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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So....I've been given the poor advice of leaning into turns. On firm ground the TW leans like a dream but on gravel and other loose terrain it slides out. And I don't mean fun time drifting. I've yet to see tires suggested with any edge to prevent this. I'm well aware of bicycle tires that handle these conditions well and wonder, how do other T Dubbers deal with this? Is there a dual sport tires with some edge or are all the aftermarket tires more rounded for street?

Or are there any riding tips that could help control the slide without dislocating my shoulder or worse?
 

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I don't know about the tires... mine are stock and I have not have any problems at all with the front end misbehaving, either on dirt trails (dry or wet) or on gravel road. I am a fairly experienced rider (almost 4 decades) with a fair bit of dirt and a lot of very fast sport bike time. IME, if a rider is having trouble with losing the front end on a motorcycle while cornering it is likely due to technique - specifically not transferring weight to the rear tire by using the throttle. In general terms, motorcycles are designed to slow while predominately upright and to turn properly while under some throttle application. Mix those two and slow while turning, overloading the front, and the front end of most any bike may wash out. Could that be an issue here?
 

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I rode nearly 200 miles of gravel this past weekend on the stock 180-80-14 Bridgestone. It rides as good as any dual sport tire I have ever ridden. Just make sure to air it down when off road.
I run no higher than 15 lbs off road and 28 lbs on road.... Might help ya.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I'm running stock tires too and I don't weigh much so maybe taking some air out of my tires and leaning back with a little more throttle may be a huge help. I have a lot of cycle experience but my motor experience is limited to motorized bicycles and ATVs..till 2 weeks ago! :)

Thanks for the great advice!
 

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I once asked my tire man for replacement tires that wouldn’t skid on gravel — he just chuckled, and replaced the Pirellis on my ’88 Quattro ……..

Leaning into a dirt turn is asking for it, powering in (or out) on a TW is “problematic” — the tires are too big, and the engine is underpowered ………….

As far as your body goes — “upright” is where you want to be — ‘cos anything else is going to see you picking boulders out of your butt ………..

“Feather” the front brake — no more than two fingers at most — you don’t want to stop the front wheel — just get it “under control” …………..

Now comes the one thing you can do — with a big grin on your face ……..

Back wheel — and hit the brake like you mean it — doesn’t matter where your body-weight is at — learn to control the bike with the rear brake. She’ll try to straighten up on you at first, might even put her nose in the dirt — but that rear brake is the most controllable thing you have.

Think of it as a sea anchor — instant sanity — and unlike the front wheel, you can lock the rear as much as you want …………..

Lock the front — and you’re going down — and if not, those wide forks will see you go off in a straight line

So lock the rear — and control the bike with your body …………….
 

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The tires are part of it, but you need to learn off road cornering and body position techniques. In a very general sense, you need to push with the foot on the footpeg of the direction you want to turn, and sit more upright over the bike. Want to turn left, push the left footpeg with the left foot while keeping your upper body more upright. This takes practice, but it really works. Please don't lean with the bike into a corner while riding off road. Even with good tires you're likely to push or washout.

Generally, the TW is not as powerful as a regular dirt bike, so try to avoid the "power cornering" a dirt bike can do.

Here's a link to get you started which will provide a much better way for you to understand the techniques than I could ever explain:

Basic Off-Road Riding Techniques for Adventure Bikes - ADV Pulse
 

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Generally, you don't want to round off the corners off road like you would on the street. On more powerful dirt bike you would just use the point and squirt technique, but as mentioned, the TW doesn't really have the balls for such manoeuvres, so just take it slow around the corners.
 

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Yeah, I'm running stock tires too and I don't weigh much so maybe taking some air out of my tires and leaning back with a little more throttle may be a huge help. I have a lot of cycle experience but my motor experience is limited to motorized bicycles and ATVs..till 2 weeks ago! :)

Thanks for the great advice!
I can't believe no one is pointing this out already, but lose the Death Wing! I run a Kenda K270 on the front, 5.10 size. It is worlds better in gravel than the stocker.

BTW, are you on Motorbicycling.com?
 

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Yeah the front tire is complete crap in dirt and gravel. It'll wash out badly. The rear tire isn't terrible, but is far from great. You can lean but not nearly as far as on asphalt. It also helps to put your inside leg forward when turning, to add some weight to the front (also slide forward on the seat). Like others said, learning correct body position is important, but it's difficult to describe in text and without being able to give good examples. :)
 

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The TW isn't an MX bike. In my mind, it begs to be ridden like a big adventure bike. On a loose surface, I want to be up on the pegs. You can control the bike by shifting your weight between the pegs, just like weighting and unweighting downhill skis. You also lower the center of gravity by standing on the pegs. On gravel, the bike is going to want to dance...just let it. Keep your weight in a neutral position, and let the bike move under you. Too far one way...just weight the other peg.

PS: I'm not qualified to give advice to anyone...so keep that in mind!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I can't believe no one is pointing this out already, but lose the Death Wing! I run a Kenda K270 on the front, 5.10 size. It is worlds better in gravel than the stocker.

BTW, are you on Motorbicycling.com?
Thanks for the suggestions and additional advice. I've yet to visit any other related forums.

It seems to me the TW is like a cross between a harley fatboy and an ATV. Neither are the raciest by nature.
 

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The main points that have already been mentioned:
Air down both front and rear. ( get rid of the front death wing, I don't have experience with it on the TW, but on the WR it was a nightmare)
Stand on the pegs or if seated move as far forward as you can on the seat, you need to have weight on the front wheel to keep it from wishing out.
If you are on roads with lots of pee gravel laid down, slow down as your going to slide.
The TW is more like a trials bike in geometry, so it likes to stay upright.
If you can find a large gravel area, practice cornering standing and seated and see how the bike reacts at different speeds.
 
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I learned my cornering from riding a mountain bike. I think the techniques are the same. When cornering lean the bike while keeping your body centered over the bike( the bike is leaning your not) and lean somewhat over the gas tank putting weight on the front wheel at the same time applying gental pressure on the front break putting added weight on the front tire. Of course no technique can overcome excessive speed. This is on dirt only or pavement with sand or gravel on it. Dirts a Flyen. SanDue
 

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Hi there Trailwomen, I found an immensely helpful resource here:

Off road motorcycling

It has been very helpful as it is geared toward back country dual sport off road riding technique (not motocross) from the African Long Distance Riding Academy. They have a lot of helpful info on their own website, but it isn't as compiled as this.

(Warning: reading the text is a little weird when printed in that the left column reads all the way to the end of page 11 before moving to the right column at the top of the second page, which is hard to remember and sometimes gets confusing,)

All the best, hope its helpful,:)
Weebles
 
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Ha ha ha, just saw your video docjeckyll2002. If this is what Trail woman is after, she can disregard my post. I seriously will not take a corner like that in all my days unless it is a last ditch effort to save my skin.

Hats off to all who can.

Weebles, still laughing at the very thought.
 

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The tires are part of it, but you need to learn off road cornering and body position techniques. In a very general sense, you need to push with the foot on the footpeg of the direction you want to turn, and sit more upright over the bike. Want to turn left, push the left footpeg with the left foot while keeping your upper body more upright. This takes practice, but it really works. Please don't lean with the bike into a corner while riding off road. Even with good tires you're likely to push or washout.

Generally, the TW is not as powerful as a regular dirt bike, so try to avoid the "power cornering" a dirt bike can do.

Here's a link to get you started which will provide a much better way for you to understand the techniques than I could ever explain:

Basic Off-Road Riding Techniques for Adventure Bikes - ADV Pulse

Admiral, I really liked those videos. Thanks for posting :D
 
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