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Getting most parts on the TW powder coated satin black, wanted to continue the black theme across the who bike. So when it comes down the to forks to get them powder coated they will have to be disassembled. I think it would be easier to just paint them using a different method at home perhaps, although i want it to look good and not tacky. Was thinking plastidip, any suggestions?
 

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If you're getting most of the bike powder coated, I'd take the time to disassemble the forks. Yes, it can seem like an overwhelming task, but its really not too difficult. There are many parts, but you really can't mess it up as most parts only go in one way. You'll need to create a tool to remove the inside damper bolt. I made one up, but I've seen on here someone used a coupling nut (tall nut) and that was a great idea, cheap too.

But, if you don't want to take them apart, use the Plastidip. I've never used it myself but I've heard a lot about it. I'm curious how it would hold up on the front forks. If you don't do a lot of offroad, it should last. I painted mine and they get scratched from sticks and rocks from riding offroad.

Let us know what you decide.
 

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I sand blasted and then painted mine when I painted the tank. Came out really nice. I just sealed up and taped off anything I didn't want paint on or sand in.

0081.jpg

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Good luck.

Bart
 

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I sand blasted and then painted mine when I painted the tank. Came out really nice. I just sealed up and taped off anything I didn't want paint on or sand in.

View attachment 257

View attachment 258

Good luck.

Bart
I'm glad you shared the picture with your forks painted. When painting your forks, you don't need to paint the very top part where the boot coverers (like the picture), therefore, you don't need to dissasemble your forks and drain your oil.
 

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Yeah, just went to my local auto paint store and bought off the shelf matte black paint, single stage. This is the stuff. It says "flat" but it is not true flat, it has more of an eggshell or matte finish.

mIGNS6n9YkOxcpRW5UybFzA.jpg

Since I started with clean, sand blasted metal, I had to acid etch and then prime first. All together I think I spent $150 on the paint job. I painted the brake drum cover, the forks, the tank and the fork braket. I had the wheels, frame a few other misc parts powder-coated.

HTH - Bart
 

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Take the time to take the forks apart, depending on the age and use of the bike, they could probably use fresh oil and seals. Also, gives you the opportunity to upgrade them by getting springs that match your weight and/or adding cartridge emulators to improve the dampening....
 

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Yeah, my 2009 on had 1300 miles on it, but I still cleaned them up and put new oil in them. Its always a good idea to do this stuff when the bike is apart.

Bart
 

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Naaa, do it yourself. Its not that hard. You need a few tools is all, and if you are like me, I would rather spend the $400 on tools and learn than pay someone to do it.

Bart
 

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Good advice Bart

+1
 
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