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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm new to the TW200 and the forum, but this past weekend has given me an experience that compels me to stop guest lurking and put up a post.



This last weekend I took out the bike to make sure it was running right after doing some work on the carburetor, drove it along the rail service/ranch access road next to where I live. Imagine my surprise when the rear end collapsed and the bike immediately stopped/stalled after going over a couple bumps! Closer inspection revealed that the lower mount of the rear shock had snapped and the shock had been jostled so nothing was supporting the rear end. At this point the underside of the seat was resting directly on the tire. Luckily I had slowed down in anticipation of the rough terrain and wasn't going very fast. I lifted the seat and was able to position the shock so the bottom of the shock was resting between its mount and the bracing that is just in front of it so I could ride it (very slowly) back home; I suspect the mount had broken sometime back and the shock had actually been resting there for awhile before this incident, based on how some of the metal is worn.



I did some web searching and found this thread in the old forum: Yamaha Recalls TW200



I have a 1999 TW200 that I bought earlier this year (used, obviously). I've put a few hundred miles on it bringing the odometer to 3900 miles. I'm not sure what kinds of experience others have had with their TWs with this model shock, but there does seem to be a potential for a very dangerous and possibly deadly failure of the rear shock mount depending on the riding circumstances.



Does anyone know if Yamaha USA has instituted a recall for the shock yet? If they haven't addressed this issue as it has been elsewhere in the world, it seems as if they are just asking for a lawsuit.





***If you have a pre-2002? (I'm not entirely sure of the year) TW200 I highly recommend that you check the mount on your shock to make sure it is still attached. If your suspension fails, it isn't going to be pleasant!
 

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Yamaha Canada Inc treats this as a recall, and replaces the shock, even though mine looked perfect. My only complaint with the process, was that I had to fax a copy of my title to Yamaha Canada Inc. to let them update my ownership information. Honda Canada Inc. would just let you update owner information over the phone.
 

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As of about 4 months ago no recall for US bikes. I brought mine in to the dealer when I heard about it and they looked at me like I was stupid then finally after some digging realized it was true but a no go for the US. Nothing will happen until people in the US start wrecking from it and threaten to sue Yamaha for it. You would think they would just deal with it now rather than risk someone really getting hurt and suing for millions but i guess I'm no businessman....
 

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Yamaha Canada Inc treats this as a recall, and replaces the shock, even though mine looked perfect. My only complaint with the process, was that I had to fax a copy of my title to Yamaha Canada Inc. to let them update my ownership information. Honda Canada Inc. would just let you update owner information over the phone.


Didn't even have to do that. Gave my VIN number to the dealer, they said "We'll order it in, no problem".
 

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And This From Australia

Yamaha—Models TW200 1987-2000 Motorcycle—Rear Shock Assy

PRA number: 2009/10599

Date created: 13th February 2009

Product information

Product description

What are the hazards?

Injury.

What are the defects?

The welded portion of the lower rear shock mount may crack from vibration and impacts generated from bumps while riding.

Where the product was sold

Nationally

Supplier

Yamaha Motor Australia Pty Ltd

What should consumers do?
 

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Appears Yamaha U.S. does not care about U.S. customers so my plans to go look at either a FJR or the new Super Tenere will be scrapped for sure. Don't have the money to spend anyways!



So, anyone try just welding the weak area to build it up for strength? Would this be possible? Anyone just buy a new shock? Is a new shock the "stronger" version?



I'm not giving up my TW but don't want to snap my back either out on the trail. It took a few families getting burned to a crisp to get Ford to admit the Pinto was a rolling gasbomb! If Yamaha wants to play the same "hide the ball on safety issues" game to save money then I will move on. Maybe since it has not broken in 24 years it won't?



My current plan is to remove the shock and weld the connection point to build it up for strength. Any thoughs or comments on my plan to do this would be appreciated.
 

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They say welding it is not feasible because the heat would damage the rest of the shock. Maybe if you disassembled the shock and went really slow you could weld it.
 

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Appears Yamaha U.S. does not care about U.S. customers so my plans to go look at either a FJR or the new Super Tenere will be scrapped for sure. Don't have the money to spend anyways!



So, anyone try just welding the weak area to build it up for strength? Would this be possible? Anyone just buy a new shock? Is a new shock the "stronger" version?



I'm not giving up my TW but don't want to snap my back either out on the trail. It took a few families getting burned to a crisp to get Ford to admit the Pinto was a rolling gasbomb! If Yamaha wants to play the same "hide the ball on safety issues" game to save money then I will move on. Maybe since it has not broken in 24 years it won't?



My current plan is to remove the shock and weld the connection point to build it up for strength. Any thoughs or comments on my plan to do this would be appreciated.
Yamaha in Canada and Australia would do the same as the U.S. It's just that Those governments are a little more concerned with their citizens and a little less friendly to the corporate masters.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I must confess that I was somewhat impatient to get my bike back together. I don't recommend for anyone else trying this since there is a risk that the shock absorber will overheat and catastrophically explode... that being said, I did weld mine back together. I stuck the shock in a bucket of water (again, potential risks here, in this case from electrocution while using an electric welder) and only welded in short segments and cooled it immediately between welds. I put a lot of extra metal around the joint to spread out the stresses and I'll keep an eye on it for cracks and the like, but it's holding together quite well so far.



Still, I'm very surprised that Yamaha hasn't conducted a recall in the US considering the propensity for lawsuits in this country. Perhaps a class action lawsuit is in order, not that I'm volunteering my time to get that started...
 

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Thanks to all on this topic. I suspected the simple fix of welding it to make it stronger was too simple and easy to work.
 
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