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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many does this make?! At least 6 now. If my bike sits for more than a month, the pilot jet plugs up. I've tried fuel additives, it's stored in the garage and it's fresh fuel, a high quality fuel filter even. (meaning the fuel is less than 6 months old) Went to go for a nice fall ride this after noon and it would start fine with choke, but not run in anything but full choke. I knew right away what it was. Pulled the pilot jet and it was completely plugged. I replaced it, having bought 12 of the 35 size pilots from aliexpress for $10.50 (link below) along with 4 each 126, 128 and 130 main jets. It's easy to change, now that I got the process down; pull the seat, pull the tank, loosen the carb boots. fish the throttle cables out of the cable loop under the tank and roll the carb over to the shifter side. I use a wobble headed allen screw, pull the bowl and a long straight blade screwdriver to get the old jet out. Reverse the process and it fires up without a hitch. Runs great! Well, until next time. I think I'll start draining the bowl with the drain screw.
While I was at it, I inspected the needle. It had what I would describe as a rust ring on it. It scraped off with my finger nail, not leaving a mark, so maybe it was dirt. I've seen this before and I don't know where that's coming from either. Fresh air filter with a little oil settling I used a rag to sop up. But the problem was the pilot for sure.

If anyone has these symptoms; runs on choke, won't off choke even warmed up, then the pilot is part or fully plugge and needs to be serviced or, better, replaced.

Here's the link to the pilot jets;
(12pcs pilot jet / pack)SRZ150 JYM150 motorcycle taikai carburetor pilot jet TK SVR MV vice injectors Nozzle(Digital label)|injector reconditioning|nozzle showerinjector clean - AliExpress

Here's the link to the main jets;
(12 pcs/pack)carburetor main jet Teikei TK JOG hexagonal main injectors Nozzle YM jets(Digital label display)(choose your size)|nozzle plunger|nozzle dieselcarburetor brands - AliExpress
 

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I had that problem with a xr 50 i had for the kid's seemed like every time they wanted to use it I would have to clean the pilot jet not sure if I ever tried running it out of gas it might help works on the mower for winter storage. I did switch to ethanol free gas and it did seem to help. Last time I cleaned it it was running good and I sold it the kids had outgrown it anyway.
 

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With respect, you've probably checked all this stuff but I'll suggest them anyway fwiw. There's only a few things it can be.

Maybe it's not coming in with the fuel. It could be coming in with the air. Are you sure you aren't sucking dirt in somewhere Ski? With an old Beemer one time I was in a lot of dust and the dirt got past the air filter - not thorough the element, around it. That's because it wasn't seated properly - an after market unit that pooped out of place when the box was buttoned up. I greased the edges with hi temp wheel bearing grease and it fixed the problem.

Another place is at the manifold. Maybe try put some grease both sides where the carb mounts to the manifold too. Could there a hole or crack in the rubber? You have been twisting on it to clear your jets quite a bit. When the mc is running squirt some gas at all those manifold mating surfaces where air could get in. You know... if your engine revs up - bingo. Air leak.

Is the fuel filter precipitating crud into your carb? One way that could happen is if you used the filter once, took it off and accidentally put it back on the wrong way round pushing crud out of the filter and into your carb. Or could that filter be simply self destructing on you, clogging up the jet? Just for good measure and remove doubt I'd change the fuel filter altogether. Maybe it's faulty.

I'm not familiar with the California models and their extra pollution gear, where it goes, etc. Could that gear have anything to do with any of this, per chance?

I feel your pain...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
With respect, you've probably checked all this stuff but I'll suggest them anyway fwiw. There's only a few things it can be.

Maybe it's not coming in with the fuel. It could be coming in with the air. Are you sure you aren't sucking dirt in somewhere Ski? With an old Beemer one time I was in a lot of dust and the dirt got past the air filter - not thorough the element, around it. That's because it wasn't seated properly - an after market unit that pooped out of place when the box was buttoned up. I greased the edges with hi temp wheel bearing grease and it fixed the problem.

Another place is at the manifold. Maybe try put some grease both sides where the carb mounts to the manifold too. Could there a hole or crack in the rubber? You have been twisting on it to clear your jets quite a bit. When the mc is running squirt some gas at all those manifold mating surfaces where air could get in. You know... if your engine revs up - bingo. Air leak.

Is the fuel filter precipitating crud into your carb? One way that could happen is if you used the filter once, took it off and accidentally put it back on the wrong way round pushing crud out of the filter and into your carb. Or could that filter be simply self destructing on you, clogging up the jet? Just for good measure and remove doubt I'd change the fuel filter altogether. Maybe it's faulty.

I'm not familiar with the California models and their extra pollution gear, where it goes, etc. Could that gear have anything to do with any of this, per chance?

I feel your pain...
Thanks for the suggestions Paddy. I tried those things;
The air filter first; there was a little motor oil in it soaking the bottom of the filter, which I replaced last year. It's probably oil from when I soaked and installed it, but I've heard these bikes will regurgitate some oil back up to the air filter, so I'll keep an eye on that. There were a few nuggets of dog food in the air box. Damn cats! Fat AND lazy bastards! The dog food didn't disturb anything, no filter chew or any of that, just some nuggets down in there.
I squirted starter fluid around the carb, no rev. I then squirted it into the air cleaner and it stalls, meaning there isn't an air leak to support extra fuel. I learned that adding fuel to the intake, if it revs you have an air leak, if it stumbles, you don't.
The fuel filter is one of those brass element things. Here's a link;
AmazonSmile: COMPACT 90DEG. FUEL FILTER 1/4" : Automotive
I busted it off removing the fuel line from the tank and need to replace it. Thought I had 2 but my spare is a paper element style without the 90 degree housing. I put that on, just have to route the much longer fuel line around the top of the shock to keep it from kinking. I have a XT225 tank and it's a tight fit between petcock and carb.

I was surprised to see crud on the needle that was a ring around it. I've seen that on my 2 stroke dirt bikes due to dust/dirt ingested, but never on this bike. It was almost like it was rust, but easily scraped off with my fingernail and didn't leave any damage. I think the needle is either aluminum or stainless so could not be rust unless it's from the tank. Checked tank and it has a light coating of rust near the top, but no debris in the bottom of any kind. Pulled the petcock as well and did a through inspection. It's not really rust, it's stained is a better description of the upper part of the tank. With the petcock filter and a good in-line filter, should not be causing these problems.
I'm just glad it's an easy fix now that I have the procedure down.
BTW, Brian (I think it was him) sent me a few dental files used to clean out root canal dentine. They are a little over sized and I first tried cleaning this one. I got too aggressive and it ran too rich so I then replaced it with one from Alliexpress stash. That one works perfect! So I can fully endorse those things. Size 35 from Allie whereas I used 34 from Yamaha in the past. Pilot screw set for 2 full turns out. 1.5 turns will stall on throttle wick off idle with bike in gear and clutch in. (As opposed to being in neutral) 2.5 turns out will bog a little. 2 turns is perfect; in gear, clutch in, from idle I can WOT wick and it revs clean with only the slightest of hesitation which all CV carbs will do.
 

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...... If my bike sits for more than a month, the pilot jet plugs up. I've tried fuel additives, it's stored in the garage and it's fresh fuel, a high quality fuel filter even. .......
Ski Pro, I have found the same thing.... 30 days of sitting and I had to attend to the carb.

I did the same as you: non-ethanol fuel, additives, new fuel filters.

Besides the pilot jet, I found one or two of the holes in the emulsifier were clogged:



I have also found this in the float bowl:



Where does this come from?

It has to get through the filter in the petcock, the external fuel filter and the filter atop the the needle valve seat. Not likely all those particle made it through 3 filters.

Years ago I discussed this with Lzrdbrth (on the phone), and we both suspected that it comes from the unfiltered air coming through the "air vent". Russ ended up putting a fuel filter from a weed eater on the end of the air vent hose to act as an "air" filter..... I don't know the results......I started looking for a different bike... ;)

Never found out if this solved the dirt particle problem. Something to think about...

jb
 
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Thanks for the suggestions Paddy. I tried those things;
The air filter first; there was a little motor oil in it soaking the bottom of the filter, which I replaced last year. It's probably oil from when I soaked and installed it, but I've heard these bikes will regurgitate some oil back up to the air filter, so I'll keep an eye on that. There were a few nuggets of dog food in the air box. Damn cats! Fat AND lazy bastards! The dog food didn't disturb anything, no filter chew or any of that, just some nuggets down in there.
I squirted starter fluid around the carb, no rev. I then squirted it into the air cleaner and it stalls, meaning there isn't an air leak to support extra fuel. I learned that adding fuel to the intake, if it revs you have an air leak, if it stumbles, you don't.
The fuel filter is one of those brass element things. Here's a link;
AmazonSmile: COMPACT 90DEG. FUEL FILTER 1/4" : Automotive
I busted it off removing the fuel line from the tank and need to replace it. Thought I had 2 but my spare is a paper element style without the 90 degree housing. I put that on, just have to route the much longer fuel line around the top of the shock to keep it from kinking. I have a XT225 tank and it's a tight fit between petcock and carb.

I was surprised to see crud on the needle that was a ring around it. I've seen that on my 2 stroke dirt bikes due to dust/dirt ingested, but never on this bike. It was almost like it was rust, but easily scraped off with my fingernail and didn't leave any damage. I think the needle is either aluminum or stainless so could not be rust unless it's from the tank. Checked tank and it has a light coating of rust near the top, but no debris in the bottom of any kind. Pulled the petcock as well and did a through inspection. It's not really rust, it's stained is a better description of the upper part of the tank. With the petcock filter and a good in-line filter, should not be causing these problems.
I'm just glad it's an easy fix now that I have the procedure down.
BTW, Brian (I think it was him) sent me a few dental files used to clean out root canal dentine. They are a little over sized and I first tried cleaning this one. I got too aggressive and it ran too rich so I then replaced it with one from Alliexpress stash. That one works perfect! So I can fully endorse those things. Size 35 from Allie whereas I used 34 from Yamaha in the past. Pilot screw set for 2 full turns out. 1.5 turns will stall on throttle wick off idle with bike in gear and clutch in. (As opposed to being in neutral) 2.5 turns out will bog a little. 2 turns is perfect; in gear, clutch in, from idle I can WOT wick and it revs clean with only the slightest of hesitation which all CV carbs will do.
Got some good ideas from the ZX forums. They mentioned to verify gunk/debris to empty some gas from the fuel tap into a jar and let it settle and see if anything shows up at the bottom.

They also mentioned checking to make sure none of the O-Rings are starting to desintegrate.

Lastly, the guy struggling with only his pilot jet clogging just realized there was some invisible crap in his carb he just didn't see and went back and cleaned, sources some new jets too.

Just trying to come up with some other ideas for ya, Ski.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ski Pro, I have found the same thing.... 30 days of sitting and I had to attend to the carb.

It has to get through the filter in the petcock, the external fuel filter and the filter atop the the needle valve seat. Not likely all those particle made it through 3 filters.

Years ago I discussed this with Lzrdbrth (on the phone), and we both suspected that it comes from the unfiltered air coming through the "air vent". Russ ended up putting a fuel filter from a weed eater on the end of the air vent hose to act as an "air" filter..... I don't know the results......I started looking for a different bike... ;)

Never found out if this solved the dirt particle problem. Something to think about...

jb
I'm thinking an aquarium air bubbler stone might work;

Liquid Blue Fluid Rectangle Plastic bottle
 
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I have this exact issue. I ride my TW's religiously. It doesn't seem to matter if they sit for a week, month or several months. One Tw is worse than the other for some reason. I'm pretty sure it's all about the additives and partial alcohol in it now.

I checked the stock #31 pilot jet and it's ~.012" in diameter and a #34 is ~.013". I've never had any of the emulsion holes become clogged. Just the main one.
I also have many of them on hand and I've opened a #31 up to ~.014" and a #34 to ~.015".
Just for reference the cross or emulsion holes are ~.030".

I'm now using a pilot jet with a ~.015" ID and have not had a clogging issue since, about three months of on and off riding.
One other thing to watch out for is a deteriorating rubber plug in the carb passage between the main and pilot jets. No filter is going to catch any particles that might come from that falling apart.
 

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ski, I seem to remember you having this trouble from a tank coating (dragons blood I think?) that was not working with fuel additives like seafoam. is that the same tank?
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ski, I seem to remember you having this trouble from a tank coating (dragons blood I think?) that was not working with fuel additives like seafoam. is that the same tank?
Yes, but the coating was all removed last year. Good memory BTW ☺
 
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I wonder if there is some residual coating still around.... the symptoms sound so similar.
 

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"I wonder if there is some residual coating still around.... the symptoms sound so similar."

I copied this public domain article for y'all from the internet. It seems to be the perfect explanation to our jet clogging problem. I haven't edited anything out, so please forgive me if you find it too much of a read.

Understanding Ethanol-Related Fuel Problems
Written by: Biker Chad



We all have seen the signs and stickers on gas pumps everywhere stating that there is 10% ethanol added to our gasoline. This Mixture of 90% gasoline and 10% ethanol is often referred to as E10 or “gasohol”. We usually just fill our tanks up and go not ever giving a thought to what effects burning the added ethanol in our engines may have. Does ethanol damage engines? Do you lose power, performance, and MPG with ethanol? I have been asked these questions and many more at our bike shop numerous times. In this article I will try to answer these questions and tell you how to combat ethanol related engine problems. So read on and study hard, there may be a pop quiz later.​
Why is ethanol added to our fuel in the first place?

The answer to this question goes back to amendments made to the “Clean Air Act” in 1990. This amendment stated that gasoline be oxygenated to cut down on Carbon Monoxide emissions. The first additive that was used to do this was Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MBTE). MBTE had a very strong turpentine smell and it turned out to be proven to contaminate ground water. Little is known about the long term health hazards from exposure to MBTE contamination in our water. MBTE had been used for this as early as 1979 in some states as a replacement for the lead in leaded gasoline, however due to MBTE polluting ground water it was replaced by ethanol around the year 2000. I worked at a small engine repair shop when MBTE was added to our gasoline. Our shop went from one full time and one full time mechanic to three mechanics working overtime to keep up with repairing damaged engines. It should be noted that gasoline with MBTE and gasoline with ethanol should not be mixed as this can cause precipitates that clog fuel filters and carburetors.
Are there positive effects of ethanol in our gasoline?

Additives like MBTE or ethanol are used as an Oxygenator in gasoline. Adding an Oxygenate like MBTE or Ethanol into gas pump fuelgasoline reduces Carbon Monoxide emissions thus reducing pollution but this reduction in pollution is really only noticed in engines that have a carburetor and are not computer controlled by a “closed loop” EFI computer system. Any vehicle that has Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) uses at least one oxygen sensor to analyze the exhaust allowing the vehicle’s computer to make adjustments to control emissions so they benefit very little from an ethanol mixed fuel as far as an emissions reduction goes. The main reason ethanol stems from the Bush administration’s push to reduce America’s dependency on foreign oil so the result is 10% ethanol is added to dilute gasoline to cut down on the amount of gasoline consumed to reducing the amount of foreign oil consumed.
What are the negative effects of using ethanol in our engines?

There are five major problems that I know of from ethanol in our gasoline;

  1. Debris in fuel / premature fuel breakdown. It is almost impossible to empty all of the fuel from any engine system so there is always old fuel somewhere in any fuel system. Straight gasoline starts to deteriorate around 30-60 days and ethanol fuels break down even faster than straight gasoline. When gasoline breaks down leaving gum and varnish in fuel tanks, fuel lines, carburetors, etc. Ethanol is also a great cleaner of gums, varnishes, dirt and the rust that water in the fuel creates. That is why ethanol is used in almost every bottle of carb / injector cleaner on the market. So when you fill up your tank you introduce fresh ethanol to run through your fuel system and it will dissolve the deposits running all that crud through the engine’s fuel system clogging fuel filters, injectors, and carburetors. Clogged fuel filters will drop fuel pressures telling the regulator to work the electric fuel pump harder to keep the fuel pressure up. This will burn out fuel pumps. Gummed up carburetors and fuel injectors all lead to poor performance and all of this leads to hefty repair bills. Considering you never really know how long the E10 sits at the refinery in a holding tank before it gets transported to the pump station to sit in the underground storage tank just to be purchased by you to sit in your tank before being burned in the engine, break down of the E10 gasohol fuel can be a real issue.
  2. Water in fuel. Pure gasoline does not absorb water but ethanol will. Ethanol is hydrophilic this means that it pulls moisture from the air and bonds with it. In ideal conditions E10 gasohol will keep roughly .5% water by volume is suspended in gasoline. Our fuel tanks and fuel storage cans are hardly ideal conditions as they need to be vented allowing the ethanol to absorb more moisture from the atmosphere or in the form of condensation. Ethanol never truly bonds with gasoline molecules it is a loose mixture at best so when the threshold of .5% water is exceeded or the E10 gasohol mixture cools off every night the water / ethanol solution falls out of suspension in the gasoline. Oil and gasoline float on water as they are lighter than water so the water /ethanol mixture will stay at the bottom of your fuel tank. The process of the water and ethanol separating from the gasoline and sinking to the bottom is called “Phase Separation”. Phase Separation is a real problem because the water from the bottom of the tank is sucked up and sent to the engine it causes a lean condition raising the engine temperature causing valve damage, carburetor, fuel lines and electronic fuel injection pumps pull fuel from the bottom of the tanks where the ethanol / water mix stays and water doesn’t burn well in the engine leading to premature engine / fuel system corrosion and poor engine performance. It gets worse, ethanol and water mix in E10 gasoline is a breeding ground for microbes like bacteria and fungi which just adds to the corrosion and debris in your fuel system.
  3. Loss of power, octane rating, performance and mileage from E10 gasohol. Contrary to what most people believe, higher octane gas does not make your engine more powerful. Only if your engine is built for performance or racing with a higher compression rating do you will need to use a higher octane gasoline. Your vehicle manufacturer tells you what octane rating to use depending on your vehicle’s requirements. This information can be found in the vehicle owner’s manual, on the fuel door or gas cap. At the pump you typically have three choices of octane ratings use gasoline that has an octane ratings from 87 (lowest), 89 (midgrade), and 91 or 92 (premium) this is due to a few factors, but it is mainly relevant to the compression rating of your engine. The higher the compression the higher the octane required. This is due to the fact that gasoline and air mixture heats up as the piston moves on the compression stroke gasoline will ignite before the spark plug fires. This is called pre-ignition and it will damage the engine. Octane prevents this by slowing down the burn rate from an early damaging explosion to a slower more controlled burn. Pure ethanol has an octane rating of 113, so adding ethanol will raise the octane rating of gasoline. The gasoline blender has to take this into consideration and uses a lower octane base gasoline so when the ethanol is added you don’t get a higher octane fuel. Now what happens is this; you purchase E10 gasohol with an octane rating of 87, phase separation occurs and as the ethanol sinks to the bottom of the tank the octane rating in the gasoline actually gets lowered to around 82 to 84. This is too low for a gasoline powered engine to run efficiently and causes loss of power and engine damaging pre-ignition. Ethanol produces about 34% less energy than the same amount one gallon of gasoline so in an E10 mixture you will lose 3% – 5% of your horse power and MPG.
  4. Ethanol is corrosive. Ethanol is an excellent solvent and will clean all of the gunk and grime that an engine will accumulate but these same strong cleaning qualities can lead to trouble for your engine. As I had stated earlier in this article ethanol is a great cleaner and this alone can cause issues as it dislodges built up dirt sending harmful and filter clogging particles through your fuel system and engine. Ethanol is also a drying agent and can disintegrate plastic, rubber, some types of fiber glass, aluminum and magnesium. Ethanol is most corrosive to ferrous metals (metals that contain iron, such as steel). This corrosion leaves behind salt deposits and a jelly like substance, both of which can clog fuel filters, fuel pumps and carburetors. Ethanol also burns at a higher temperature than gasoline causing damage to pistons. Any car or truck that is not a “Flex Fuel” vehicle is most likely not equipped with ethanol resistant parts and even less small engines like lawn mowers; motorcycles etc. are equipped with ethanol resistant parts. Marine motors and ethanol just do not get along at all due to the high water content in their operating environment. Due to the high damage rate and risk of marine motors developing polluting gasohol leaks from ethanol damage, a lot of marinas are currently offering ethanol free gasoline. According to the FAA ethanol is forbidden in airplane fuels (excluding air craft licensed as experimental). Using E10 in 2 cycle outdoor power equipment (weed whackers, chainsaws, etc.) can seize motors and most manufacturers will not honor warranties on their equipment if E10 is used. E10 is bad enough, but if E15 is put into place we can expect severe damage to any vehicle not equipped like an E85 Flex Fuel vehicle. Please consider that the levels of ethanol are not closely monitored by most gas stations, but you can purchase inexpensive ethanol test kits to be sure the ethanol percentage is not over 10%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm with Paddy on this one. I think it's the fuel itself. I had this problem with the stock tank as well, so I don't think it's the tank or any liner used to coat after derusting a tank. I think something happens as the gas ages in the carb. Just to recap;
When I run my bike weekly, there isn't a problem. I can go months without any problem this way. If it sits for a month or more, there's at least a 50/50 chance it will have a clogged pilot jet. I mean the bike simply will not start or run on anything other than full choke. How can I turn off the bike, which is running perfect, let sit for 4 weeks or more, then upon start-up it suddenly has a plugged pilot jet? You can't unless it's the fuel that has metastasized into something while sitting around. I sometimes have this issue with 2 stroke lawn tools; chainsaw, weed-wacker, etc. I end up having to disassemble those carbs and clean as well. I can see the same sort of 'rust' looking deposits. Other motors I have no problems with. My generators for example. I can leave the fuel in for year and they start right up and run fine.
For some reason, probably because the pilot jet orifice is so tiny, the TW200's pilot plugs when sitting. So I've started a new routine; I'm going to drain the bowl after each ride and then start upt the bike to finish burning out the rest. Merely letting the bike run out of fuel by shutting off the petcock doesn't do it. There's still fuel in the carb. It's just low enough not to get sucked up by the jets is all. That practice I tried and ended up with a plugged pilot jet just as often as not running the carb dry. It's a pain to drain the bowl, but how else am I to keep from having to replace pilot jets so often?
 
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Who would have thunk it. Cleaning additives actually causing the problems we are trying to remedy? And just for kicks I just spiked my last tankful of gas with Sea Foam just for good measure.

Being that you are in California, Ski, I wonder if your gas is spiked heavier, with more ethanol than other places.

I've had gremlins that I wondered were fuel related too and mentioned winter fuel season as the possible cause. And now, after reading the article I posted I wonder if this incessant rattle I hear on and off which only occurs in higher gears under higher rpm load is pre-ignition after all. Why? Because of what the article mentions about ethanol diluting the fuel and reducing the actual octane rating significantly. Ski among others have re-jetted pilot and main jets to up their fuel mixture because their engines show evidence of lean running. Could this lean running issue also be gasohol related, octane diluting blues?

I cringe at the price but power saw mfr supply no alcohol gasoline in a little throw away screw top can for their products. I just may spring to buy a can of that and run it in my mc to see if it runs any better. At 50 - 1 I doubt the very small amount of oil in it will blow any blue in a 4 stroke engine, and I'll get a true idea of what no alcohol gas behaves like. Then too there are other sources for non spiked fuel in your own individual areas, but not around here, as far as I know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It is my understanding that lead was added to gas as an octane booster. It was removed because it harmed the environment which put out the search for another octane booster. MTBE didn't work because it can be smelled and tasted at extremely small amounts. In ground tanks were replaced but eventually the stuff was replaced with alcohol. Meaning that alcohol is an octane booster. My research shows that to be true.

How much octane does ethanol add?

When you mix 10 percent 113 octane ethanol with 85 octane gasoline it increases the octane two points to the normal 87 octane most consumers use. So the higher the ethanol content, the higher the octane. The octane rating for E15 (15% ethanol) is 88 octane and E85 (85% ethanol) is 108 octane.
It's easy to pull alcohol out of gas. Just add a few drops of water, shake and let it settle. The water/alcohol will settle to the bottom, it's heavier than petroleum. I've seen this many times over using just a mason jar and some gas with the humidity in the air. Let a jar of gas sit on the workbench for a couple hours and look see. There will be beads of water at the bottom. The gas changes color as well from a yellow tinge to a pinkish tinge.
But once you get the alcohol out, what you replace it with to get the octane rating back up to something the bike will happily run? I wonder about premium grade gas and pulling the alcohol out of that? If regular octane is boosted 2 points with 10% ethanol, then mid and premium would also be enhanced by 2%, making mid grade change from 89 to 87 and premium from 91 to 89 octane. Right? Once the ethanol is removed, then add Sea Foam or other cleaning additive that isn't aclohol based.
 

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We use Redex over here - https://www.holtsauto.com/redex/products/petrol-system-cleaner/ not as a fuel stabiliser, more as a carb cleaner. Add a cap full to a full tank, run the carb dry, park it up for a year or two, switch the fuel to “on” – slide carbs are fine within a minute, CV carbs within 5 minutes - tried, tested, and trusted (by me)

Recently, we have introduced E10 on the low octane stuff, 99 octane is still pumped at 5%, so I’m sticking with the good stuff. It’s got sod all to do with “fuel stabilisers”, it’s about Ethanol, and carb cleaning mixtures – octane at this point is irrelevant

E15 I wouldn’t touch with a barge pole …….
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Did some checking and there's a place near me that sells ethanol-free 92 octane for $9.50 a gallon. They pump it out of a 55 gallon drum into your can. Yes, that's about double what pump gas sells for, but if it saves the bike from carb issues, it would be worth it. I also want to use it for my lawn and garden equipment which tend to have carb issues as well. Especially the weed-wacker which is only used seasonally. The backpack blower is used often enough to not need the stuff. I'm headed over there today. Gonna pull the TW200 tank and drain it, then fill with this stuff.
Anyone have any suggestions on running 92 octane in a TW200? Any additive recommended or performance issues you care to pass along I should be made aware of when running 92? Thanks!
 

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Observation on checking the air filter suggestion:
Float bowl only sees possible introduction of possibly dirty air when disassembled, or when tank, petcock, fuel filter and fuel supply hose are all empty and dry and/or detached, or via the carb vent hose. So if the atmosphere is suspected source of debris in the float bowl or source of clogged jets then look at filtering the carb vent after first cleaning out the vent line. Other passegeways to float bowl see vacuum under engine operation so dirty air passing the air filter really doesn't have a way into the float bowl or fuel metering orifices. A clean air filter is nice but not really germane to the topic under discussion.
LZDBRTH had a nice analytical mind, his wisdom endures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Got my 5 gallon fuel jug filled with what turns out to be 91 octane non-ethanol fuel for $47.50.

Checking my log book, it was less than a tank of gas since my last TWO pilot jets were clogged! I flushed and filled the tank after each jet replacment, so it's not the same dirty fuel. It's clean fuel each time running through the petcock filter, the in-line filter and the float screen inside the carb. Gonna add a carb vent hose filter, but I replaced that hose last change-out and it's clean as a whistle. I want to also say all riding on those two pilot jets I changed out were on pavement, zero off road riding. It's the fuel. Everything else has been eliminated.
I'm surprised no one else in California is having this sort of trouble. Maybe no one else ever rides theirs? Ha! I'm just grateful I have the procedure down pat now and it's not a big job any longer.
 
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