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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so just installed a #34 pilot jet in my 16 tw 200. Reason behind it was a little run on and some lean conditions I could sense. I already opened the fuel screw from 1.5 turns out to 2.5 turns out and did see some minor improvement but not enough, so that's why the #34.

Anyways, just installed the jet and still have the carb side ways, and wondering where you guys who have installed a #34 started or not ended on the fuel screw? Did you start at 1.5, 2 or 2.5 turns out or? Hoping to save a little time since the location of the fuel screw isn't the easiest to reach without turning the carb.


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I use a hex 2" flat blade screwdriver bit... the kind you would use in a drill. No problem to reach the mixture screw. I would start at 1.5 turns out and go from there.

I need to change jets as well. I am 3 turns out using the stock pilot jet. What number is stock?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I use a hex 2" flat blade screwdriver bit... the kind you would use in a drill. No problem to reach the mixture screw. I would start at 1.5 turns out and go from there.

I need to change jets as well. I am 3 turns out using the stock pilot jet. What number is stock?
Stock is a 31 and 34 is the next one if you have a newer tw. Not sure what year the tw went to the current carb though.

I got the #34 installed and played around with the fuel screw. Started at 1.5 and went to 3 out. Not a huge difference between the turns out but I settled at 2.5 out.

I took the bike out for several rides tonight. I notice a big difference from the stock 31. It needed around 30 seconds to warm up and the throttle response was like warm. The throttle response from idle to around 20-25% improved a bit and the bike returns to idle much faster after letting off the gas. I was also able to drop the idle a tiny bit with losing any response. It was a piece of cake to change, unhook a few tubes from the carb, loosen and remove the twist throttle which allows the cables to easily come off the side of the carb, then loosen and twist the carb 90 degrees. Then loosen the four bowl screws and remove the pilot jet. Took probably 20 minutes from start to running again.

I recommend this #34 pilot, it makes the bike feel normal now.


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Nice. My 34 is at 1 1/8 turns and runs great! Couldn't get it with the stock 31.

I use a little screw driver from my late mother's sewing machine. It reaches the screw easily and and has four flats on the handle so it is easy to count turns.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice. My 34 is at 1 1/8 turns and runs great! Couldn't get it with the stock 31.

I use a little screw driver from my late mother's sewing machine. It reaches the screw easily and and has four flats on the handle so it is easy to count turns.
Did you notice much difference between 1 1/8 and 2ish with that 34? I really didn't.


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Not much. But I found that much father out and the choke wasn't needed at all during cold starts (40-50F) so that indicated to me it was a little too fat. So I went back in until I needed a little choke on cold starts for a short period of time, was able to ride off choke after a reasonably short warm up period, and lost all noticeable signs of excessive leanness upon fully warming up.

The biggest thing for me was to get rid on that periodic knock that I would get upon starting a stock hot engine. Both of mine stock when fully warm, especially in warm weather, would frequently give a "CRACK!" upon spinning the engine over. If this is typical, I am surprised that we haven't read of cases of cracked ring lands or something on completely stock engines.
 
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