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Discussion Starter #1
You know what they say about idle hands...



So I recently acquired a spare 144 engine block (among other engine bits) from a member on a Ranchero forum I belong to. I wasn't sure what I was going to do with the block, but I knew I wanted to keep it should I ever need to replace the one in my Ranhero...and my wife mentioned that it would be nice to have a coffee table in our living room...yeah, you guessed it. Meet the 144 coffee table!











After I got the block back from sandblasting it looked to be re-useable so I made no modifications to it; if it needs to be re-used in an actual car it just un-bolts from the base it's sitting on and takes a trip to a machine shop.







I made the base myself (twice, first one wasn't right) and after I'd started building legs I had the idea to re-use the original pistons as legs. They were in pretty rough shape, luckily my son-in-law Luke was able to get them shot-peened where he works which made them look like new



Before:





The block was also in rough shape but my local sand blaster was able to clean it up nicely:





The glass top was custom made by a local glass company (who chipped it so after the holiday's it goes back).



It was a fun little project. I painted it 'Old Ford Blue' (seemed to fit, I have an old Ford and it's engine is also blue). I have a very understanding wife who had no problems with an engine block coffee table moving into the house so that's good.



Part of this project was wanting to build a unique piece for my living room (we are gear head's in this house after all) another part was not wanting to have an old engine block laying around and another part was to honor a recently-deceased family member who was known for building six-cylinder racing engines; I think he would have dug this thing.



Sorry for the off-topic post, just thought I'd share. Now back to TW's!



Kevin
 

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That's really cool. I especially like the piston feet.



How do you get the glass to stay on the block?


I'm interested to hear what he did, but I know I would use some cork gasket material. Maybe a spot or four of RTV sealer to keep it from sliding.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
How do you get the glass to stay on the block?


Thanks for the kind words!



Good question about the glass top. Honestly the glass gave me the most headaches. What size should it be? How thick should it be? Where to get it made? How to secure it to the block in such a way that it would be secure? Sandblasting and having the top made were the only two things I didn't do myself in my garage.



I'd thought about using double-sided tape (still might) but for now I'm just using six of the small cork things which came stuck all over the glass. Their sticky on one side and cork on the other; sticky-side I stuck to the block, cork-side against the glass. So far so good. We had people over tonight and things were set on the glass and it never moved.



I went with a small glass top (32"L x 15"W) mainly because I was worried that a very large top would make the whole thing too top-heavy and unsteady. It's 1/4" thick for no other reason than that's what the guy at the glass shop said the majority of their glass-top coffee tables used. It took four days to get the glass made (three more than I was told it would) and then somehow it got damaged between the time they called to tell me it was ready and the time when my wife got there to pick it up (they fessed-up that one of their employees had bumped it). Other than a small chip they did do a good job though.



Kevin
 

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Nice work, Kev.
 

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You have a Great Wife Kev. The cat looks a little unsure. I put a 144 in an old Econoline I got from a school district auction. Kind of wish I went with the 200.



 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is my first Missing Link Award, thanks MrGizmo!!!



Yes the 144 will never go down in history as being one of Ford's best engines (it's not) however the one I have in my '60 Ranchero is original to my car (the car has been in my wife's family since 1961) and until six weeks ago it had never had it's head off! It's a very industrial, low-revving motor, however most people swap them for the larger (and more popular) 200CI Ford Six or a small V8. For the way we drive our car (mostly around town) the 144 is sufficient. It's a dirt-simple design that reminds me of my air-cooled VW engines, or one of our TW's for that matter!



Kevin
 
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