TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 65 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,888 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here in the UK we do not have “Ethanol” mix in our fuel. We use standard vastly over-priced (thanks to government tax) un-leaded “Petrol”.

With price per litre currently running at £1.14 GBP, at least they have the decency to give us the “good stuff” — 96 octane. And for a few pence per litre more, 98 octane. As far as “standard” cars go, there’s little difference between the two octanes, despite manufacturers claims — but for the odd high performance cars that need it, it’s nice to have the option.

My question (although I may have answered it above) — is — “would a raised octane rating make any difference to the performance of a TW” ?

I have no idea of what my bike is doing to the gallon, I keep the tank topped up from a container in my garage, ready to roll for each trip. My question primarily concerns how the bike would “run”.

I notice from previous threads that some of you have the option of fuel types — how does that work out for you ? ………
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Hey Purple, I use high octane fuel because the higher the octane, the lower the combustion chamber temperatures. High octane is a small price to pay to keep our little air-cooled engines in their acceptable temperature zones, especially since I ask my TW to propel my 250 lbs as well as my "stuff" down freeways at 70 mph. To make matters worse, it get really hot here in Sacramento, CA in the summer.

Having read similar posts in the past, I'm sure there will be those who disagree. Enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
The reason higher octane than needed runs cooler is because not all of it is being burned. In other words.......wasting money. Run the lowest octane possible without having detonation. This will give you best performance and mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
915 Posts
87 octane for me. I tried 91 non-ethanol. TW did not like it. If the 87 has ethanol I add Seafoam or StarTron (or, Staibil for ethanol).

I think of the TW as a tractor rather than a sports car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
I only run 90 octane non-ethanol in everything except my truck. Ive had way too many issues with ethanol. I use a product called Gas-Shok sold here in Punta-Gorda, Fl.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I only run 90 octane non-ethanol in everything except my truck. Ive had way too many issues with ethanol. I use a product called Gas-Shok sold here in Punta-Gorda, Fl.
Me too we call it REC90. I don't like the 90 octane, wish it was 87 but doubt it makes a difference. But do like the lack of ethanol so thats why it is ran in my bikes and boats. When I used to dyno my Hayabusa, it made more power with 87 than the 93. Never ran REC90 in it wasn't very plentiful where I used to live. Was big debates on the forums, any motor that is efficient and does not have a very high compression ratio such as supercharged or turbocharged engines do not need high octane. You are wasting your money running high octane in a TW, it will be fine with 87. It is a fact that the REC90 will make more power due to the lack of the lower BTU ethanol, although I doubt it is noticeable. And right now down here in the keys I am paying about 2.60usd per us gallon for regular old 87 and it is about 3.50 for REC90
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,051 Posts
I use the good stuff -- it is only a few more cents to fill the tank and I swear it runs better. OK, maybe me thinking it runs better is placebo but who cares as long as I think it runs better that is all that counts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I use the good stuff -- it is only a few more cents to fill the tank and I swear it runs better. OK, maybe me thinking it runs better is placebo but who cares as long as I think it runs better that is all that counts.
Higher octane is not "the good stuff" it is the slower burning higher octane fuel. It is no better than 87 just more expensive. If you buy into the notion that it has more detergents or treatment. Take the .50 a gallon and buy something you know your adding such as sea foam or redline fuel treatment. Then you know for a fact your getting a good fuel treatment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,355 Posts
I use the good stuff -- it is only a few more cents to fill the tank and I swear it runs better. OK, maybe me thinking it runs better is placebo but who cares as long as I think it runs better that is all that counts.
So do you think mine run's better with it too? Gee I hope so;)



Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
I use the cheepest non-brand ethanol laced 87 octane liquid dinosaur I can find. Been doing this in my 55,000 mile+ TW; 61,000 mile V-STAR 650 two up pulling a trailer; 230,000 Ford Windstar; 7,000 mile 2 stroke stella scooter with sidecar and now the 2011Chrysler Town&Country. Also when I'm out west run 85 octane. Never had a fuel issue. Sometimes fill the flex fuel Chrysler with E85. My fleet issued 2006 Dodeg Ram has run exclusively on E85. Our regional fleet of vehicles have run millions of miles on regular E10 and E85 fuels without issues. I'm just a regular guy...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,051 Posts
Higher octane is not "the good stuff" it is the slower burning higher octane fuel. It is no better than 87 just more expensive. If you buy into the notion that it has more detergents or treatment. Take the .50 a gallon and buy something you know your adding such as sea foam or redline fuel treatment. Then you know for a fact your getting a good fuel treatment.
Once upon a time, long, long ago, I bought the cheapest regular gas from the cheapest gas station I could find and used that in my car. (It was a 1955 Chevy, 2 door hardtop, with a 265, 2bbl. carb, and a 3 speed trans that I bought for $100 and it had four new tires on it and how I wish I still had it!) It ran very poorly as in "like crap". Then one day someone bought me a tankful of Super Shell, the kind you can't get any more. 101+ octane. Leaded fuel. I think it cost 33 cents a gallon -- the crap I was using was 25 cents a gallon. Before 1/4 of the tank was gone the missing stopped and it had more power and ran smoother. Not just smoother but ran a whole lot better. Since that experience I have paid extra and avoided the cheap stuff. Just my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Once upon a time, long, long ago, I bought the cheapest regular gas from the cheapest gas station I could find and used that in my car. (It was a 1955 Chevy, 2 door hardtop, with a 265, 2bbl. carb, and a 3 speed trans that I bought for $100 and it had four new tires on it and how I wish I still had it!) It ran very poorly as in "like crap". Then one day someone bought me a tankful of Super Shell, the kind you can't get any more. 101+ octane. Leaded fuel. I think it cost 33 cents a gallon -- the crap I was using was 25 cents a gallon. Before 1/4 of the tank was gone the missing stopped and it had more power and ran smoother. Not just smoother but ran a whole lot better. Since that experience I have paid extra and avoided the cheap stuff. Just my experience.
LOL that was 1955 technology, as I stated before if you are putting it in an "effecient engine", which a chevy 265 is not. Fuel back then was totally different then too. Also maybe your timing was out on that chevy. And high octane is a total waste on electronic controlled engines as they adjust for knock. But hey who am I to tell you what to run, just saying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I use premium for a different reason. One five gallon can of treated fuel works in every four stroke engine that I own, motorcycles, boat, mowers etc. Now I don't have multiple cans of fuel laying around getting stale. Also, if I get caught with fuel in something that isn't going to be used for a while, it doesn't become a problem. Additional cost over the course of a year, a few dollars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
A little education is needed as to what octane ratings mean. Higher octane fuel is not "better". Higher octane fuels are meant for high compression engines, not for a low compression engine like the TW. They contain ignition "inhibitors" that slow down the burn and prevent pre-ignition or pre-detonation of the fuel in a high compression engine.. They actually have less "power" and will give lower gas mileage if used in the TW. All you are doing is making your bike perform "better" because your wallet is lightened. There is absolutely no reason to burn high octane or premium fuel in the TW and the manufacturer's recommendation is to use 87 octane, or regular gas. There are not any more additives in premium high octane fuel than there are in regular fuel, you are falling for the old hype that high octane fuel is better but it is NOT. If you think your bike runs better on it, you are only fooling yourself. Do you really think you know better than the Yamaha engineers who designed this thing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Here in the UK we do not have “Ethanol” mix in our fuel. We use standard vastly over-priced (thanks to government tax) un-leaded “Petrol”.

With price per litre currently running at £1.14 GBP, at least they have the decency to give us the “good stuff” — 96 octane. And for a few pence per litre more, 98 octane. As far as “standard” cars go, there’s little difference between the two octanes, despite manufacturers claims — but for the odd high performance cars that need it, it’s nice to have the option.

My question (although I may have answered it above) — is — “would a raised octane rating make any difference to the performance of a TW” ?

I have no idea of what my bike is doing to the gallon, I keep the tank topped up from a container in my garage, ready to roll for each trip. My question primarily concerns how the bike would “run”.

I notice from previous threads that some of you have the option of fuel types — how does that work out for you ? ………
Wow did some quick math and if you are paying 1.14 british pound/liter. That equats to 6.76 usd/gallon here. OUCH. I paid 2.60 usd/gallon the other day. Curious does anyone there commute very much there? Over 1/3 of americans commute 16+ miles each way to work. With 76 percent of them driving alone in a car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,371 Posts
I am not a scientist but I do believe that higher octane fuel is a requirement for higher compression engines. Muscle cars of the past as well as some newer sport models do in fact have higher compression combustion chambers and the higher octane is required. With higher compression the higher octane is able to burn or combust completely. Using high octane in a low compression engine is just a waste, Placebo if you will and you won't get better mileage or a cleaner running engine. 87 or 89 is the perfect fuel for our TWs but non ethanol will always be my first choice. If I could buy non ethanol fuel in 89-93 octane I would happily pay the premium price to keep corn out of my fuel system.

If we had access to a MC Dynomometer and could accurately test the engine output with various fuels I am quite sure it would prove that higher octane does not equal better performance in our Tdubs.

GaryL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
A little education is needed as to what octane ratings mean. Higher octane fuel is not "better". Higher octane fuels are meant for high compression engines, not for a low compression engine like the TW. They contain ignition "inhibitors" that slow down the burn and prevent pre-ignition or pre-detonation of the fuel in a high compression engine.. They actually have less "power" and will give lower gas mileage if used in the TW. All you are doing is making your bike perform "better" because your wallet is lightened. There is absolutely no reason to burn high octane or premium fuel in the TW and the manufacturer's recommendation is to use 87 octane, or regular gas. There are not any more additives in premium high octane fuel than there are in regular fuel, you are falling for the old hype that high octane fuel is better but it is NOT. If you think your bike runs better on it, you are only fooling yourself. Do you really think you know better than the Yamaha engineers who designed this thing?
Just a clarification. The fuel itself (higher octane) does not have less power. Both low and high octane fuels have the same BTUs.
 
1 - 20 of 65 Posts
Top