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Mike won the last contest, and he chose "Cemeteries. Preferably, OLD or out of the way ones.. Try to have a story for it as well." This should be a fun one. the rules are the same as last time.





#1. It must be your TW

#2. It must be a recent photo

#3. It must be about the topic picked by the last winner.

#4. It must be a "clean" photo

#5. You can only submit one photo per contest



Have fun!! submissions will be taken until saturday night.
 

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Eldridge Blackhorse Cemetery. Outside of Baker, Nevada. The Eldridge family name is one of the earliest european settlers in this region. Wheeler Peak is framed by the cemetery entrance (Great Basin National Park).





 

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Jellico Community Cemetery

Located off US Highway 84 West on South Houston County Road 9, in the Jellico Community of Houston County, Alabama. There are a large number of unmarked graves in the cemetery.​

Sources for this listing are: Tombstone Transcriptions For All White Cemeteries, Houston County, Alabama (copied November 1956 by Adrene G. Dean and sent to Hayes on 9 November 1956), legible tombstones, obituaries, death certificates, numerous relatives of those buried here, and probate information from the Dale County Courthouse in Ozark, Alabama and Houston County Courthouse in Dothan, Alabama.​

Directions: From Ross Clark Circle in Dothan, get on US Highway 84 West, go approximately 9 miles, turn left on South Houston County Road 9. Go approximately ¼ mile, will pass Piney Grove Assembly of God Church before coming to Winslette Chapel United Methodist Church. The cemetery is across the road from this church. The cemetery does not "belong" to this church, but to the Jellico Community. There is a monument in the cemetery stating "Jellico Community Cemetery, Established 1819, Erected In Memory Of Muriel Ballard."​








More <a href="http://photobucket.com/iMikeG">HERE
 

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CLOVER CEMETERY



Located between the small towns of Williamsburg and Bethel in rural Ohio on St Rt. 133. Final resting place of a Civil War Medal of Honor recipient John H. Wageman. Although he was severely wounded he refused to be carried off the battle field at Petersburg VA. until he had fired all the cartridges in his possession.



Walking through this cemetery tonight the earliest burial date I saw was 1830 and the latests was 2005. There are many headstones that share the same names. Generation after generation of families have been buried beside loved ones who have gone before them. Many of those names carved into the stones are the same names on the road signs I follow riding through the corn and soybean fields of the small family farms. With the rolling hills, shady valleys and good neighbors I can see why people would want to put down roots and raise a family here. I was amazed and saddened to see how many little lives didn't get a chance to be realized. I saw a dozen or more markers for newborns, infants or very young children. It's heartbreaking.



 

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This is the cemetery for the town of Pescadero, California. It seems to be divided into Protestant and Catholic sections with different names for each section but you can't tell where one ends and the next one starts.



Some of the tombstones date back to the 1800's. Many members of the same family are buried there with dates from the 1800's to the present. I guess if you are born here you never leave.



I also found a grave of a Marine that died in 2006. Another grave looked like they had just shoveled in the dirt. Many of the tombstones stated the deceased was a World War II veteran. Many grave sites were covered with concrete pads which I guess was done to make sure they were never dug up.



The town is almost 2 miles from the ocean, which is due west. The town is located about half way between San Francisco and Santa Cruz. To the east of it are redwood forests and further east there is the Bay Area. Overall it seems to be evolving into a weekend destination for yuppies, motorcycle and bicycle riders, and "arty" people but farming is still very much a part of the economy.



The road in the picture, Stage Rd., runs north/south with the town in the distance. The photo is looking southwest.















http://maps.google.c...073814&t=h&z=14
 

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Ft. Boise and Ft. Boise Military Cemetery 1863-1912 located near Boise, Idaho.



Established in 1863 by the Union Army to help protect Oregon Trail wagon trains during the "Indian Wars". The cemetery was used to bury soldiers and soldiers families. It was also used to bury soldiers from the Civil War and WW I. The original cemetery was moved in 1906 to its present location due to flash floods in the area exposing graves.



In 1913, the U.S. Army left, and the Fort and facilities were used by various agencies over the subsequent years with some parts of the Fort still in use by those agencies. For example: Public Health Service for Veterans of WW I, Veterans Administration-operated now by the Disabled American Veterans, Elks Rehab Center, and the City of Boise which owns about 40 acres of the the fort and established a park. Ft. Boise was also called and known as Camp Boise, and Boise Barracks.



To help protect the Fort, Cemetery and surrounding land from vandalism , the city established their portion as the Military Reserve Park. After the fort was turned over, it was also occupied by the Idaho National Guard 1912-1919. The fort and surrounding foothills (which include the cemetery), were also used as a gunnery range. In 1998 during excavation, more graves were exposed at the original site and three more graves were moved to the new location with a full military ceremony. These remains are thought to be of soldiers from the Civil War. The cemetery is left to its natural vegetative state to help protect the graves from further erosion.



*Movie buffs, the final "Wild West Show" scene from Clint Eastwood's movie Bronco Billy, were filmed in a portion of the Ft. Boise Military Reserve Park.

**Ft. Boise is considered the "newer" Ft. Boise as the original Ft. Boise and second Ft. Boise were fur trading company forts established by the Hudson's Bay Company from earlier explorers use of the area near the confluence of the Boise and Snake Rivers around 1834.

 

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I haven't been able to get out to get my own photo for the contest, but Mike's shot seemed a good jumping off spot for a little creative licence. Hope that's OK Mike! One to get you started early on Halloween...



 

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A typical old New England cemetery. Off Barber Road in Exeter, RI.
 

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A bit late on this one but here it is nonetheless:



Clifton Cemetery Clifton, VA







There is not much info on the Cemetery itself. The oldest grave I could see was from 1864.

This is some info on the Town of Clifton.



The town of Clifton was formally founded in 1863 as Devereux Station, named after the railroad stop. The station played a key role in the American Civil War with Devereux Station being the southernmost point of the Union Army and a stop along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. It served as a major depot for supplies and a reloading point for trains carrying wood to the U.S. Military Railroad for burning in train engines. Soldiers frequently marched through the town, fought small battles, and set up camps beside Popes Head Creek. Union troops were housed in the town so that they could constantly be on the look out for Confederate attempts to destroy the railroad. The majority of military activity that took place along the O & A railroad during the war occurred around the area of Clifton.



Devereux Station was named after John Henry Devereux, a Union railroad superintendent from Alexandria. Following the Second Battle of Manassas, the rail lines required reconstruction. Herman Haupt, a brigadier general and civil engineer from Pennsylvania, was appointed to help reconstruct and operate the railroads in Northern Virginia. He commissioned John Henry Devereux to build the wye at Devereux Station along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. The O & A was the only railroad link between Alexandria and Richmond, Virginia.



After the Civil War ended, Devereux Station continued to grow. In 1868, a commuter station was built and the name changed to Clifton Station when Harrison G. Otis, accredited as the original founder of Clifton, bought the land. Harrison and his brother J. Sanford Otis also founded the Clifton Presbyterian Church still in existence today. The next year, Clifton became home to an official U.S. post office and Otis built the historic Clifton Hotel. The town continued to prosper, benefiting from fertile soil, widespread vineyards, and the accessible train station. The station no longer exists, but the town of Clifton is still standing along what used to be the O & A Railroad, now a part of the Norfolk Southern Railway.
 

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Day late and a dollar short. I was thinking the very same pic till I saw yours.



I will add a bit more to your narrative though. I work in the VA hospital located just over the hill from the cemetery here. This is the longest continuous running piece of federal property in the sate. Being built in 1863 the facility was turned from a cavalry fort to the VA Hospital just after WW1, Building 1 houses our HR, the old quarter master building is our ophthalmology clinic. The original barracks are the M/S ward, MRI, library, and others. The site also holds office spaces for our local IRS, FBI, ATF, and Fed court.



For history buffs, we have old pictures in the library of troops on the parade field that is still used by the ROTC elements and serves as a relaxing park for staff and patients to enjoy.



Wonderful place for this veteran to work, the feeling of the history is awesome.



Ft. Boise and Ft. Boise Military Cemetery 1863-1912 located near Boise, Idaho.



Established in 1863 by the Union Army to help protect Oregon Trail wagon trains during the "Indian Wars". The cemetery was used to bury soldiers and soldiers families. It was also used to bury soldiers from the Civil War and WW I. The original cemetery was moved in 1906 to its present location due to flash floods in the area exposing graves.



In 1913, the U.S. Army left, and the Fort and facilities were used by various agencies over the subsequent years with some parts of the Fort still in use by those agencies. For example: Public Health Service for Veterans of WW I, Veterans Administration-operated now by the Disabled American Veterans, Elks Rehab Center, and the City of Boise which owns about 40 acres of the the fort and established a park. Ft. Boise was also called and known as Camp Boise, and Boise Barracks.



To help protect the Fort, Cemetery and surrounding land from vandalism , the city established their portion as the Military Reserve Park. After the fort was turned over, it was also occupied by the Idaho National Guard 1912-1919. The fort and surrounding foothills (which include the cemetery), were also used as a gunnery range. In 1998 during excavation, more graves were exposed at the original site and three more graves were moved to the new location with a full military ceremony. These remains are thought to be of soldiers from the Civil War. The cemetery is left to its natural vegetative state to help protect the graves from further erosion.



*Movie buffs, the final "Wild West Show" scene from Clint Eastwood's movie Bronco Billy, were filmed in a portion of the Ft. Boise Military Reserve Park.

**Ft. Boise is considered the "newer" Ft. Boise as the original Ft. Boise and second Ft. Boise were fur trading company forts established by the Hudson's Bay Company from earlier explorers use of the area near the confluence of the Boise and Snake Rivers around 1834.
 

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I know I am allowed only one picture but since that one picture is on the ballot I figured it would be OK to post this picture. I just wanted to see how this would look.



 

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In search of "Lost Souls". Two graves, the final resting place for a couple of adventurous

Pioneers.



Stumbled upon this 'Cemetery' a number of years ago. Someone seems to tend to it from time-to-time. The are two very nice plaques that likely have been erected by some 4 wheel drive club as this cemetery is hard to get to. Gerry





 
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