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Discussion Starter #1
I had a buddy in town last week that wanted to do some riding. We decided to do some desert riding then camp on the edge of Silver City.
My overnight pack (actually 3 days worth)...


His overnight pack...

^^^Notice the bald tire?^^^

We rode the desert loop south of Murphy and hit the memorable spots.










Marc overheats pretty easy so we needed frequent water and rest breaks. Aside from that it was relatively drama-free until we got to camp. We were planning to eat before setting up camp when Marc realized he had lost the keys to the padlocks on his rear case. Luckily, one of the overland guys showed up a couple hours later with a cordless cutoff saw. He found the keys inside the locked case.

Next morning we broke camp and waited for the sun to dry out our gear and warm our bones. Stopped at one of the mines on the way out. Not exactly sure what the car is (1940 Buick?) but it used to run a winch to the mine.





Then over the hills and back home for steak, beverages, and tall tales.
 

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Saturday was supposed to be an easy day-ride. We got a late start but Marc managed to whittle down his load to around 60 pounds. We rode pretty hard from Poison Creek stage stop over to Spanish Charly, then headed to the horse traps. Between 2 tire pump-ups, a few water breaks, and having to reconfigure all the stuff on the back of the KLR's broken subframe, we got way behind schedule.



We finally got to the horse traps but not before the KLR went down a couple times. The last being at the turnaround. Unfortunately that caused the airbox to be filled with fuel and it wouldn't start. Minor disassembly to Dump out then air out.


Marc was overheating, out of water, and medically unstable. The thermometer showed 115 and I was a little nervous. We got the KLR started and I noticed the tire was low but kept my mouth shut. We needed to get out of there. We ran up the trail about 4 miles and met an old guy on a side-by-side who offered us cold water and Marc drank about a gallon. He was the only other guy we saw on the trail all day.

About 6 miles later he was flat again. Pumped it up and headed for Leslie Gulch to cool down.


He pumped up one more time and made it almost 100 yards. Of course, he had no new tube and the old one was wasted. Best we could do was stuff my spare 18 in his 17" tire and hope for the best.


47 miles later we were back home. He was planning to leave at noon the next morning. As he left, I suggested he check the air pressure on his tires at the gas station. An hour later I was on my way with a trailer to pick him up. After a run to Cycle Gear and yet another tire and tube replacement, he was headed to Bend just after 5.


TW did just fine, as did the Jerod Loop. One more thing...

I'm still not dead yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
With the exception of one 2-3 mile section, it's all stuff we've ridden in the past with Admiral or gravel road getting there. The adventure part is all Marc. Apparently TW reliability is boring.
 

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The Jerod Loop 2.0 (JL2) was great! I could easily pack enough for a 3-5 day ride in there. Weight distribution was better and no part of my gear was wider than my legs or shoulders. I stuffed the tent and poles down the left side and rain fly down the other. Clothes were in a waterproof drawstring bag, food and stove in another, toiletries and misc in another. I'll put my water jug down the left leg next time as it got warm from the exhaust after riding all day. I'll probably fine tune the attachment system just for esthetics but it's a success otherwise.
 

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The Jerod Loop 2.0 (JL2) was great! I could easily pack enough for a 3-5 day ride in there. Weight distribution was better and no part of my gear was wider than my legs or shoulders. I stuffed the tent and poles down the left side and rain fly down the other. Clothes were in a waterproof drawstring bag, food and stove in another, toiletries and misc in another. I'll put my water jug down the left leg next time as it got warm from the exhaust after riding all day. I'll probably fine tune the attachment system just for esthetics but it's a success otherwise.
The JL2 Bag seems like a cool idea.. several hundred dollars cheaper then the alternative options..lol
Probably not as waterproof ..
What size bag would you recommend and how did you close the waist ?
Mike from N.C.
 

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Yeah, just thriftshop cargos. I suspect that they may have been lady-cop pants. There was some elastic on the hips. The button says "The Force" on it. I ran a life jacket strap through the rear belt loops, rolled and buckled it like my yellow drybag. Everything inside was in waterproof drawstring bags so I don't really worry about being waterproof. Washable too.
 

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Very cool trip and looks like you two covered all the bases with good and less than good experiences on this trip.
Thanks for posting!
 

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I think I will start watching the thrift shops for a large pair of leather pants.
Mike
 
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Discussion Starter #13
I was hoping for some Carharts that we're all worn out.
 
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Those would be perfect! The higher waist would give more room in the rolltop section. Someone suggested starting with a pair of coveralls too.

Whatever the case, the theory is sound. I rode for a week on trails with my saddlebags and around 60 pounds of gear. It worked fine but I could definitely feel the weight back there on steep climbs and quick turns. The JL2 keeps the weight narrower and forward so it's barely noticeable. If I were touring on mostly good roads, the saddlebags were great and would be my preference. But for trails or aggressive riding, JL2 all the way.

One other possible option to be a little more water resistant.

My grandpa worked in the woods and always swore by tin pants. He and his brother toured the country in the late '40s on their Harleys and that was their bad weather riding gear.
 

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Another brand is the Duluth Trading Co. fire hose pant. These pants also can come with double front layer. Made from the same weave as fire hose, so they are very water resistant, but probably breath better than the tin pant. I've owned several pair when I worked in the mountains. I like the cut and fit and they wear a long time. The price is reasonable.
 

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I forgot I have a pair of these pants/coveralls from Tractor Supply. Very warm and as you can see in the photos, a generous upper back panel much like the front. Lots of material to work with.
Tractor Supply Coveralls
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Any of those should work. For the type of riding I do, being waterproof is probably secondary to being rip resistant. Even the Giant loop bags aren't waterproof. They come with waterproof inner liner bags.

The other component I didn't really mention was the Tusk rack. It still has the down-legs like my trusty Cycleracks did, but they're narrower and the JL2 actually straddles much better. Overall, it's a more rigid rack too.
 

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I had a buddy in town last week that wanted to do some riding. We decided to do some desert riding then camp on the edge of Silver City.
My overnight pack (actually 3 days worth)...


His overnight pack...

^^^Notice the bald tire?^^^

We rode the desert loop south of Murphy and hit the memorable spots.










Marc overheats pretty easy so we needed frequent water and rest breaks. Aside from that it was relatively drama-free until we got to camp. We were planning to eat before setting up camp when Marc realized he had lost the keys to the padlocks on his rear case. Luckily, one of the overland guys showed up a couple hours later with a cordless cutoff saw. He found the keys inside the locked case.

Next morning we broke camp and waited for the sun to dry out our gear and warm our bones. Stopped at one of the mines on the way out. Not exactly sure what the car is (1940 Buick?) but it used to run a winch to the mine.





Then over the hills and back home for steak, beverages, and tall tales.
With me taking over carrying the lunch bucket when Mrs. Admiral and I go riding, I think the homemade loop bag might do the trick. I have a little hard time getting my leg over the bike and add a lunch bag on the rear rack makes it that much more difficult. I'll drag some old work pants out of the box and work on my version.

Not trying to knock on Marc but I'm glad I didn't hear the TW having those issues. Maybe Marc should switch to a TW. Didn't he also have some "Marc moments" on the ORBDR? You're a good friend for sure!
 
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Discussion Starter #20
Yup. You heard some of the stories. I have more now.
 
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