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Discussion Starter #1
Well its time for a rear tire change. so~~ITS BIG.!!! Is there anything weird , tough , or otherwise something to be alerted to? I know how to do MC tires .... Will the TW need monster tire irons ??? Am I just being in "awe" again??? If I took it to my car tire guy , can he change it and I watch and pay??? :) I apologize if this has been discussed in a previous thread.... I looked and didn't find .. thanks , Eric
 

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A bike shop can usually do it for you cheap. You can do it yourself with irons, though. A big one to work it, and two separate smaller ones to hold it in place. Use your hand to hold one small one and a knee to hold another. Sometimes getting the wheel back on is a little tough with the spacer trying to fall off, but it just needs to be lined up just so and it'll slide right back in the swingarm.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A bike shop can usually do it for you cheap. You can do it yourself with irons, though. A big one to work it, and two separate smaller ones to hold it in place. Use your hand to hold one small one and a knee to hold another. Sometimes getting the wheel back on is a little tough with the spacer trying to fall off, but it just needs to be lined up just so and it'll slide right back in the swingarm.
Thanks ~ I will proceed forward and be careful of my knuckles...
 

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Mine was TOUGH! I ended up using a 2x4 wedge, a six foot piece of 2x4 and the hitch on my pickup. Its "easy" if you have enough leverage.
 

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I did the rear tire for the first time last Saturday..

Breaking the bead was a bitch.

Spooning it off and on seem to take forever and was messy.

I used a hand pump to fill it -- they hold a lot of air!

The spacer on the left and the brake backing plate on the right wouldn't stay put.

Would I do it again? YES! Next time I bet I can do it in half the time -- 1.5 to 2 hours.
 

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I took my bike to a local one man M/C shop. He mounted and balanced a front tire that I supplied for $30.

While I shot the breeze with some other bikers.
 

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i would say watch a few youtube videos first...like Rainman said you can build a bead breaker with wood...i have seen people use large zip ties to mount/dismount tires too but i think that would be hard with tubed tires...tubed tires should fit a little looser on the rims than tubeless tires do so that should make it a little easier...i dismounted my front tire on my motard and got it half mounted and then took it to a shop and had them finish it and dismount and mount my rear as well as balance and clean both wheels for $60 cause it was a pain since motard tires are tubeless but the wheels are tubed...when i have to swap out my TW tires i will attempt it again



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qw0B2gIwbBg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTatadVNA-c
 

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Tires are like carbs, not rocket science, but knowing a few secrets helps.



1) Your tools are too small. Get a couple 15-16 inch tools.

2) Bend and notch an 8 or 9 inch tool to hang on to a spoke.

3) Cut up empty opil bottles for rim protectors.

4) Use a good lube, such as 50/50 dish soap and water, and make sure not to miss any spots.

5) Letting the air out of a tube will not allow enough deflation for tire changing. Remove the valve core.

6) Use a valve stem puller.

7) When spooning a bead, make sure the bead on the opposite side of the wheel is over the spoke nipples, not over the bead of the rim.

8) After popping the bead, repeatedly inflate and allow to deflate (no valve core) the tube to allow tube to untwist and settle evenly in the tire and rim. It is amazing how often a wobbly, out-of-round tire is due to a twisted, lopsided tube install.

9) After the beads pop, make sure the indicator line is even all around the rim.

10) After mounting and inflating, mark the heavy spot and valve location on the tire. Deflate, loosen the beads, and rotate the tire to reduce or eliminate the need for weights. You may need to do this several times to get it just right. Be sure to inflate and deflate the tube several times so it is well settled. Then install the valve core.

11) DO NOT tighten the nut on the valve core. If pressure is low for some reason, and the tire slips on the rim, an unbolted valve will tilt, which is a warning that something isn't right. A bolted valve will be ripped from the tube. Instead, keep the valve stem nut in your tool box to use for repairs when necessary.

12) Use Ride-On. I've used a half dozen other tire sealers over the years, and Ride-On is the only one that has never left me with a flat. I've pulled plenty of hardware, spines and thorns: Pfffft, silence. RideOn contributes to balance, and somehow prevents heat buildup in the tread, resulting in longer tire life, enough to cover the cost of the Ride-On. The stuff is also water soluble, so tubes are patchable with little other then a wipe with a wet cloth. Don't bother trying to patch or plug any other sealer.
 

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Tires are like carbs, not rocket science, but knowing a few secrets helps.



1) Your tools are too small. Get a couple 15-16 inch tools.

2) Bend and notch an 8 or 9 inch tool to hang on to a spoke.

3) Cut up empty opil bottles for rim protectors.

4) Use a good lube, such as 50/50 dish soap and water, and make sure not to miss any spots.

5) Letting the air out of a tube will not allow enough deflation for tire changing. Remove the valve core.

6) Use a valve stem puller.

7) When spooning a bead, make sure the bead on the opposite side of the wheel is over the spoke nipples, not over the bead of the rim.

8) After popping the bead, repeatedly inflate and allow to deflate (no valve core) the tube to allow tube to untwist and settle evenly in the tire and rim. It is amazing how often a wobbly, out-of-round tire is due to a twisted, lopsided tube install.

9) After the beads pop, make sure the indicator line is even all around the rim.

10) After mounting and inflating, mark the heavy spot and valve location on the tire. Deflate, loosen the beads, and rotate the tire to reduce or eliminate the need for weights. You may need to do this several times to get it just right. Be sure to inflate and deflate the tube several times so it is well settled. Then install the valve core.

11) DO NOT tighten the nut on the valve core. If pressure is low for some reason, and the tire slips on the rim, an unbolted valve will tilt, which is a warning that something isn't right. A bolted valve will be ripped from the tube. Instead, keep the valve stem nut in your tool box to use for repairs when necessary.

12) Use Ride-On. I've used a half dozen other tire sealers over the years, and Ride-On is the only one that has never left me with a flat. I've pulled plenty of hardware, spines and thorns: Pfffft, silence. RideOn contributes to balance, and somehow prevents heat buildup in the tread, resulting in longer tire life, enough to cover the cost of the Ride-On. The stuff is also water soluble, so tubes are patchable with little other then a wipe with a wet cloth. Don't bother trying to patch or plug any other sealer.


Yep! Did all those thing except I put baby powder on the tube and inside the tire. Ride On will come later. The rear tire/wheel was still a bitch! I also duct taped the nipples.



Do you leave the inside nut on the valve stem in place? This time I only used the washer that came with the tube. Seems from what I have read about half the people do and half don't and either way it works out OK.



 

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Discussion Starter #15
Many thanks to all that have responded to my rear tire mounting query... Great info from all.!!!... The tire is on !!! The TW handles like a different bike. 7000 miles on a 2005 tire.Too long. Hard side walls and used up center tread... New is a BIG improvment.So I took all info ...weighed the plus and minus's... and bit the bullet... I dove right in ................and drove it to~~~ well , best $ 7 dollars I spent in a long time.....Thanks again.......
 

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Discussion Starter #17
[quote name='Tony' date='31 July 2012 - 07:22 PM' timestamp='1343791356' post='51706']

Seven bucks?!?!?!? Around here they charge $23!



I went to the car tire guy.....just tipped the worker......he was happy ... I am thrilled!!!
 

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I just ounted TW203 and TW204 by hand. The rear was a bitch to break from the bead, but otherwise they weren't bad.

Used the 2x4 and trailer hitch method to break the rear tire, the front I was able to simply step on.

Used plenty of dish soap/water mixture both when dismounting and mounting.



I removed the existing wheel weights.

Now whether to balance???
 

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Tires are like carbs, not rocket science, but knowing a few secrets helps.



1) Your tools are too small. Get a couple 15-16 inch tools.

2) Bend and notch an 8 or 9 inch tool to hang on to a spoke.

3) Cut up empty opil bottles for rim protectors.

4) Use a good lube, such as 50/50 dish soap and water, and make sure not to miss any spots.

5) Letting the air out of a tube will not allow enough deflation for tire changing. Remove the valve core.

6) Use a valve stem puller.

7) When spooning a bead, make sure the bead on the opposite side of the wheel is over the spoke nipples, not over the bead of the rim.

8) After popping the bead, repeatedly inflate and allow to deflate (no valve core) the tube to allow tube to untwist and settle evenly in the tire and rim. It is amazing how often a wobbly, out-of-round tire is due to a twisted, lopsided tube install.

9) After the beads pop, make sure the indicator line is even all around the rim.

10) After mounting and inflating, mark the heavy spot and valve location on the tire. Deflate, loosen the beads, and rotate the tire to reduce or eliminate the need for weights. You may need to do this several times to get it just right. Be sure to inflate and deflate the tube several times so it is well settled. Then install the valve core.

11) DO NOT tighten the nut on the valve core. If pressure is low for some reason, and the tire slips on the rim, an unbolted valve will tilt, which is a warning that something isn't right. A bolted valve will be ripped from the tube. Instead, keep the valve stem nut in your tool box to use for repairs when necessary.

12) Use Ride-On. I've used a half dozen other tire sealers over the years, and Ride-On is the only one that has never left me with a flat. I've pulled plenty of hardware, spines and thorns: Pfffft, silence. RideOn contributes to balance, and somehow prevents heat buildup in the tread, resulting in longer tire life, enough to cover the cost of the Ride-On. The stuff is also water soluble, so tubes are patchable with little other then a wipe with a wet cloth. Don't bother trying to patch or plug any other sealer.


I just received a Harbor Freight Flier in the mail and they have a 24" tire iron for $4.99. I have a pair but have not needed to use them yet.



Happy Trails All



Ron in Boise
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I just received a Harbor Freight Flier in the mail and they have a 24" tire iron for $4.99. I have a pair but have not needed to use them yet.



Happy Trails All



Ron in Boise




Cool ~~ Ill get some just to put the fear in me ... that I might hsave to use them...
 
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