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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Going to be replacing my rear tire as soon as it arrives and I have one question. After I replace the tire what about balancing the tire. Is that a concern, do I need to worry about that? If yes, how do I go about balancing it.? Thanks for the help.

UPDATE
The tire is mounted!!! I have a local indie shop that I never used before, read bad reviews, but I stopped in and talked to the guy. I don't know why all the bad reviews. He said $25 to mount/balance the new tire. $25? That couldn't be. So I pulled the rear wheel and took it into him and he did the job in the 3-hour window i asked for. I was impressed, I bought his lunch that day.
The only down side is I'm no longer flat-footed at a stop light, that's how worn my tire was.
 

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You may not need to balance it at all, assuming you're doing the work at home and not at a motorcycle shop. I replaced my rear tire at home this past summer and it did not need to balanced. Nor was there any balance weights when the stock tire was on.

If it does need to be balanced, you'll have to weigh the cost of buying the equipment and products as mentioned above, versus taking the tire to a m/c shop and having them balance it for you. Both products listed above are good alternatives for the DIY mechanic. I like the Ride On, as it suppose to balance the tire and help prevent flats. Good luck.
 

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Just put the axle through the hub and support the ends on blocks or something--accurate enough for our purposes. Mark the low spot on the rim and tire. Deflate the tire and slide the tire around the rim. With a few patient tries I can usually balance a motorcycle tire without weights, or at least reduce the weight needed. There are weights available with a slot in them that slide over the spoke, and centrifugal force holds them tight when you push them down on the nipple. Simple and effective.

Ride-On is in every tire I own. It is that good.
 

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I used ride-on as well.

I notice the front smoothed right out and the bars don't shake!

Havent had had a flat yet either.
 

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+1 on H.F. balancer. I have some football shaped lead weights that I've drilled larger to the spoke width (can't remember size). Then I did a hot dog bun cut length wise with a hack saw. Stick a dab of silicone on the spoke, vise grip the weight on, and you're good to go. Hardest part is finding lead weights here in Kalifornia.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks guys to for the info and good to see some out-time posters responding, qwerty ,tirebiter, diver.

One more thing. A group of 3 spokes have cone shaped weights, I'm guessing they're weights, attached to them, do I leave them on, remove? If I should remove them how do they come off?
Thanks again.
 

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When you replace your tire be sure to remove the three OEM weights and start from scratch. You can hacksaw and pry them off.
 

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.... do I leave them on, remove? If I should remove them how do they come off?
They can be removed and re-used with the new tire when balanced, I believe. You need two large blade screwdrivers to open up the slit until they pop off. If you are going to use Ride-On, I would leave them off and try it for a few rides before deciding if you need to balance the new tire.
 

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Those are the spoke-mounted weights to which I was referring. Gently pry them off the nipples and up the spokes with a screwdriver, then stick a screwdriver in each end of the slot to open them. Once removed, put a little effort into getting the wheel/tire combo as balanced as possible by sliding the tire around the rim. Be sure to remove the valve core and fully inflate the tube until the beads pop, than let the tube fully deflate so it finds its natural position inside the tire. Repeat 3 or 4 times before reinstalling the core and airing the tire for good. Sliding the tire around on the rim can pull and stretch the tube in odd ways and repeatedly inflating and deflating the tube makes sure it isn't folded or twisted.

Football sinkers are easily modified for wheel weights, as BillMichaels explained, if you can't find real motorcycle weights.

Ride-On in a new tire will let the tire run so much cooler its tread will last 1.5 to 2 times as long. Therefore, Ride-On repays handsomely over the long term. Just be sure to look at the tires every time you walk up to make sure there is nothing stuck in them. Leaving an object in the tire for a long time can wallow the hole so big the sealant can't seal. This would be your fault for neglecting the tire when the problem would never had occurred if you had pulled the object out earlier. I can't count the times I've walked up to a vehicle, whipped out the multi-tool, plucked out the offending item, heard a PFFFFT, and driven on. I have a trailer tire still used regularly that was first punctured 8 years ago.
 

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I will be putting new tires on both of my TDubs this spring, front and rear. How much of the Ride On will I need for four tires?

Has anyone been shopping for tires lately? I am pretty happy with the stock rear tire that says Trail Wing 32 Bridgestone. The front is also trail wing #31 but I think most here like the Shinko for the fronts. I am open to suggestions. What vendor has the best prices these days for tires and tubes?

GaryL
 

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I will be putting new tires on both of my TDubs this spring, front and rear. How much of the Ride On will I need for four tires?
GaryL
http://www.ride-on.com/images/stories/pdf/motorcycle-dosage-april-2012.pdf

or Calculator - Ride-On

I put in 12 front, 18 rear for tubed tires, or 30 oz. I had some left over, so you could shave a little and get 7 bottles for two bikes. That would be 11 front, 17 rear. It takes some patience to get ALL the goo out of each bottle....you can cut them open, scrape the residue into the last bottle and get a couple of extra oz. It also takes a bit of patience just to get the required amount in each tire!

EDIT!! I screwed up here. You need 10 in front, 13 in the rear, or three bottles per bike. Must have not set up the calculator correctly....:icon_colors:

Not cheap, but what is it worth to you to spoon that monster rear off the bike and try to repair the tube in the middle of nowhere alone? For me that would be about $500!:eek:;) (or $5,000, depending on where the middle of nowhere was :D)

I got mine from: Ride-On Motorcycle Tire Balancer & Sealant | Dirt Bike | Rocky Mountain ATV/MC
 

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SHINKO 244 5.10-18 M/C 69P, FRONT/REAR
BRIDGESTONE TW34 180/80-14 M/C 78P, REAR
Price includes ground shipping. This is an excellent combination and the combo I use for dualsport rides with a lot of pavement. The Shinko is actually rated as a front tire in 5.10-18. The Kenda and IRC are not. State troopers around here will ticket for running a tire labeled rear only on the front.

The Shinko will match the Bridgestone's performance in the soft stuff, beat it with a stick on hardpack and pavement, and last twice as long without the vibration going nuts as miles accumulate.
 

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SHINKO 244 5.10-18 M/C 69P, FRONT/REAR
BRIDGESTONE TW34 180/80-14 M/C 78P, REAR
Price includes ground shipping. This is an excellent combination and the combo I use for dualsport rides with a lot of pavement. The Shinko is actually rated as a front tire in 5.10-18. The Kenda and IRC are not. State troopers around here will ticket for running a tire labeled rear only on the front.

The Shinko will match the Bridgestone's performance in the soft stuff, beat it with a stick on hardpack and pavement, and last twice as long without the vibration going nuts as miles accumulate.
Thanks QWERTY, I can't wait until momma sees this bill!:eek:

GaryL
 
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