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Discussion Starter #1
No I am not selling them. They are not even mine.

I was looking through the classified ads on Calguns.net and found them and was surprised by the price and thought I would share them and see if any one else was surprised.

Boa1.jpg
 

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I couldn't image those matching Colts being worth even close to that amount. I believe it was a misprint and I would say $3000 was the intended price.
 

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I couldn't image those matching Colts being worth even close to that amount. I believe it was a misprint and I would say $3000 was the intended price.
Hard to believe, I know. Well, here are a couple of other ads from the same guy and a 3rd one from gunbroker.com

15K Boa.jpg 7K Python.jpg 10.5K Boa.jpg
 

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Ridiculous is the only thing that comes to mind. I know Colts do bring higher prices generally but have no idea what the deal with these guns are. I have both S&W 686, 357 Mag L Frame in 6 inch and a 617, .22LR in 6 inch which is the spitting image and nearly identical guns to these Colts. Back in my competition shooting days I would put my Smith L frame against a Colt Python any day and won the matches many times so I just don't get the inflated prices of Colts.

GaryL
 

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That's about the going price for a Boa. I know the the original 1873 SAA go for more than that if they're in good condition.

The BOA was essentially a limited 'custom' gun from Colt. Compared to my Performance Center N frame S&W the colt custom guns I've tried operated much better with no or little work necessary. My S&W PC gun needed a lot of work to get it competitive and was not even close to being as smooth and accurate as the Colt 'custom' guns right from the factory. Don't get me wrong, I really like my S&W now that it's been reworked but it took time and $ to get it up to the level of a competitive gun. Now that the BOAs are no longer made they have gotten into the status of the 'legendary' gun like the original SAA.
 

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That's about the going price for a Boa. I know the the original 1873 SAA go for more than that if they're in good condition.

The BOA was essentially a limited 'custom' gun from Colt. Compared to my Performance Center N frame S&W the colt custom guns I've tried operated much better with no or little work necessary. My S&W PC gun needed a lot of work to get it competitive and was not even close to being as smooth and accurate as the Colt 'custom' guns right from the factory. Don't get me wrong, I really like my S&W now that it's been reworked but it took time and $ to get it up to the level of a competitive gun. Now that the BOAs are no longer made they have gotten into the status of the 'legendary' gun like the original SAA.
I had a S&W Model 19 Combat Masterpiece PPC gun and my Model 686 L frame both worked and built by a very well respected S&W armorer. Straight out of the box both of these guns are just OK. Once they have been worked and or built by a custom gunsmith they come to life. Keep in mind that none of the stock Colt or S&W wheel guns come from the factory ready for any type of serious competition shooting. The BOA guns were given some very special attention much the same as my S&W guns got. Not sure if S&W ever did any special action work such as the BOA guns from Colt but while involved in the PPC competition shooting there were a few S&W armorers that could make a Smith run right up against any of the Colts. Neither gun shoots any better or straighter than the other until they get some action work and cylinder timing work done. We did a lot of playing on the range with both guns in a Ranson Rest trying to determine accuracy from the various brands and never did find one that surpassed the other as long as all things in the guns were well adjusted. The question we were faced with every time back then was do you buy a S&W for around $300 or pay twice as much for the equal Colt gun when considering the stock guns sold at most shops. A BOA Colt Python would probably cost upwards of $1500 while a S&W L frame was around $325 and in the hands of a good smith could be made to be as smooth and accurate for a couple hundred extra at that time.

GaryL
 
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When the SHTF matching serial numbers will be worthless and the guns will become tools again. In my opinion its time to sell collector guns.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is not the sword, it is the swordsman. Smith or Colt or Ruger or Rossi or J.C. Higgins or High Standard or whatever doesn't matter if the shooter is truly competent.

The best trigger job on a stock out of the box Smith and Wesson revolver is to shoot it a few thousand times and dry fire it (not the rimfire) a few thousand more times. All the parts wear together and the action becomes silky smooth. Of course this means one has to take it apart and clean and oil the parts on a regular basis but it is worth the effort.
 

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I know the Pythons have kind of hit a collectors niche market. They are going for tens of thousands of dollars, mainly because they don't make them anymore.
 
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One my friends in our local USPSA club made a good point about guns that come out of the manufacture's performance shops. Basically they don't know who is going to shoot them and for what purpose. The manufacturer has to make sure the gun will work in a variety of conditions with any grade of ammo. They have to go boom from the very start. People complain about S&W Performance Center's quality control but I think they basically take some 'hot rod' parts and put together a basic comp gun which will be fine tuned by the user.

My S&W 929 worked fine when I ran the first 200 'break in' rounds through it but MOA was about 5" with jacketed bullets. Also the trigger pull was 11lbs. It still cycled just fine though and no fail to fires. Switched to lead bullets and total disaster. Barrel to cylinder gap was .002". OK for jacketed but lead bullets fowled the cylinder face and after 20rounds jammed. Had to open the gap to .004" but then found the end shake was off the scale causing the cylinder to still drag on the forcing cone. Sent it back to S&W and they stretched the yoke. that brought the end shake down to .003" -- still too much so I slipped in a .002" end shake shim. Now it has .004" gap with .001" of end shake. Will run all day shooting lead with no problems. Other big change was lighting the trigger spring and installing a lighter trigger return spring. Trigger is now 5lbs double action with a constant pull (no stacking) but I have to run light primers to make sure the light trigger will set them off. In addition loading 9mm cases with .358" lead bullets brought the MOA down to 1/2". That took me from DNF for the first match to one 1st and two 2nd place finishes in the next three matches. Looking forward to this upcoming season.

So what does all that have to do with anything :confused: IMO if your going to get a top of the line gun it can either be a collectors item (over time) and make your investment go up or be prepared to hot rod it and just spend more money.
 

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It is not the sword, it is the swordsman. Smith or Colt or Ruger or Rossi or J.C. Higgins or High Standard or whatever doesn't matter if the shooter is truly competent.

The best trigger job on a stock out of the box Smith and Wesson revolver is to shoot it a few thousand times and dry fire it (not the rimfire) a few thousand more times. All the parts wear together and the action becomes silky smooth. Of course this means one has to take it apart and clean and oil the parts on a regular basis but it is worth the effort.
You mention Rossi. A lot of folks put them down but I've been shooting a model 92 Rossi in cowboy action for the last 7 years and it works great! Did do some polishing and lighter springs but it was very smooth out of the box. Won several matches with it and can consistently finish in the top 5. When I let folks try it they're amazed at how smooth and accurate it is.
 
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