001 to the present not much has changed at all so weather the bike is 2001 or a 2015 is inconsequential. From 1988 right through 2000 they too are all the same. The 1987 model had a different CDI system that could be problematic. Many, many parts from a 1987 still are a perfect fit on the 2015 models. Kind of like Yamaha changes their dresses but they never gain any weight or lose their shape.

GaryL
 

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This is the way I got mine. It was loaned by the dealer to a motorcycle safety training organization and just sat for 3 months. Odometer hadn't even turned over 1 mile. Got it for $3900 out the door with warranty.


All good answers, and I'll add a few of my own: 1) many t'dubs come second hand from motorcycle safety schools or state patrol n such agencies that use it to teach new riders. Mine was one if these. These bikes rack up very little mileage through cones. 2) Other agencies such as wildlife, parks, sheriffs, etc. get these new and put them out second hand with low miles. 3) Some guys buy these for hunting season, and only use them then. Here in WA they are perfect for that as you need to be plated to run on FS roads, but can still be awesome on the trails to get firewood, scout, and pack out your game. Well that is my 2 cents worth.
 

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Got mine from a college student who needed the cash. He only ever used it when he was home visiting his folks so a pristine '01 model basically fell into my lap with only a couple hundred miles on the clock.

It's perfect for what I want to do - explore and go fishing. It's just fast enough for the street sections and is more than capable of going down woodland tracks and unkept dirt roads to get to the stream.
'No Winter Maintenance' means no summer maintenance either from what shape the roadway is usually in.
 

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Welcome fellow Wolverine. I see you sold your 650 for the same reason I sold my XR400. Just too damn heavy and tall. Still have a CRF450 and an antique 1975 CR250, last of the 2 stroke air heads, plus my Kaw Z 900. That bike still makes people go "What the hell????", from a seventies vintage bike.

The TW200, it ain't fast but does go pretty good through the woods and single track. It needs some help with a different tire in order to feel good through the sand. I'm looking at a Pirelli MT 21 in 140/80 18 for a front tire. Slow and controlled though the woods out back is fun.
 

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The TW was never designed for constant highway speeds. Luckily mine will tolerate me doing 55-65 all day long. I racked up about 10,000 miles on the TW in almost one year.
 

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The TW was never designed for constant highway speeds. Luckily mine will tolerate me doing 55-65 all day long. I racked up about 10,000 miles on the TW in almost one year.
You're an animal. Mine will do 55-65 but whenever I do I wish I was riding my GS.

I rarely put more than 100 mi. or one tank of fuel on my TW. But I'll ride all day 200-300 mi. on my GS.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
This is good stuff. It just seemed so strange to see so many come up for sale (usually a long ways from where I live) that have so few miles. It has just made me wonder why so few miles. It makes sense for some of the reasons mentioned. I wonder if the high mile ones are people that won't give them up so they never go for sale? I've never seen a model that so often is for sale with so few miles.

When one comes up for sale in my area with low miles (1990-2000 model) and not too expensive, I'll be all over it.
 

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This is good stuff. It just seemed so strange to see so many come up for sale (usually a long ways from where I live) that have so few miles. It has just made me wonder why so few miles. It makes sense for some of the reasons mentioned. I wonder if the high mile ones are people that won't give them up so they never go for sale? I've never seen a model that so often is for sale with so few miles.

When one comes up for sale in my area with low miles (1990-2000 model) and not too expensive, I'll be all over it.
I happen to love the 1988-2000 TWs best. Don't need no front disc brake and would trade it in a heartbeat for a kick start. Like the TW can go so fast it needs a disc brake???? BUT, when it won't go because the battery is dead I sure do love that old fashioned kicker. I also highly prefer the old style carb over the new ones, just because I know them better and they work just as well. Keep in mind that all upgrades/updates are often just more money for not much of an improvement.

GaryL
 

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I have wondered this question also, I think that people either love to ride or just like to ride, my 87 when I got it only had 1232 miles put on it in 27 years, and the guy I got it from only sold it due to a divorce. He loved the bike but for some reason in the 10 years he owned it only put 150 miles on it:confused: He just never took the time to ride. I think it like people said they buy with good intentions to ride but never get around to it. But those of us who love to ride find the time....I have 4000 miles on the bike now in the year and a half I have had it:) and that is not my only bike either. I would really love to ride even more if I had the time but I make do with about 5000-6000 bike miles a year. Like most here mine will go in the grave with me, all my other bikes can go but the tw is forever:D
 

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There are so many low mileage TW's for sale because Placer, and Gary, and TWbrian only have so much money available to keep snapping them up!



Tom
 
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