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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Mountain, if you can get that toaster sorted out they tend to run forever. I believe that vintage has a points type ignition so wondering if you can do an electronic ignition conversion at a reasonable price.
Yes, I've heard good things about the engines. I haven't had time to clean the carbs and add some fuel filters, but I'm hoping that is all it will take.
I will likely leave it as points ignition. Every other vehicle I own would be disabled by a large enough EMP, but perhaps the toaster would keep running since there are no computer chips controlling anything? Hopefully I never have to find out.
 

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I'm lucky to have had 3 BMW twins over the years.
80s - 2010s. 1 used, 2 new.
Racked up a combined total of well over 150,000 miles on them.
Lots of great trips!
Never any mechanical or electrical issues with any of them, but always good maintenance. Just normal wear items, like brake pads, filters, plugs, etc.
Moderate handling & performance upgrades to all.
I've had a lot of bikes through the years, those 3 are in the top 5 of all of them.
An old, good basic condition Beemer is a treasure!
 

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Yes, those bikes are very robust and very easy to work on. Was able to pull the jugs off myself very easily to replace the base seals to the crankcase. The shaft drive assembly had a small leak so I pulled it and took it to a local BMW repair shop to have new seals put in. Also pulled the transmission while at it to put Honda spec grease on the clutch splines as that is a regular maintenance item for the dry plate clutch assembly.

Parts availability was very good for that machine in 2007, when I did the restoration. Was able to replace all the control cables and even got a new instrument cluster for it.

Was absolutely leak free and trouble free for the next year until totaled
 

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Wow that bike looks clean and in great shape. Sorry it is gone.
[/QUOTE]

Thanks, sorry it is gone too. She was a beauty when I was done with the restoration. A smooth, relaxing cruiser. Even handled twisty mountain roads well when pushed hard for the type and vintage. Had a trip planned to tour the Tail of the Dragon with a friend who had a sweet R1200C but the bike got totaled before we could go. Gave up street bikes after the accident and worked my way from old dirt bikes up to small bore dual sports when enough time had passed.
 

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One of my Beemers...a 1995 R100R 'Mystic'. (this one not mine)
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Land vehicle Automotive tail & brake light


It was really a cool bike. 1,000cc, 5-spd., triple discs, oil cooler. Clean, simple and light (for a BMW!)
The red color was much brighter and "redder" than this.
I replaced the standard "pre-muffler" under the tranny and the big, heavy, too-quiet muffler with a custom built SS Y-pipe & carbon fiber straight-through cannister muff. Looked & sounded great!
Braided SS brake lines. Polished late model valve covers.
Removed tacky Mystic "stick-on" from fender and added plain, simple, basic, narrow silver pinstripes.
All my usual stuff.
A good looking, great handling, semi-fast, quick stopping, comfortable little hot-rod.
Can't remember why I sold it?
Oh, yeah...to buy a new Triumph!

Fastest bike I ever owned. Clocked at 156. Her name was "Hoochie Mama!"
Wheel Tire Fuel tank Plant Vehicle
 

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[QUOTE
One of my Beemers...a 1995 R100R 'Mystic'. (this one not mine)
[/QUOTE]

Very nice! One of the last of the airheads before the oilhead era?
 

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Yes, the Mystic overlapped the oilhead models a couple of years.
Basically a "factory custom", based on the R100GS chassis & engine with some R100R parts and a number of Mystic only parts.
Unfortunately, it was not a "hot rod" at all...but it should have been!
Oh, well...
 

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BMW makes, or made, great bikes. Prior to the current Woke Extreme Environmentalism era.

Right now, the electronics are so complex as to be indecipherable. Same as German cars. The insulation on wiring is soy based - tasty to barn mice, which can destroy a wiring harness and thus the bike, in one winter.

I had one of the last good ones - a 2009 R1200GS. GREAT machine - but heavy. A medical issue (phlebitis with my leg) on the road, and while in a situation where medical care was not available (Joplin, Missouri, a day after the tornado) taught me (on the road to Dallas, on business) that this cycle was just too big for me and my health.

It was enormously saleable, and so that's what happened.

SINCE then, I would think twice...three, four times...before buying a BMW. Of ANY sort.
 

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2004 R1150GSA BMW, 2018 Van Van, 2004 V star 1100
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If your a technician, there are so many sweet BMWs to be had. Staying on top of tech curve means new models constantly and the wealthy must have newest. So much on used market. BMW has really made the effort to make their bikes serviceable and it shows. So much info on the infernal net for repairing the known issues makes em great used. I find them refreshing to work on, fairly well laid out they are. If you go after 2004 the Canbus system used for the electronics is right super though confusing for some due to learning curve. I actually gave up on the carburetor model I had as it was just too hard to get jetting correct with ethanol fuel (1978 /7) Even the GS models are best for on road use just too heavy for mere mortals in the rougher stuff IMHO. Fire roads are not “off road” IMHO.
yeah tasty wiring. Poor thinking by Bosch. Showed up in the 80s on Volvos. I’ve replaced many a harness that dissolved on its own or eaten by rodents. To be fair, I’ve have rodents dine on just about any wire irrespective of brand. What’s up with that anyway?
 

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If your a technician, there are so many sweet BMWs to be had. Staying on top of tech curve means new models constantly and the wealthy must have newest. So much on used market. BMW has really made the effort to make their bikes serviceable and it shows. So much info on the infernal net for repairing the known issues makes em great used. I find them refreshing to work on, fairly well laid out they are. If you go after 2004 the Canbus system used for the electronics is right super though confusing for some due to learning curve. I actually gave up on the carburetor model I had as it was just too hard to get jetting correct with ethanol fuel (1978 /7) Even the GS models are best for on road use just too heavy for mere mortals in the rougher stuff IMHO. Fire roads are not “off road” IMHO.
yeah tasty wiring. Poor thinking by Bosch. Showed up in the 80s on Volvos. I’ve replaced many a harness that dissolved on its own or eaten by rodents. To be fair, I’ve have rodents dine on just about any wire irrespective of brand. What’s up with that anyway?
The wire casings are soy based now since petroleum based wire insulation is evil. European cars are trying to find a solution for a problem they created. My neighbors BMW needs a $9,000 wiring harness due to the rats eating it.
 

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Thank you. I can't take any credit for the bike. Whoever customized and pieced it together had some good ideas on how it should look.
I received it a couple of months ago for a very small price from a very generous friend that didn't want to hassle with it's problems.
The frame and most of the suspension is from a 1987 RT maybe, but the engine, tank, headlight, gauges, etc are from a 70s R75/5. Then there are a lot of custom parts too.
It definitely needs some electrical help and carb maintenance.
It is designed as a scrambler, but is geared very high and I don't know if that can be changed since it has the single-sided drive shaft. It does better on gravel roads than I expected but even starting from a stop on pavement involves a good amount of clutch feathering.
Those bikes have little “adjustability“ to gearing. I owned an R100 for quite a while. It was a good bike. Check out that your carburetors are in good shape (including vacuum diaphragms. Mine was sensitive to synchronizing between the two carbs. Borrow someone’s mercury sticks if you can. (It won’t ever pull away like a TW though!).
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Major update. The other day I was casually driving to work in my car and out of nowhere had the sudden realization that the BMW might have simply run out of gas when it died on me. It had lots of gas in the tank when I left my house, but when I came out of the hardware store I noticed that it was leaking gas out of one carb. Apparently, it was leaking more than I realized and continued leaking while I rode home. Not good to waste 2-3 gallons of gas on a 35 mile ride.
Tonight I put some gas in the dry tank and it fired up like a champ, despite only being 40 degrees in the garage.
I guess it was me that took the ride of shame, only partially the fault of the bike's leaky carb.
It still needs some carb work, but less than previously feared.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Those bikes have little “adjustability“ to gearing. I owned an R100 for quite a while. It was a good bike. Check out that your carburetors are in good shape (including vacuum diaphragms. Mine was sensitive to synchronizing between the two carbs. Borrow someone’s mercury sticks if you can. (It won’t ever pull away like a TW though!).
Thanks for the advice. I will need to give them a good cleaning and inspection before next summer.
 

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Did that bike come form Idaho? I rode with a guy I ran into on the ADV rider forum, who had a bike that looked just like that, a few years back. We rode up Fall Creek just outside Swan Valley. We stopped at the commissary in Swan Valley for some fuel, and the kids there were much more impressed with that beamer than my 690. I did feel kind of bad for that guy on the trails though. It was cool that when the beamer went over it didn't go all the way down though. Just kind of sat there propped up on the head. That made it much easier to lift. It is a cooler looking bike than my 690. Hope you get it sorted out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Good story, I love Swan Valley and hope to do some riding there some day. To my knowledge, the bike was made by a custom builder back East, then purchased by my friend, then to me.
It is possible that it made a stop with an owner in Idaho before my friend, but I don't have any info about that.
This bike is geared very high and seems like it would be difficult on anything more technical than a gravel road. It is also heavy and has a terrible during turning radius. It does have the engine crash bars, so yes, once tipped, it is still sitting at about 45 degrees.
 

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... To be fair, I’ve have rodents dine on just about any wire irrespective of brand. What’s up with that anyway?
[/QUOTE]

They also love the vacuum hoses in my Class C. Doghouse insulation apparently makes great nests. They say Marmots in the Sierras have a keen tooth for antifreeze and will chew through coolant hoses for a swig. Saw a few parked cars at trail heads circled with chicken wire with a few mothballs tossed underneath for good measure
 

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... To be fair, I’ve have rodents dine on just about any wire irrespective of brand. What’s up with that anyway?
They also love the vacuum hoses in my Class C. Doghouse insulation apparently makes great nests. They say Marmots in the Sierras have a keen tooth for antifreeze and will chew through coolant hoses for a swig. Saw a few parked cars at trail heads circled with chicken wire with a few mothballs tossed underneath for good measure
[/QUOTE]
Someone mentioned recently that wiring harnesses are made with Soy, so they must smell like food.
 

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[/QUOTE]
Someone mentioned recently that wiring harnesses are made with Soy, so they must smell like food.
[/QUOTE]

…but is it non-GMO soy? Don’t want no stinkin Frankenrats on my watch
 
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