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Discussion Starter #1
I have installed a cheap oring chain after quickly wearing out an expensive Renthal standard chain. (That was the 2nd Renthal chain I bought that disappointed me)
I can clearly notice that the oring chain adds a smoothness not present with a standard chain. At first I thought it might be in my head but definitely not. And I have not had to adjust it in 500 miles.
 

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The stock factory chain on all TDubs are DID, one of the biggest and best mass-producers in the world. Unfortunately as you know the one Yamaha includes with the bike is a DID but the cheapest and bottom-of-the-barrel "NO-Ring". What a piece of crap! I didn't realize this until I changed-out mine early on.
So your "O-Ring" is certainly a huge upgrade from stock.

I don't know what or which Renthal chain you say you wore out. Great company but a lot of them just lend their name to another product and you think you are getting something special.

Along with the bargain basement stock factory chain the supplied stock sprocket is equally crappy. The X-Chain I switched to did not set very well with the stock spocket as I was counting links (I was changing from a 50T to a 47T). Seemed kinda "thin" compared. So I did the chain & spocket together, now mated to a JT47.

Pushing over 2000 miles without a chain adjustment. The next little knotch up on the "snails" make it too tight, I tried already. It's almost ridiculous but I ain't complaining!


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Build & quality between the two is so very obvious as soon as you open the box. Change your stock chain... change your stock sprocket. Doesn't matter if it is worn-out of not.
I was going for the most mild (50T to 47T) sprocket change anyway but you can get a JT in 50T (or anything else) too if you wanted. Really any aftermarket manufacture seemed better quality than the stock sprocket.
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Stock sprocket with stock chain. This is with about 700 miles on both.
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Over-the-top better!
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Hey Stage...
Thanks for the good write up and great pix!

I'll be changing sprockets & chain soon.
My bike does not get ridden in rain, mud or sand and I'm considering an aluminum rear as part of her "weight loss program". Kind of a hobby within a hobby.
She's lost 20+ lbs. so for with a few more in the plan. I love losing any weight on any bike...especially un-sprung weight...especially off that cast iron rear wheel!

Of course, I realize an aluminum sprocket will wear faster than steel. But they have a pretty easy life on this bike so that's of little concern.

So...what do you, and anyone else, think about that?
Experience? Opinions?
 

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Just plain wore away quickly. This was my aluminum sprocket after 3-4 months of use. Granted I ride off road in all conditions which can be hard on any chain. The weight savings of an aluminum sprocket isn’t worth it for me over the longer life span of a steel sprocket. You may very well get a longer life span than I with your different riding environments and style. My opinion based on my experience.
 

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Just plain wore away quickly. This was my aluminum sprocket after 3-4 months of use. Granted I ride off road in all conditions which can be hard on any chain. The weight savings of an aluminum chain isn’t worth it for me over the longer life span of a steel sprocket. You may very well get a longer life span than I with your different riding environments and style. My opinion based on my experience.
Your sprocket looked like mine on the street at about 20,000 miles or so. Obviously off road is much harsher.
 

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Obviously Admiral is an extreme case of riding off-road in any and all conditions. So aluminum vs. steel for his purposes may not match yours.
My XR250 came with a 50T aftermarket sprocket. The stock one in 1991 was supposed to be a 44T. So somewhere along the line someone chose off-road as it's primary duty. When I went to upgrade the worn-out chain and sprocket I of course leaned towards an X-Ring based on my experience with the TDub. That was easy but finding a 50T replacement sprocket for a 1991 Honda was like finding Hens Teeth. And I really wanted it bad as the 50T gave me head-snapping lower torque, something missing with the more gentle TDub.
The best I could find without having a custom one made by Sprocket Specialists (and there is another reputable company too) was a 50T in aluminum or a 46T in steel. I went for the steel. The lighter weight of the aluminum was not going to make the bike perform better or faster and I'm looking for a long term relationship with it too, I want it to last.
For a fast street bike as many composite and aluminum parts will certainly lighten the load. Power gain for a TW... I've lost about 35lbs. over the last 5 months. It really does go a lot faster now, no kidding. in fact all of my bikes seem to. HaHa.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would think you'd be fine with an aluminum sprocket. Yz450 uses aluminum with 60hp ,the TW should be ok with 13hp.
I saw online aluminum snail adjusters which would save a few oz. You could probably get aluminum brake arms from a older drum brake YZ. Also have someone machine aluminum spacers to replace the steel wheel spacers. A Clark tank is much lighter than a stock tank.
 
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