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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've searched old and new and still need some help. I've got the wiring diagram.

Is there a good way to install a relay and switch to kill all the lights?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I'm not trying to run from the law on the TW!


I just want to play around on the farm without attracting attention. I want to be able to switch the lights back on if I need to run up the road.
 

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I hear ya....want to do the same thing when on our land.



Some time ago I read a how to on another forum. Which one I don't remember, but it sounded easy enough to do.



Hopefully someone smarter than us will chime in
 

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Please read the whole thing before attempting.. If you are uncertain, please ask! I don't want anyone melting thier harness!!!





Should be easy enough to do..

On a standard automotive relay you will have five terminals, labeled as follows:

85 - coil side 1

86 - coil side 2

87 - normally open

87a - normally closed

30 - common



Ok.. You must picture a relay as a remote mounted electronic switch. 30 is your common, in this case power feed to the lighting circuit would work here. You must font the wire that feeds power to the lighting and cut it. After it is cut, the end that still has power is your feed, which will go to your common, terminal 30. 87a is normally closed, meaning when the relay is in it's default state, it is connected to the common, terminal 30. You should connect the other end of the wire you just cut to 87a. Since this is normally closed, your lights should now work without any other wires connected.

Now for the coil. This is the actual "switch" portion of the relay.. It is basically a small electromagnet, and when you pass power through it, it will energize and move the internal switch. One end of the coil needs power, the other needs ground. Unlike the "load" portion of the relay, these are very low current, so you can use very small wires and a very light duty switch. The polarity of the coil does not matter, either side can be positive as long as the opposite side is ground. I like to make my switch ground triggered so there is no live power on my wires. To do this you need to connect one coil terminal to power. I would take 85 and connect it with 30, since in this situation 30 will have power when the bike is on. After that you will connect one end of your switch to ground, the other to terminal 86. The best way is some small black speaker wire. At one end connect the switch, at the other end you will ground one side and connect the other to your relay, this way you only have to run "one" wire to the switch since speaker cable has two conductors in there, and you can safely ground it inside somewhere near your relay.
 

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One thing I left out.. Terminal 87, normally open..

This terminal will "go live", as in connect to the feed from terminal 30, when the switch is active.



When I was in the marines we used map lights at night that were red. Red light minimally effects your nightvision and cannot be seen from as far of a distance, especially by wildlife.. It would be kind of cool to find a fairly bright red light (maybe a taillight or brake light?) to mount to the front and power off terminal 87.. Then when you hit the switch your main lights will shut off and your red "nitelite" will come on at the same time. :)



This walk through can be used as a "map" to make a relay do just about anything!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was really looking for a more wire color specific answer.


I've studied the diagram and was hoping to find the "ahah that's the spot" location for a switch. Unfortunately, I don't think there is ONE location to switch for a "blackout switch".

I first looked at the hot wires since I was hoping to use an illuminated switch. A visual check of the switch LED confirms that lights are on, an idiot light of sorts so I know my light is on for the highway. If I remember correctly, it would require at least three switches in order to go this route. I didn't want to tamper with the CDI wiring since I don't understand what's going on there.


On my 96', I want to turn off the Tail/brake light, Headlight, and the front "marker/signal" lights. The rear markers only work as a signal, there not on all the time anyway. I don't need to turn off the instrument lights but I will if someone has an better plan.

I then started looking at the grounds for a switch location. I planned to connect the tail/brake ground, the headlight ground, and the front marker ground to one side of a SPST switch and make a new ground point on the frame for the other side of the switch. I tested it out and found that the front markers stayed ON. They were completing the circuit on the BLUE wire (which the rear markers don't have). So, to turn all the lights off with a single switch, I used a DPST switch. On one pole I have the ground circuit and the other I have the blue wire from the front markers. I also added a small LED "idiot light" beside the switch by connecting it's power supply to the load end of the blue wire and just grounded the other.

I agree that relays are sometimes very useful. I added several to an MGB car in order to brighten the lights and take a load off of the old switches. I've heard that the aviation industry avoids relays because they are still basically a switch and that just doubles the chances of a potential failure. They opt to use a quality switch and skip the relay.



I'm sure there may be a better way to wire a "blackout switch" but I couldn't figure it out. My way is working for now. If anyone sees a problem with my setup, PLEASE let me know. I'm open to ideas. I don't want to end up with a sneak current or a parasitic draw or worse.

Check out my edited post below!
 

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Have to check on the wire color, but you only need one switch, just wire it to the trigger on three relays. This will keep the circuits isolated while allowing you to kill all three at once.
 

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Have to check on the wire color, but you only need one switch, just wire it to the trigger on three relays. This will keep the circuits isolated while allowing you to kill all three at once.


14 pin 4 pole relay is about $6 online. One switch to control up to 4 separate circuits. Now to identify the wires to run through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well. I can't figure out why but my lights continue to burn very dim even with the ground cut very close to the bulbs. So, I've dug into (unwrapped) the harness looking for other solutions and checking out the hot side of the circuits. Here's what I found.

R/W wire feeds power to the main switch. When the key is on power is tranfered to the brown wire which supplies power to ALL lights AND the ignition and starter circuit relays. I traced the brown from the main switch back to the first splice (under fuel tank) and cut it free. Then find the brown wire coming from both relays (just ahead of the rear brake switch wires) and cut them free. Then connect the brown wires you've cut free so the relays get power when the key is turned on.

Now all you have to do is supply a new power feed to the light circuits. I used a relay and switch as well as a led indicator light so I know the lights are on in daylight.

 

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