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Some years ago, a few of you 'old timers' might recall that mrgizmow was planning to add a two stroke outboard to his kayak. At that time, it was a -Why Not- but as long distance paddling became more of a challenge, the idea became more attractive. Tried to find my old kayak post, but had no luck. After more than a few years it seemed, this was a project that needed to be finished. Had to trim the drive assembly 8 inches to make it look and function in way that seemed appropriate to the kayak. All tasks pretty doable for the average "do-it-yourselfer". Am happy with the results. Easy starts, reasonably quiet, and scoots along at likely 12mph. Weight gain in minimal and motor easily tilts up allowing smooth paddling with no extra effort. Not nearly as scary as the 18 mile off-pavement jaunt I recently took on the XT-225. Hope all is well with you all. Take care. ===========
 

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Love it! Keep creating/modifying. You have a major nack for for it... motivates me to do more - But I just recently started adjusting my Dubs valves, lol. I've got work to do!
 

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Great job Gerry.
Your hull speed in knots theoretically should be 1.34 x square root of waterline length in feet. Apparently your 2-stroke puts out enough thrust to push beyond that ~7 mph. Neat.
Happy motoring, welcome to the entertaining world of powered micro-craft.
 

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Very cool Gerry! My three kayaks are all electric motored. One has a 22 pound thrust and the other 2 are 30 and 40 pound thrusts. 2 were factory made and the third I made myself as far as the electric motors. Where yours has it all over all of mine is in the max speed. I can get about 6 MPH at full throttle but normally fish trolling lures at around 1.5-2 MPH. Up here most lakes don't allow anything but electric motors so you can't come. Another disadvantage I have is the battery weighs around 70 pounds but the motors are pretty light. Now for the advantages, NO NOISE. My steering is done from the sliding foot pedals with SS cables attached to the motor, same as if I had a rudder. I can fish pretty much all day long with a good AGM deep cycle battery at around 110 AH capacity. Mine are tandem 2 seater kayaks except my fishing rig is one seat and highly equipped for trolling a couple lines behind me.

I always wondered how much fun it would be to drop a 6 HP Evinrude motor on the back of one and go for a blast down my lake that is 9 miles long. Bet I could hit close to 20 MPH but kayaks are not designed to be stable on plane. I am pretty fine with just going 3,4 or even 5 MPH with no paddling getting back to the ramp.

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GaryL
 

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Growing up living right on a motorboat lake was quite a blast for me and my brother. I was the Gerry of our duo and always trying to push things to the limits. We had a couple ski boats and a couple fishing row boats with 3.5 and 6 HP motors. The plate on one row boat said Up To a 6 HP motor. I found a real nice 20 HP Merc motor at the bottom of the lake and rescued it. After getting it all cleaned up and the water out and dried off it fired right up and I just had to try it. We put it on the row boat for a 6 HP motor and took it for a spin. Brother up in the front and me at the controls. Did I mention that row boats are not really designed to go real fast or even up on plane? Hold on to your hat. That motor pushed the light row boat at break neck speeds probably well over 30 MPH but wow was it unstable at much over half throttle. When the water was mirror smooth we could blast it to the max but never when there were any waves or wakes. We could not do a full throttle hole shot because the back end would dig and the front end would stand up and toss brother to the back. Had to slowly give it gas but wow did we have fun with that monster until we got busted by the boat cops. BTW, their cop boat couldn't catch us but being on a small lake it was pretty easy to find us criminals. Here in NY I think your gas kayak would be outlawed even on motorboat lakes because I doubt it has a plate designating the size of motor it can have. Most of the big lakes here that do allow motorboats and jet skis also have speed limits now and the cops have radar guns to clock the speeds. I have been in boats that can hit 100 MPH and on jet skis that can get close to that but NY is a Kill Joy state. How cool would it be to put a TW200 motor in a row boat with a shaft and prop out the back.

GaryL
 

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I am quite fond of silent electric propulsion in my electro-yaks. They are light enough to taken roof-top 4x4-ing into remote alpine lakes unlikely to ever see power boats. 55 lb MinnKota thrust has been enough to tow a canoes full of camp gear, people and dogs to a remote shoreline camp a few times. No noise or odor is a big plus. Once got quite close to a family of otters which was special for me but catching deer drinking is common at first light as is scaring beavers.
Gerry has a good design solving all the basic safety requirements. It is not easy to start and manage a remote stern mounted gas motor, including hoisting motor out of water when fouled on lines, cables, seaweed and other submerged trouble. However foot steering was one addition I incorporated in my designs since it is easy done to a conventional sit-inside kayak, just like Gary's.
 

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I am quite fond of silent electric propulsion in my electro-yaks. They are light enough to taken roof-top 4x4-ing into remote alpine lakes unlikely to ever see power boats. 55 lb MinnKota thrust has been enough to tow a canoes full of camp gear, people and dogs to a remote shoreline camp a few times. No noise or odor is a big plus. Once got quite close to a family of otters which was special for me but catching deer drinking is common at first light as is scaring beavers.
Gerry has a good design solving all the basic safety requirements. It is not easy to start and manage a remote stern mounted gas motor, including hoisting motor out of water when fouled on lines, cables, seaweed and other submerged trouble. However foot steering was one addition I incorporated in my designs since it is easy done to a conventional sit-inside kayak, just like Gary's.
My yellow 2 seat Yak has a very simple motor lift but these do present a secondary issue. If the motor does have reverse there is nothing that locks the motor in the down position so reverse is useless. This is both good and bad. If the motor is locked in down and you slam a submerged rock or stump it could do some serious damage. If it is free to glide over obstructions it is a much better plan. Much like a heavy load placed on the rear rack of our TWs there is a lot of torgue applied while trailering the kayak with the motor in place and usually lifted. I have replaced the little locking plate on my Minikota motors a few times now because the plate brakes. My kayak lakes here are mostly deep water ones so not much trouble with hitting submerged objects but I am very careful when I go up into the head water streams feeding the lake. I did run over a very long length of braided fishing line that totally fouled the prop and required me to get to shore and remove the plastic prop so I could unwind it from behind the prop shaft. That type of line is mighty tough.

Powered kayaks were a must for me because I often fish down the 4 miles of lake to the dam early in the morning. By the time I get to the dam and start heading back the wind has kicked up and always from the ramp toward the dam so I am fighting it all the way back. I don't mind some exercise but paddling 4 miles into a stiff wind is a bit much.

GaryL
 

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Or this!

 
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