TW200 Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The inside of the brake is smooth and glazed. I tried using a soft grey scotchbright pad and brake cleaner.

It cleaned up real nice, but its still as smooth as a baby's butt.

What should I use to prep the surface before installation?

If emory cloth is used, what grade?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
<snip>but its still as smooth as a baby's butt.

What should I use to prep the surface before installation?


I only have experience from drums on cars... But, I'm pretty sure it's supposed to be smooth. Even if it isn't, it will be after a few miles riding. It's the opposing pressure of the shoes against the drum that does the stopping... "smooth" doesn't make much difference as long as the drum and shoes are relatively clean. I just deglaze them every few weeks by doing one long stop with the rear brake, getting as close to "locking up" as I can without actually locking. I do the same to my Jeep E-brake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
glazing really isnt a good thing. i believe (someone correct me if i'm wrong) that doing those long stops and coming close to locking up the tire is actually just adding to the glazing problem. if i were you i'd see if the drum would mount up on a standard brake lathe and turn it. i believe it probably would, and you get get a shop to turn it for probably 8-10 bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
glazing really isnt a good thing. i believe (someone correct me if i'm wrong) that doing those long stops and coming close to locking up the tire is actually just adding to the glazing problem. if i were you i'd see if the drum would mount up on a standard brake lathe and turn it. i believe it probably would, and you get get a shop to turn it for probably 8-10 bucks.
Agreed, turning the drum would be best. But, a lot of shops won't touch a drum as small as the TW's. Doing the long stop trick is a hack... it's good for a drum that's been cleaned and scuffed, but I didn't mean to imply it was something that should be done regularly. I generally do this only after I've had brakes apart, cleaned and/or replaced pads/shoes. I've found it help to get everything seated in and to burn off whatever you might have missed. Where you ride also makes a big difference... Florida sugar sand and/or Georgia clay can really glaze stuff up. Occasionally burning it off has made a big difference to the stopping power on my Jeeps, I'd assume the same would apply to the TW drum. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
ah ha, just as a totally offtopic sidenote, i also have a jeep (97 wrangler, built the motor myself). goes to show that great minds think alike... tdubs and jeeps.
The TeeDub is almost a Jeep.
I had both of them out at Moab this year and loved them both.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top