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Discussion Starter #1
New TW rider. I want to go exploring in the woods here, and am wondering what you solo riders pack for being safe in the woods... I ran a BW200 for years but always with a friend who has other interests now. (new bride) I always packed spare batteries for my backwoods GPS, a few waters, fishing rod and gear, cell phone.
I am thinking of picking up a life straw, kick starter assy to install, a box of snack bars, Jerry can with 1-3 gallons of fuel, a booster pack for recharging, a small 12v compressor,
What do you pack when riding solo? Appreciate the input.
Ron
 

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The tools and know how to actually fix a flat on the trail. It's harder than most realize, and the weakest link for sure. The TW is generally very reliable, a Kickstarter and a way to fix a flat and your odds go way up.
 

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A tracking device such as a Spot or one of the other devices that will allow somone to pinpoint your location should you drop off the radar.

SPOT. This would be my #1 item had I known better back a few years. Have one now and don't leave without it, even when I don't ride into a bush!:p

Tire spoons and patches. You already mentioned air compressor. I use a hand pump so I don't have to rely on electrocution. I rode for years without getting a flat. Within the last year...twice.

Life straw. Another excellent item. I ran out of water on the same trip as I needed the SPOT and didn't have one. I've not used it yet after carrying it for a few years but always have it.

Tools. Carry a 1/4 inch socket wrench with an 8mm socket, 10mm socket and 12 mm socket. Takes up very little room and you will need the 8mm socket if you have to remove the side covers. Think rock poked hole in side cover and you can temporarily patch the hole with steel stick but you have to remove some of the material the rock just bashed in towards the engine. Happened in real life where the repair could be made with steel stick but the side cover material pushed into the clutch basket. You get the idea I hope.

So, with that, carry steel stick. I think JB weld makes it. Can come in different flavors (types). Again, doesn't take up much room in a bag.

You may want to install the kick starter before you leave that way you don't have to carry it along with you taking up valuable space. haha, I know what you meant and just trying to be Mr. Funny man. Kick starter is excellent to have if the battery goes kaput. Yep, had that happen too. If not a kick starter, get one of those pocket sized power starters you can hookup to a battery and jump start it. Saw ejfranz use it to help someone start their bike. Again, doesn't take up much room.

I also like to carry my "Crescent-hammer". It's a ball peen hammer head welded onto the end of a crescent wrench. I used an 8" crescent wrench.

I also carry a tow rope.

All this fits into a small bag I carry on the back. You can see the size of the bag on the back of my XT200 in this picture. Not too big.

I also got the idea from Mountain Yawp to use a Fanny Pack and strap it around the gas tank to carry some extra things. Could be your tools but in my case it's snacks and extra water bottles. I've also used a horse saddle horn bag but they also make about the same thing for ATV's called a tank bag. Does the same thing as the fanny pack.

An extra chain master-link is a good idea I've been told. I carry one but never used it. Some place this on a key-ring for the key.

And one last thing you may want to consider depending on where you live. I'll let you think about this one based on your own wants, needs, and personal values. I'll put it this way. Last week I saw a fresh pile of bear poop in the middle of the trail. I wouldn't want to break down in the area and have to walk out.
 

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SPOT. This would be my #1 item had I known better back a few years. Have one now and don't leave without it, even when I don't ride into a bush!:p
Wait till you see the new one they just put out, on back order, will have one soon! :)
You can text cell phones from it through satellite (and they you), so they say ;)
 

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Wait till you see the new one they just put out, on back order, will have one soon! :)
You can text cell phones from it through satellite (and they you), so they say ;)
Someday we won't be able to use the excuse..."I was lost". It's so fun telling my overnight ride adventure story to those who I think I haven't told it to before.:p
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the ideas and product suggestions. Please keep them coming.
As far as animal control issues are concerned, (bear in particular) Ive seen lots of fresh bear poop on the logging roads, and felt safe being able to hide in my service truck, if the need arose. What are you packing for personal protection? Remember that I am in Canada, and rules for what may be carried may be different up hear than for our American cousins...
I like the crescent wrench hammer (Frankenwrench) idea. I have a bunch of old adjustable wrenches and ball peens around. A small hatchet if your camping I imagine, and could be used for hand to hand combat with a bear in extreme situations.. :>
I see a similar product to the Spot called Inreach by garmin, with mapping on it. I will look at these. I understand subscriptions vary.
How big of a cargo box are you packing this in? Im eyeing the 8 gallon one but would like to be able to affix a jerry can behind it off my rack. I'm starting a rack build today and will try to incorporate that.
 

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I don't have a kickstarter, but carry the an emergency Jump starter - see https://www.tw200forum.com/forum/general-discussion/51929-jump-starters.html#post765521 for more info.
I have not used it on my bike , but used it on "Smoke rudder's" (AKA side kick Chad) XT225 this last weekend to start it.
You should also check out if the TW members in your area would like to go for a ride. I can think of John AKA Elvesus as he is in Nanaimo.
I carry a SPOT, portable air compressor, Flat tire kit and have slim or ride on in the tube.
I also carry a home made survival kit that has: Knife, fire starter, fishing gear, solar blanket, etc in it if I need to spend the night - I need to add my life straw to it. You could carry bear spray, but I have never had any issues with black bears. A DualSportBC member I know had to use his bear spray on a grizzly he came across on an interior road. His advise is to have it in an easy access spot on your bike. Not in an enclosed pack.
 

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The jerry can and 3 gallons of fuel makes me think Ron is planning to venture farther afield than most of us since that equates to over 300 odd miles of range, more than one typically can do on secondary roads in one day. So where is the matching camping gear to spend the nights required to burn all that gas? Maybe a smaller fuel container might be more appropriate.
With all the bulk and weight of all the listed gear the bike is going to be much more dangerous to ride than a lightly loaded bike so I would add first aid gear too for the inevitable tip overs that pile of gear will likely induce.
Balance the gear with the intended duration and difficulty of anticipated ride. Some expedition folks advise to lay all the intended gear out, then leave half of it behind.
Any cargo box behind the rider will get in the way of a clean ejection sequence to the rear should need arise. Sometimes brush and tight quarters require rider to slip off bike quickly. If tipped over while on bike that box can make it dangerously difficult to get out from under the bike. Plan and ride accordingly.
A couple cans of bear spray, one to use and one to loose, should deter most bruins without fear of legal ramifications from shooting one.
 

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Great thread!

Many good ideas, thanks to all.

A jump-start, portable battery is a good thing to have; got one myself. But, it wont help like a kickstarter will if the starter motor or wiring goes south!
 

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Opinions vary but I feel a high CFM air pump set up to quickly re-fill and then quickly ride a leaking tire coupled with RideOn are better options than running the risk of an unsuccessful trailside tire disassembly and tube repair by oneself.
If one has faith in the spoons and patch kit then by all means prove that faith at home first by a test repair using only assets you plan to have with you in the dirt, no smooth surface, no blocks to support bike, no going into garage for one more tool or tire lubricant. Breaking the bead on the rear tire may not be feasible despite desperation and necessity.
I always plan to walk out if necessary, and have had to do just that a few times for a seised piston and a holed crankcase ( the oil in a 2-stroke fuel mix prevents it from being used to clean off surface prior to epoxy fixes). That means absolutely no MX boots unless you pack alternate walking shoes or go barefoot. Plus a way to carry needed gear during the walk out.
 

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The riding I have done on the Island is similar to around here - steep. You should be able to bump start the bike.
A pruning saw is also a good idea - trails can become a mess after a wind storm. I try to carry my Stihl PS 90 Arboriculture Saw. This saw will attach to the front fork.
A recent ride in Naramata, BC required us to cut our way out of the bush or turn around, which we did not want to do. I had left my saw in the truck, but luckily my friend was carrying his.
 

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The riding I have done on the Island is similar to around here - steep. You should be able to bump start the bike.
A pruning saw is also a good idea - trails can become a mess after a wind storm. I try to carry my Stihl PS 90 Arboriculture Saw. This saw will attach to the front fork.
A recent ride in Naramata, BC required us to cut our way out of the bush or turn around, which we did not want to do. I had left my saw in the truck, but luckily my friend was carrying his.
A saw saved our asses in Green Ridge. I had to saw through a fallen oak tree to get through a main gravel road after that monster storm, many limbs were in the way I think it was seven 4" to 8+" ones. Thankfully I had my Silki Saw.

I think we have pics, it was actually a tunnel that I sawed through.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Fred... Thinking that too much fuel is better than not enough, and if I run i into a stranded rider, then I can assist without sacrificing my own needs. For the 1st while I hope to do short trips gradually going longer, but you know the island is narrow and long, hard to really get to far from a service station, I think, but want to be prepared for anything.

If i really want to get into overnighters, I will pack some side bags. Im duplicating some moose racks for the rear. And adding in some future mounting points for bags.
I'm curious how effective bear spray is. Ive seen it used on silly TV shows, and it seems to work well when you spray it at your own eyes. How effective is it on a real bear?
My bike came with a 12 v pigtail installed on the battery for maintaining. I was planing to adapt the compressor and any other 12v devices I may require to that. Does anyone else do that or is it better to use a portable battery to power these devices and have a constant power source recharging the battery backup?
Thanks for reading and replying. Have a fun weekend.

Gulfrider.. I researched the forum and agree the ride-on is the best sealant for the tubed tires. Going to be installing that before I hit any trails.

A sharp hand saw is an excellent and lightweight item to pack. Thanks
 

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Does seem to be a shortage of videos showing bear spray successfully driving off grizzlies.
Works on Black bears though.
There are other confrontations where a handy can of pepper spray would be nice to have:

 

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bear attacks are so rare. in Alaska there havw been six fatal events in the last ten years. pepper spray is super effective against any animal. if the spray is older than six months though it is next to worthless. whats better than a weapon or spray is to watch a youtube video about bear behavior. I live in a neighborhood where we see dozens of bears a year. they have no interest in humans unless you attract them by leaving food or garbage out.
Does seem to be a shortage of videos showing bear spray successfully driving off grizzlies.
Works on Black bears though.
There are other confrontations where a handy can of pepper spray would be nice to have:

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ive roads tons by myself and id say swap your tire to an a tv one that can run flat like black diamond sti. wear a good jacket and pants that are waterproof. carry a real bivi sack. keep your bike well maintained and it wont break down is perhaps the best advice. also look for a new friend to ride with. your situation of losing a riding buddy to a new marriage is not unique to you. post up on advrider or craigslist. plenty of other folks are looking for people to ride with!

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"if the spray is older than six months though it is next to worthless." - that seems a little extreme considering numerous discussions of can construction and grdual ppressure loss scenarios. Printed expiration dates are a good guideline

For example:

Gby Lisa Maloney



"You may have noticed that your can of bear spray has an expiration date printed on it. How seriously should you take those little numbers?

..





Bottom line: Your bear spray won't magically go from full power to zero power the minute its expiration date arrives, but all aerosols do lose power over time. Your bear spray might work to some degree once it's past the expiration date -- but why would you want to introduce an extra element of risk or uncertainty into dealing with bears?







So do yourself a favor and pay attention to that expiration date. And keep in mind that your bear spray's performance can be affected by how you store it, too. Extremes of heat and cold will reduce itself performance, and extreme heat (say, being stored in a hot car) may even cause the pressurized contents to explode. How's that for an unpleasant scenario?​


[h=3]But Bear Mace Is Expensive![/h]At around $50 (or more) per can, bear spray can seem pricey. But that works out to just $10 to $15 per year over the life of each canister -- a lot cheaper than a post-mauling hospital stay.




[h=3]But What If an Expired Can of Bear Spray Is All I Have?[/h]If an expired can of bear spray is all you have, I say take it! There's no guarantee that it'll work, but some chance is better than none -- and every expert I've ever talked to agrees that just having the can of bear spray in your hand can give you the courage to do the right thing when a bear charges: Stand your ground."

I guess I'll just have to let the bear get a bit closer with my old cans, maybe I can smack him in the nose with one





 

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I've seen bear repellent work on a very motivated grizzly sow with a first year cub.
 

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