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I like hitting the "Like" button for littletommy, or LT as I call him ever since he liked the chopper kid avatar I suggested for him.
He is one of the rare voices of consistent wisdom and compassion here.
 

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Don't know if you have noticed, but there is a little button to click below that says "Like". When you click this button out of appreciation for the tips and help, it gives the person helping you a little adrenaline rush and he likes that. Ha Ha Ha!! 🤣
Yeah, I don't like that button. My thoughts are more nuanced than the button.
 

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Don't know if you have noticed, but there is a little button to click below that says "Like". When you click this button out of appreciation for the tips and help, it gives the person helping you a little adrenaline rush and he likes that. Ha Ha Ha!! 🤣
right on LT! and i find there are a few who ask alot of questions who never give any likes. i find myself not giving any responses after a while
 

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right on LT! and i find there are a few who ask alot of questions who never give any likes. i find myself not giving any responses after a while
Yep that happens. We're all filled with stress and worry and for me, I need a little emotional uplift once in a while. (y) I always admire a thankful and gracious attitude.
 

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Well if one is to be characterized by subtle shades of meaning or expression maybe our responses here should be more nuanced too?:)
(We sometimes poke a bit of fun here)
Riding on gravel? Perhaps "Only if done with extreme care to appreciate the fine point distinctions of the gravel that you have to be very detail oriented to notice" would have been a better response judging by my dictionary definition of nuanced. Please feel free to disregard any former inadequately nuanced postings.:cool:
 

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I like hitting the "Like" button for littletommy, or LT as I call him ever since he liked the chopper kid avatar I suggested for him.
He is one of the rare voices of consistent wisdom and compassion here.
And to think, that I thought, for months and months and months that was a genuine picture of LT with a wig all this time.

He is such a poser! :D

Like Like Like Like Like Like Like Like Like Like

Marty
 

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Riding on gravel? Perhaps "Only if done with extreme care to appreciate the fine point distinctions of the gravel that you have to be very detail oriented to notice" would have been a better response judging by my dictionary definition of nuanced.
LOL. I'm def not above an LOL.
 

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I have a scar as a memory of a crash as a new rider on a gravel road. I'd only add two things to the good advice others have already said; 1) - Get rid of that front tire "Deathwing" if you plan to ride much on gravel roads. There are far better, and safer tires for the front wheel. 2) Stay off the front brake. Don't even touch it. The rear brake should suffice, especially since you'll be reducing your speed on gravel, especially as a newer rider. I have a few more miles behind me now but gotta confess - Gravel still spooks me. 😬
 

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Go to a 60T or 65T rear sprocket. You'll have lots of torque, but won't be able to go very fast. ;) I primarily ride in the forest on dirt roads and trails, so I have absolutely 0 need for top end speed.
 

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As has already been said, weighting the outer peg and the front wheel make A huge difference. I’ve been off-roading all my life and am not new to physics, but I’m a new rider, so the application of these skills on two wheels takes practice. I’ve had a good fortune of some good friends that are great riders and, we are all talking on radios while riding, so the real-time tips and tricks have really shortened my learning curve. I’d say that the two tips above have been the most helpful for me In the loose stuff.
 

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Also, on my first real ride on the bike, I laid it down in a turn on a graded gravel road going about 25mph. Yes. I had the ”Death Wing” tire. But, I completely blame myself. Everyone in front of me was going the same speed or faster, some on the TW’s as well. I didn’t weight the outer peg, was sitting back on the seat, was tense, was NOT smooth... pretty much everything you’re not supposed to do. So, yeah, lots of great advice here!
 

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I’d say that the two tips above have been the most helpful for me In the loose stuff.
Steve this is great. It would be awesome if you would start a thread and share a few more basic things you've learned about riding on the TW that make the experience safer and more effective. Maybe other people could chime in with basic operating principles they use, as well. Personally, I'm having a hard time on sand. I'd love to know how people are using the stock gearing to ride well on that surface.
 

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It feels a bit silly and obvious to add this to the well thought-out and well-worded posts above, but here goes: as a fairly new rider with 50% of the time spent on heavily graveled roads, my comfort and skill is vastly improved when I remember to look as far in front as possible. When I do that, the bike moves how it needs to and I float in place. When I’m feeling tense, it’s usually because I’m only looking about 20’ in front of the tire, or (shame) closer. Of course my comment might be disqualified since, on a recent ride, my front tire began wobbling back and forth violently when I hit an extra thick patch of fresh gravel. I experienced a moment of panic visualizing being thrown from the bike, but upon thinking of this thread, I just let off the throttle to slow enough to regain control... no braking. And no breaking. 😜

I too notice that keeping my weight forward and staying perpendicular to the ground in turns has made gravel much easier.
 

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Live in a very rural location on a so called gravel/dirt road, several km to paved roads- lots of time year around riding on them. Given the wide tires and TW's light front end weight distribution- had to really do much to improve gravel road performance. Keep speed down, don't let ATVs zipping by you - urine you off. Gentile in turns. Use rear brake. Get use to "floating" on the road, keep speed down.
 

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Steve this is great. It would be awesome if you would start a thread and share a few more basic things you've learned about riding on the TW that make the experience safer and more effective. Maybe other people could chime in with basic operating principles they use, as well. Personally, I'm having a hard time on sand. I'd love to know how people are using the stock gearing to ride well on that surface.
I don’t know that I’m the guy that should be delivering new rider tips, but I can tell you this; It has been absoutely invaluable to ride with experienced riders AND, being able to talk real-time. Small bits of information when going over obstacles have helped tremendously... so thankful for it!
 

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(We sometimes poke a bit of fun here)
Riding on gravel? Perhaps "Only if done with extreme care to appreciate the fine point distinctions of the gravel that you have to be very detail oriented to notice" would have been a better response judging by my dictionary definition of nuanced. Please feel free to disregard any former inadequately nuanced postings.:cool:
Such as coarse, sticky, well packed lime rock
0521200952-00.jpg


VS fresh dumped, left over steel mill, melt shop impurities (aka SLAG) ground to somewhat a finer mesh. Or, the bottom scrapings (crumbs) if you will.

0521201056-00.jpg


Sorry, just couldn't resist as this thread came to mind when riding by.

:rolleyes:
 
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