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Looking to buy a pair of overpants. Who's wearing them out there? What brand and what model/style? Suggestions, opinions, reviews, etc. are all appreciated. Thanks
 

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Looking to buy a pair of overpants. Who's wearing them out there? What brand and what model/style? Suggestions, opinions, reviews, etc. are all appreciated. Thanks
It depends on how much weight and warmth you are desiring. I have a pair of thin wind breaker/waterproof ripstop nylon pants from REI (designed for hiking and skiing that I carry in my panniers all winter and wear when the wind is biting me. However I splurged last winter and bought a pair of overalls like a carpenter would wear (mine are Dickies but similar to the Cargill (or is it Carhill) insulated clothes made for working stiffs. I figured I didn't want the full coverall design as my jacket protected my upper body, but the legs and butt could definately need some insulation on those really bitey days. These were like 19 bucks at the local ALCO store.

I also wear gaiters like you would use cross country skiing to seal the ecotone between my boots and pant cuffs. They make a great difference in the winter months. Maybe some part of this winter fortification will meet your needs. Ride safely and warmly. Tom
 

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Looking to buy a pair of overpants. Who's wearing them out there? What brand and what model/style? Suggestions, opinions, reviews, etc. are all appreciated. Thanks


I have been wearing Tourmaster cortech overpants. They are plain, semi-water resistant, acceptable armor, and held up well when I hit the ground at 20mph. The pants kept me safe, did their job up until the bike hit me, but no pants would have protected me from that. They were cheap, I think I paid all of $120 for them. Can't find anything similar online right at the moment though. They have a full length zipper and zelcro closure down each leg but do not separate at the waist. No zipper at the waist for jacket attachment. There is one pocket on the left thigh and two slash pockets on each hip, all three close with velcro, none of which were even remotely water resistant. These pants did lose their minimal waterproofing quickly, but the rest held up well for a good long time. The leg zippers are just now starting to wear out. Aside from the zipper problem, these pants are still fully functional after being worn every day for 6 years, minus a few weeks every winter. Good deal!



This year I got a pair of Aerostich Darien pants because here in the lovely Pacific Northwest, it rains a lot.
The Darien pants are much stiffer, are quite thoroughly waterproof, and have better armor. They are indeed more expensive though, at about $300. I like them a lot, though I still go back to the well-broken-in Cortech pants when there's no threat of rain. The stiffness of the Darien pants may wear off, but it's slightly annoying for daily commute gear. The Darien pants are not warm enough, at least for where I live, to be riding year round in them. But they do very well in heavy rain. They also have full length zippers down each leg, separate at the waist with snaps, but have no velcro over the storm flap on the zippers. So far, that hasn't been a problem. I like that I can get these in grey instead of black, too. More visible. Pockets on the Darien pants are useless, deep slash pockets at the hips and deep straight pockets on the rear, none of which close. I really miss the front thigh pocket on my Cortech pants...

http://www.aerostich.com/darien-pants.html
 

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I've got a pair of these cheapos for $60.00 http://www.leatherup...rmor/93534.html

They have a bunch of different color options. I went with the matching jacket for that hi viz look.







Read the comments on the site, you have to order 1 or 2 sizes larger to get them over pants.



They work okay for me. I had to sew them a bit after a dog got hold of my leg a while back.
 

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Not sure what you are looking for. Water resistance with armor? Armor and mesh for warm weather riding? Lightweight rain pants with no armor?



Whatever you're looking for, New Enough is a great place to start looking.
 

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If it really chilly I wear a pair of Columbia wind/rain pants over my Olympia riding pants. It's all about the layers to keep you warm.
 

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I gave up on textile and convertible pants and jackets, with and without liners. Unless you buy the high dollar stuff, the liners are cheap vinyl, do not ventilate, and are very uncomfortable. On top of that, a waterproof liner means the mesh and/or textile and armor get soaked in dingy road spray. Gear should fit snug to keep the armor in place for maximum protection, and a properly fitted outfit without a liner would always be uncomfortably tight with a liner, and unbearably tight with wicking and insulating layers under the liner. Nothing I tried with a liner was really waterproof and windproof, either. On top of all the functional failures, most liners are not available separately, so if you break a zipper or get a tear the entire jacket is crap for cold and/or wet riding. This is simply unacceptable to someone who rides in all weather, 365 days a year.



So I got to thinking. (Uh-oh.) Why not use the mesh/textile and aromor as insulation? Switch from a waterproof and windproof layer inside the armor to a waterproof and windproof layer outside the armor. A polyester wicking layer, street clothes, mesh gear, and a good motorcycle rainsuit seems to be all I need for around town down to about freezing. On longer rides I add a $25 100% polyester jacket from Walmart between the mesh and rainsuit, and I'm good for all day.



Keeping feet, hands, and head warm become the chief concerns in colder weather and on longer rides. Waterproof insulated work boats a half size too big and two pairs of thermal socks take care of the feet. Hippo Hands and gloves with a windproof and waterproof outer 3-finger cover keep the hands good. I made a collar of the back of one of those polyester Walmart jackets when it got old, worn out. This covers my neck between the rain jacket and helmet and my chin, sealing cold air out of the helmet, yet allows easy head turning for checking adjacent lanes. So little ir comes up from the bottom of the helmet that I have to keep the chin vent open to avoid fogging the shield, and in slow traffic or at redlights I have to open the shield a bit to prevent fogging. I've done 400+-mile days at 50-55mph WFO due to headwinds, 22*F (5.5*C) when I left home, 38*F (3*C) in the afternoon, and back to 25*C (4*C) at my destination. When it gets really cold I stick chemical warmers on my boots and gloves. I've done several hours long highway rides in below freezing temps (11 to 17*F, -12 to -8*C) thus prepared.



One nice surprise I found when I changed to this system is that it has a VERY wide range of temperature. The air trapped in mesh serves as insulation AND ventilation. This promotes a more even temperature around the body. Not much in the way of warm spots (crotch, knees, armpits, elbows) overheating from lack of air movement, starting to perspire, then have that perspiration evaporate and steal body heat. This is a MAJOR improvement in cold weather comfort when the rainsuit vents are closed. Definately significantly more comfortable than a clammy vinyl liner. When the weather is wet and warm, the mesh holds the rainsuit off the skin and the rainsuit vents have a much easier time keeping cool and ventilated. Less of that icky sticky clammy feel is a good thing.



In a nutshell, one wicking layer, street clothes, one insulated jacket, mesh gear for summer, and a rainsuit is all I need for temperatures ranging from below freezing to 112*F (44*C). If you shop sales you can get a Motoboss AirSpeed jacket and pants (on sale at Cycle gear for $70 each), a good rainsuit sized to fit over gear ($80-100), and polyester wicking underwear ($30) and jacket ($25)for under $300, and it's all the gear you'll ever need for any but the most extreme weather conditions. Insulated jeans and shirt are simply icing on the cake.



With the windproof layer on the outside, my Olympia textile gear is warmer than my Motoboss mesh, but much heavier, stiffer, and localized warmer and cooler spots. Subbing the wonderful breathable Olympia liners for street clothes is awesome warm no matter what gear is worn over them
 

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Thor makes good offroad riding gear without being as pricey as Fox Racing stuff (and I find Thor stuff better made).



I bought a set of Thor "Ride" pants on closeout at work. They retail at something like $120 Canadian (probably 100 bucks US) and I've been more than pleased with them. I think odd sizes went on closeout (apparently a 30 waist is odd? lol) for 60 bucks or something.







They're water/wind proof other than at the zippers (they have zip open mesh vents), but you'll obviously still get your legs wet if you put your foot in a puddle. I also use these as rain pants on my street bike and they work VERY well in rain.
 
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