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I went for the maintenance plan when I bought my 09 2.5 years ago, and I recently went to do my first oil change on this bike. The oil drain plug is completely seized up. I used a 19mm 6-point ratchet, as per the official "how to change your own oil" thread, and it just chewed the bolt up. I switched to vice grips--no dice. I realized, after putting a ridiculous amount of pressure on the thing, that I should ask which direction I should be turning it. You never know; sometimes the ol' lefty-lucy, righty-tighty saying is incorrect. I've pulling it counter-clockwise.



So, once I know which way to turn, I need to know how to handle a very stuck, very damaged bolt.

Any help?



Thanks in advance.
 

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lefty-lucy
 

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I experienced a similar problem when changing the oil on my new (2010) TW. I suspect that the dealership mechanics over-tightened the plug. Still, nothing a bit of elbow-grease couldn't undo.
 

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You should give a bolt-out a try. I know you can grab them at sears. It's just a socket that'll cut into the bolt head and grip really well. You'll probably want to heat the bolt, then hammer your bolt-out on there, and loosen with an impact wrench. They've worked well for me. Just don't go crazy hammering it on. Go up a size if it is incredibly tight, or you might crack your case.
 

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You should give a bolt-out a try. I know you can grab them at sears. It's just a socket that'll cut into the bolt head and grip really well. You'll probably want to heat the bolt, then hammer your bolt-out on there, and loosen with an impact wrench. They've worked well for me. Just don't go crazy hammering it on. Go up a size if it is incredibly tight, or you might crack your case.


Excellent. Thank you assquatch (lol), and others. Think I'll order my replacement plug right now.



Yeah, it's insanely tight.
 

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Been here done this
Ended up using the chisel and hammer method and ordered a new plug and a bunch of gaskets. I was amazed how stuck it was. Didn't cause any damage thankfully to the threads getting it out. I was fairly embarrassed, I have experienced stuck oil plugs in automobiles twice so I am not sure why I should be surprised it happened on a motorcycle,
 

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I experienced a similar problem when changing the oil on my new (2010) TW....


When I changed the oil on my 2010 TW at 250 mi I found the same thing. I could hardly remove the filter cover that the factory gorilla tightened. But, for me, no damage done.



John
 

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I had the same thing happen to me, I was using a crescent wrench to try and crank her open but was just chewing up the plug (and a couple knuckles banging off of anything and everything). Best thing I found to use was the tool in your tool kit pouch that comes with the bike (now there's a crazy idea). It fits perfectly and no slipping and sliding off of the drain. good luck...
 

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It's not possible to soak it first in some sort of lubricating oil because it's sideways, and on some bikes, upside down, but an impact wrench is useful to break it free and loosen it. A two sided crescent wrench will only strip the head, you need a good fitting 6 sided wrench to avoid that, like what comes in the tool kit to fit properly. You could try to hit that wrench with a hammer to break it free and twist it off, or use a socket wrench to fit the head better. Working upside down doesn't help much as a lot of these oil drain plugs are on the bottom of the pan.
 

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I just changed my oil a few weeks ago. The cap was extremely tight too. I initially used a crescent wrench, but stopped before I completely stripped it out.



*** Just as a side note, I was reminded how fun it was taking off the oil plug screw was. I went to Harbor Freight and picked up a 25" 1/2" breaker bar to make it a less painful.

With the better leverage, it came right off and I was able to salvage the cap.



The breaker bar only cost me $11.99.
 

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When I changed the oil on my 2010 TW at 250 mi I found the same thing. I could hardly remove the filter cover that the factory gorilla tightened. But, for me, no damage done.



John


Me too! And I had tightened the oil plug myself using a torque wrench at the correct setting (31). I wonder if it has a tendency to get more stuck with time and heat. Next time I'm going to reduce the torque value from 31 to 28 ft./lbs. I've not had any problem with the filter cover bolts at 7.2 ft./lbs.



Manual says take a good look at the O-ring: Good advice! Maybe just replace it every other year or so for getting stiff.
 

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Counter clock wise is loosen.....when you have a tight nut,bolt etc. use a hammer on the wrench and LIGHTLY tape,repeatedly......if that doesn't work,put some penetrating oil the best you can where the nut,bolt etc. contacts the bike.
 

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I have done all the oil changes on the bike since it was new. The first oil change was no problem, and I was the one that put the cap back on. I have done oil changes on many engines over the last 62 years, but clearly did something different to this plug when I tightened it back up. I have all sorts of neat tools and realizing the cap was aluminium I saw the potential for 'trouble'. Guess what, the tools for my 2ed oil change were a chisel and a hammer. I can't imagine I even got close to 30psi torque, but then did not use a torque wrench (I have 3). After removing, I cleaned up the old cap with the groove from the chisel and as well purchased a new cap. Still use the old cap as I figure, if it'froze-up' once it can happen again. If worse comes to worse, the chisel works and a nice groove is there when needed. Gerry
 

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http://tw200forum.co...1/ShowPost.aspx



Summary from above link



Like mrlmd said

Only use 6 point socket or box end not 12 point.







&

TCAS tried this

Put some tape in the bottom of the socket to keep the JB Weld inside, then fill the socket up about half full and placed over the drain plug head, duct tape it in place then wedged my rubber hammer against the socket and the garage floor to hold it in place.



24 hours later I plugged in the socket wrench to the epoxyed on Socket an turned the plug off like butter. I did add some weight to the bike a few ounces for the socket but it was way cheaper than a new drain plug. I don't recall the member who did this trick first but thanks a bunch.
 

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WOW!! that is much better than using a chisel
.. Thanks for the refresher on the sockets. The 12 points are great when getting connected is a problem. No doubt in my mind, since I decided to use it (my mind), the six point is perfect for the oil cap. Thanks, Gerry
 

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Discussion Starter #18
http://tw200forum.co...1/ShowPost.aspx



Summary from above link



Like mrlmd said

Only use 6 point socket or box end not 12 point.







&

TCAS tried this

Put some tape in the bottom of the socket to keep the JB Weld inside, then fill the socket up about half full and placed over the drain plug head, duct tape it in place then wedged my rubber hammer against the socket and the garage floor to hold it in place.



24 hours later I plugged in the socket wrench to the epoxyed on Socket an turned the plug off like butter. I did add some weight to the bike a few ounces for the socket but it was way cheaper than a new drain plug. I don't recall the member who did this trick first but thanks a bunch.


That is a great trick!
 
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