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Discussion Starter #1
About to embark on replacing my rear bearings and wondering if folks have tips or cautions about how to go about it?

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Here is the first vid that popped up. It's not a TW. The TW is different but these tips will help.

 

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It is a pretty simple task. It took about fifteen minutes after the wheel was off. These were 12 years old and came out without a lot of beating.
Plan ahead and have a good sized hammer and something long to beat on. Dont be tempted to use your rear axle. The ones on the sprocket side seem to sustain the most wear. There was about a quarter inch of play in the bearings and they were still fairly functional surprisingly.

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Use a sharp drift and tap evenly on the inner race of the damaged bearing until it comes out, don't let it bind.
 

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Now having done it I hve a much better method thought out which would make short work of it. Now I just need another worn out bearing to try it on

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The "trick" for stubborn bearings, or bikes where the axle spacer doesn't move much so you can't get a solid hit with a drift, is to get a concrete wedge anchor suitably sized for the ID of the bearing. Couple bucks at any hardware or big box store. Tap it in so the wedge/clip is just inside the ID, flip the wheel around, use something to tap against the bottom of the wedge gently a few times so the clip expands and "bites", then give it a few solid whacks. The bearing will fly out of there with the anchor still in the middle since now you've got a perfect flat surface to hammer on. Just tap it off in the other direction, squeeze the clip down again with pliers, and you can re-use it pretty much indefinitely.

Also, buy bearings online. They're parts bin items, there's nothing special about the ones in your wheels. There should be a code on the seal or one of the races you can match up, if not just measure the ID, OD, and thickness in millimeters. Same goes for the dust deals. Stick to name brands (SFK, Nachi, ect) from reputable sellers. If it's a 99 cent "SKF", it's fake. Honda wanted $30 for a wheel bearing for my Valkyrie, a local bearing supplier wanted $25, Napa wanted as much as Honda, I bought a SKF online for $7. When you're doing four that's a tidy savings. NAPA does sell bearings, but they're pretty much as expensive as dealers. They often offer two versions, an economy and premium. SKF is their supplier for the "premium" ones. The economy are no-name generics.

I've used the All Balls kits in the past and don't have any problems to report, but they are generic/Chinese bearings and I've only used them for smaller/cheaper bikes that I didn't keep terribly long. Considering they are full of essentially 99 cent bearings, paying $30 for two and two seals seems like kind of a rip off honestly, paying for the convenience.
 

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The local Yamaha shop wanted close to 90 dollars fpr the bearings and seals and didn't even have them in stock. They have literally never had a single item ive called about in stock. Ended up ordering from eBay

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