TW200 Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I discovered today that in Arizona, not only must my TW200 be registered for street use, since I intend to use it primarily on improved roads and highways, but also must have an off-highway vehicle registration decal because it is manufactured as an off-road bike. Really? There's another $25.00 a year and one more thing I now have to remember
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
I discovered today that in Arizona, not only must my TW200 be registered for street use, since I intend to use it primarily on improved roads and highways, but also must have an off-highway vehicle registration decal because it is manufactured as an off-road bike. Really? There's another $25.00 a year and one more thing I now have to remember




Well Jeffery, I rationalize it to myself this way... it helps support the area's that I love to spend time in. We are actually trying to get a vote through our Crime Bosses, erh state congress to post a 30$ a year fee on the tow vehicle to support riding/sledding area's.

Yeah, yeah I know, it's public property. However, it's DNR, F&W or SP land here that's in jeapardy and they don't HAVE to allow access. I'd rather pay a fee and have it, than have 30 bucks a year in my pocket and no where to ride. It's a pay as you go society these days.



So, sorry my friend that you got the bad news, but thank you for being a concientious and good citizen and helping with the cause. I believe there is a big wheel out there that returns to us that which we place on it. Good On Ya!



Bag
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well Jeffery, I rationalize it to myself this way... it helps support the area's that I love to spend time in. We are actually trying to get a vote through our Crime Bosses, erh state congress to post a 30$ a year fee on the tow vehicle to support riding/sledding area's.

Yeah, yeah I know, it's public property. However, it's DNR, F&W or SP land here that's in jeapardy and they don't HAVE to allow access. I'd rather pay a fee and have it, than have 30 bucks a year in my pocket and no where to ride. It's a pay as you go society these days.



So, sorry my friend that you got the bad news, but thank you for being a concientious and good citizen and helping with the cause. I believe there is a big wheel out there that returns to us that which we place on it. Good On Ya!



Bag


Well, when you put it that way, I guess I don't feel quite so bad about it either. I was just a little frustrated at the idea (If I've interpreted the law correctly) that I have to purchase the decal every year, even if I never get the tires dirty, simply because the state has determined that it is an off-road bike, that's all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,418 Posts
I just hope your state does not gut the ORV funds to pay for their pet projects like Maryland did a few years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
I discovered today that in Arizona, not only must my TW200 be registered for street use, since I intend to use it primarily on improved roads and highways, but also must have an off-highway vehicle registration decal because it is manufactured as an off-road bike. Really? There's another $25.00 a year and one more thing I now have to remember


It's unfortunate that a lot of things that use to be free no longer are. Some states are excellent stewards of this money and others are not.



Also, If you ride in other states check out if they have reciprocal agreements with your home state. For instance WA and UT have reciprocal agreements with off road vehicles.



If there is no reciprocal agreement then an out of stater may have to pay that state for the privilege to ride off road depending on that states regulations. Riding for out of staters' is getting more complicated as well (see below) So image your a dual sport rider and want to go from Washington to Maine and were planning to ride a bit of off road where every you could. It might not be as easy as one thinks any more.




Good news is if you have the AR decal your good in Oregon




Mike



PS here is an example of Oregon Policies



Oregon will honor off road permits from the following states:

Alaska

Arizona

California

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Missouri

Montana

Nevada

North Dakota

Pennsylvania

South Carolina

Utah

Vermont

Washington *

Wisconsin



* Anyone riding in Oregon is required to have an off road permit/decal for off road areas. This is a state law. Reciprocity is granted to those individuals who have a valid off road permit/decal. This is the only permit which we accept in our reciprocity agreement with other states. Within Washington's laws, they offer reciprocity to other states under two directions, ORV permit or vehicle license. Only one is similar to our program and that is the ATV Permit/Decal. Dual sport motorcycles with license plates do not qualify under the reciprocity agreement.



Note Oregon's definition of an ATV - Class III ATV, as defined in ORS 801.194 is an off-highway motorcycle with a dry weight of 600 pounds or less that travels on two tires. Most riders refer to a Class III All-Terrain Vehicle as a motorcycle.



Also the National Forest Service roads require the driver to be licensed, have the proper endorsements, and the vehicle properly registered.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
You might research the laws yourself as at least in Washington State, not everyone in authority knows the correct answer. About a month and a half ago, I went through this here. I went to register my new to me TW and the girl at the local Auditor's office asked if I wanted to register it as a "dual sport". When I said yes, I was presented with two registrations, a vehicle license and ORV tag. Total cost, about $153.00. I stupidly paid for both of them and went on my way thinking somehow I'd just been taken. That night I researched the RCW's and found out that in Washington, if the vehicle is licensed for the road, it is legal to ride on any road or public property in the state without the ORV tag. I called the DOL the next day and the woman confirmed this and said she was surprised the auditor's office didn't know it. She forwarded me the form to refund my money except fot the auditor's fee, but she said I could get that from them. I went to the auditor's office that day and was told that I did indeed need the ORV because that's what several officers had told them. When I gave her the RCW # she just said that she didn't know the laws and it was just her job to sell the licenses. She also said there was no way for her system to refund the $7.00 filing fee. I was beginning to burn, so went to the local Police station in Richland. There I was told by the Sergeant in charge that yes I did need the ORV tag and that I would be ticketed if I were caught riding on forest service or other roads on public property. When I quoted the RCW, he seemed at a loss and after about 10 minutes of being gone form the window, came back and said I needed to speak with the officer who was designated as the motorcycle specialist and gave me her contact information. The next day I called her (very nice lady) and said that I did not need the ORV as long as I was licensed and if I or anyone else were ticketed it was wrong. I thanked her and hung up. After about a month I've been able to get all but $4.00 of my ORV license fees back, so I guess I'm as good as I'll get. I also have made a copy of the RCW and keep it on my bike with my registration and the lady officer's card so I have some backup if I'm stopped in the future. In thinking about it, why should we have to pay twice for the privilege of driving down some dirt road when a car or truck doesn't?



It may be different in your State, but you might look into it some.



Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
The dual purpose motorcycle has definitely been an afterthought in most states. Here in MN we need a OHV sticker to ride off road, but we can only ride in certain designated areas off road, not in all places ATV's can ride in. The OHV permit from here is valid in South Dakota, but not Colorado, but is in Utah. It is a complete patchwork in most states were you can ride with an OHV permit, where you can't and where the regular vehicle license is sufficient. I have been thinking about riding the Adventure Cycling route down the spine of the Rocky Mountains from the Canadian border to the Mexican border, but the permit issue is potentially an impediment. I haven't fully researched this issue yet so I'm not sure how much of a problem it will prove to be. In any event it will be different for riders depending on what state they are licensed in. This is an area where some organized advocacy at the state legislative level is needed and a website that has a table laying out the reciprocity rights would be helpful. Maybe there is such a table and if someone here knows about it, a link would certainly be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You might research the laws yourself as at least in Washington State, not everyone in authority knows the correct answer. About a month and a half ago, I went through this here. I went to register my new to me TW and the girl at the local Auditor's office asked if I wanted to register it as a "dual sport". When I said yes, I was presented with two registrations, a vehicle license and ORV tag. Total cost, about $153.00. I stupidly paid for both of them and went on my way thinking somehow I'd just been taken. That night I researched the RCW's and found out that in Washington, if the vehicle is licensed for the road, it is legal to ride on any road or public property in the state without the ORV tag. I called the DOL the next day and the woman confirmed this and said she was surprised the auditor's office didn't know it. She forwarded me the form to refund my money except fot the auditor's fee, but she said I could get that from them. I went to the auditor's office that day and was told that I did indeed need the ORV because that's what several officers had told them. When I gave her the RCW # she just said that she didn't know the laws and it was just her job to sell the licenses. She also said there was no way for her system to refund the $7.00 filing fee. I was beginning to burn, so went to the local Police station in Richland. There I was told by the Sergeant in charge that yes I did need the ORV tag and that I would be ticketed if I were caught riding on forest service or other roads on public property. When I quoted the RCW, he seemed at a loss and after about 10 minutes of being gone form the window, came back and said I needed to speak with the officer who was designated as the motorcycle specialist and gave me her contact information. The next day I called her (very nice lady) and said that I did not need the ORV as long as I was licensed and if I or anyone else were ticketed it was wrong. I thanked her and hung up. After about a month I've been able to get all but $4.00 of my ORV license fees back, so I guess I'm as good as I'll get. I also have made a copy of the RCW and keep it on my bike with my registration and the lady officer's card so I have some backup if I'm stopped in the future. In thinking about it, why should we have to pay twice for the privilege of driving down some dirt road when a car or truck doesn't?



It may be different in your State, but you might look into it some.



Dave


Dave, I certainly hope I never find myself in a situation like yours, but your story was very entertaining and I will research our OHV laws (just as soon as I get my decal). I believe you came out on top, in a small way, and part of me hopes you are stopped again so you can have the personal satisfaction of presenting your case to the officer and WINNING!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
I come to AZ from IL. I retitled my atv's out here as they do not issue a reg. sticker in IL.



I have reg 3 atv's now and the TW. I have stopped into the DMV and asked questions so I would bring in the correct paper work.



I have never paid the same fee for the atv's in a row. Once I reg mine, and a month later my wifes as her title had not come as it was brand new. Takes 4-6 weeks to get them in IL.



Paid 2 different amounts. Same office different person.



On the TW the lady told me it would be $125 to $150 depending on what year. I thought I was getting a 2008, but it turned out I got a 2009.



When I went in to actually get it. She was not going to sell be the OHV sticker. I told her it was a dual sport. I had to tell her I wanted the OHV sticker. Total cost was $94.67. I almost ran out the door.



The lady was different than the one I had asked the questions to the week before.



So it all depends on who you get.



In Minnesota we were on a group ride on atv's 125 plus on the ride. Two DNR stopped the group to check stickers. I had stickers from 4 states. Wife had a new one then also. Not a sticker.



The law said 30 days I think before need a sticker for out of state people if you had one. He hasseled me and said that was not so. Different guy and my wife. She said she just got hers, and was from out of state. He told her to go on.



It seems you can never get the same answer twice in a row.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
It seems you can never get the same answer twice in a row.


Because the system isn't and has never been based in law. It is revenue generation pure and simple. Some of that may go to maintain the trails and it may not. We have become the most licensed county in the world. Strange that we still think we're free to pursue happiness and all that...



When Al Gore gets the power to tax the air we breathe maybe we'll get the message?



Byte



Sorry for the rant!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
You might research the laws yourself as at least in Washington State, not everyone in authority knows the correct answer. About a month and a half ago, I went through this here. I went to register my new to me TW and the girl at the local Auditor's office asked if I wanted to register it as a "dual sport". When I said yes, I was presented with two registrations, a vehicle license and ORV tag. Total cost, about $153.00. I stupidly paid for both of them and went on my way thinking somehow I'd just been taken. That night I researched the RCW's and found out that in Washington, if the vehicle is licensed for the road, it is legal to ride on any road or public property in the state without the ORV tag. I called the DOL the next day and the woman confirmed this and said she was surprised the auditor's office didn't know it. She forwarded me the form to refund my money except fot the auditor's fee, but she said I could get that from them. I went to the auditor's office that day and was told that I did indeed need the ORV because that's what several officers had told them. When I gave her the RCW # she just said that she didn't know the laws and it was just her job to sell the licenses. She also said there was no way for her system to refund the $7.00 filing fee. I was beginning to burn, so went to the local Police station in Richland. There I was told by the Sergeant in charge that yes I did need the ORV tag and that I would be ticketed if I were caught riding on forest service or other roads on public property. When I quoted the RCW, he seemed at a loss and after about 10 minutes of being gone form the window, came back and said I needed to speak with the officer who was designated as the motorcycle specialist and gave me her contact information. The next day I called her (very nice lady) and said that I did not need the ORV as long as I was licensed and if I or anyone else were ticketed it was wrong. I thanked her and hung up. After about a month I've been able to get all but $4.00 of my ORV license fees back, so I guess I'm as good as I'll get. I also have made a copy of the RCW and keep it on my bike with my registration and the lady officer's card so I have some backup if I'm stopped in the future. In thinking about it, why should we have to pay twice for the privilege of driving down some dirt road when a car or truck doesn't?



It may be different in your State, but you might look into it some.



Dave


Dave,



You have my sympathy. I too, went through a similar process. What I learned is that as long as I'm on the forest service road - no problem if the vehicle is registered and plated properly, but after that it gets messy, no two state employee seem to be able to give you the same answer and I don't carry the WA RCWs with me and that probably wouldn't make any difference if I got stopped.




By the way what is the RCW #?



Thanks



Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
The dual purpose motorcycle has definitely been an afterthought in most states. Here in MN we need a OHV sticker to ride off road, but we can only ride in certain designated areas off road, not in all places ATV's can ride in. The OHV permit from here is valid in South Dakota, but not Colorado, but is in Utah. It is a complete patchwork in most states were you can ride with an OHV permit, where you can't and where the regular vehicle license is sufficient. I have been thinking about riding the Adventure Cycling route down the spine of the Rocky Mountains from the Canadian border to the Mexican border, but the permit issue is potentially an impediment. I haven't fully researched this issue yet so I'm not sure how much of a problem it will prove to be. In any event it will be different for riders depending on what state they are licensed in. This is an area where some organized advocacy at the state legislative level is needed and a website that has a table laying out the reciprocity rights would be helpful. Maybe there is such a table and if someone here knows about it, a link would certainly be appreciated.


Trupath,



You made some good points. Out west it would be nice if BLM and US Forest Service would take some initiative to issue a federal ATV/OHV permit this would make things a lot easier (much like they issue The National Parks and Federal Lands Access Permit). Then the only place states could require permitting is on state land. This would not solve all problems but again out west over 50% of the land in some states are owned by the federal government. As you travel east state permitting becomes much more dominant/important.



You may be predicting the potential bane to multi-state adventure touring. Imagine if you had to license/register/permit your car in each state that you travel through while on vacation-that's what is happening with dual sport vehicles.
It appears that dual sports and ATV permitting is being treated much like the fishing or hunting permitting process.



I don't think many state officials envision a dual sport bike traveling from Washington State to Tennessee on the WABDR to the OBDR then picking up the TAT. If each state only required a $25 permit, assuming no reciprocity, that would become an expensive trip.



Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Given the interstate nature of some dual purpose motorcyclists, it seems to me that the state's treating this activity as they do fishing licenses as you point out Mike, is really an interference with interstate commerce. I believe this is the reason states recognize out of state motor vehicle licensing and is why you don't have to get some kind of out of state license to enter each new state while traveling in a validly licensed vehicle on public roads. It seems to me that if you have a valid OHV permit issued in one state, that permit should be valid in all other states subject of course to the unique use requirements of each individual state. I suspect it doesn't work that way (except for those states with reciprocity) because no one has challenged it and/or not really thought about it. I like your idea Mike of a federal permit which would at least take care of the issue on federally controlled lands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
Actually the TW200 is a dual sport fully legal for use on the highway. I live in AZ and I was on the fence for a long time about whether or not to get the ohv sticker. I think you could beat a ticket in court every time based on how the law is worded. However, I paid the $25 just to avoid the hassles and it has already paid off once.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
FYI: I'm a ranger for the BLM in Wyoming. If your bike is licensed in any state you do not neen an ORV sticker. If it is NOT licensed, yu MUST purchase a sticker each year, $!) at any bike shop and alot of sporting goods stores. The license is good from any state. The stickers are a must for quads, 4wheelers, bikes or 6wheelers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Today I got an expired reg. notice for the TW. I pulled the reg off the TW. I bought it on the 10th of Jan 2011, It expired on on 15 of Jan 2011.



I called the state office. It took 50 minutes to talk to a real person. I asked her if all reg only last 5 days. She laughed and asked when I bought it. Somebody again goofed at reg. She said she would fix it for me and said the new sticker and reg. paper work.



Used up 50 minutes of my cell phone minutes for someone else's goof in government.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Here in sunny Fla.I had to pay north of $350 to register my 2008....state sales tax...title (more for a paper title )..tag etc. My state really soaks it to you. BTW Gunner is correct ( you can ride/drive any legal vehicle on numbered roads ) VMMV...

Joe Q.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
FYI: I'm a ranger for the BLM in Wyoming. If your bike is licensed in any state you do not neen an ORV sticker. If it is NOT licensed, yu MUST purchase a sticker each year, $!) at any bike shop and alot of sporting goods stores. The license is good from any state. The stickers are a must for quads, 4wheelers, bikes or 6wheelers.
Gunner, is the sticker not required for off road use anywhere in Wyoming or just on BLM land? Does that same rule apply to BLM land in states other than Wyoming? Thanks.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top