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Hello everyone, my name is Jesse, in Tucson AZ, and I just wanted to document/photodocument the project I just completed after 2.5-3 months. First off, I just wanted to say thanks to the many contributors on this awesome forum that helped guide me as I spent many hours reading old posts to be able to get this done.
The project took me so long for three main reasons: 1. I have never done anything more than change my oil and air filter, so had no idea what I was doing, 2. I didn't have more than a hazy dream and a couple of internet pictures of what I wanted (ie no real plan), and 3. I have a day job (though admittedly I've started daydreaming about quitting it so I can do more moto customisations, which is not founded on rality once you see the photos).
Regardless, I do love the way it turned out, based most closely on the "Herr Funk TW125" posted on BikeEXIF (easy google search). More importantly, my wife loves the way it turned out, because its actually her bike (though I'm currently testing creative ways to make it officially mine) and I basically commandeered her daily commuter out from under her for 3 months. And because, as many of you know much better than I, marriage is all about finding ways that making your wife happy also makes you happy- and vice versa if you're lucky.
I'll describe the work I did to it, but only include the final pictures, but if you'd like more intermediate process details and pictures please just ask- I have PLENTY as I'm sure many of you can relate to.
Very broadly, I put the bike (a 2008 White TW200 with 4300miles) up on a stand and basically stripped it down to the frame and engine (never took the engine off) and did all the work from there: I'll attach pictures at the end.
MECHANICAL: new front and rear brakes, rebuilt front forks/seals, replaced air filter box with K&N cone filter/crankcase filter, rejetted carb with procycle jet kit (thanks again to Russandkava's post, which I responded to/detailed a bit more of the carb work there).
ELECTRICAL: Wired in a new headlight, brake light, front/rear turn signals (bought from Dime City Cycle's website). Removed the electrical box(half of the air filter box) and fabricated a new slimmer one from an ammo can I had laying around. Then rewired parts of the rear harness to accomodate this and the new gas tank. The turn signals I bought didn't have a third wire on each to plug intot he stock electrical harness up front to make them be running lights as well, and I haven't figured out how to crack that code yet by searchignthe forums- anyone who knows please let know!
COSMETIC/FABRICATION WORK:
LIGHTS: all new, as above.
FRAME: detabbed/grinded down/smoothed out all the unnecessary tabs (mostly holding in the air/electric box and plastics). I paint-matched as closely as I could the silver frame paint and hand-painted those areas and the rear seat loop (because I didn't want to have to take off the motor to powder coat the frame.)
BARS: new Renthal 7/8" low bars (the previous ones were bent from my wife's early riding days), new Speedometer/Odometer, grips and mirror from MMCC (I wouldn't necessarily recommend their products, but they're cheap), otherwise the stock electrical switches/throttle.
TANK: bought an ebay used gas tank (1976 Yamaha XS360), stripped it down, cleaned out the rust inside with Metal Rescue fluid, and had a local Tucson guy seal and repaint it. This was in total about $500 for the tank/his work, and the most expensive part of the project, but I knew if I tried painting it it would not turn out half as well. To make the tank fit the frame, I did have to grind a portion of the tank's forward posts and grind off the TW200s frame attachment post at the rear (because the xs360 tank is significantly longer). But I didn't have to do any new welding to the tank/frame to make it fit. The raised YAMAHA graphic is a stick-on number from Ebay/China.
SEAT: I used the stock seat, but cut the pan down way shorter to accomodate the new/longer tank. I cut off the middle seat support bar to make the seat sit flatter to the frame, rigged a new way using wing nuts at the rear to be able to lock the seat into place on the subframe, and shaved down the seat foam to decrease the overall sharp upward angle of the seat and allow my short (5'1") wife's feet to touch the ground a bit more easily. I reupholstered the seat using two layers of a marine-grade vinyl with a thin foam in between for texture, my wife's sewing machine with a heavy-duty needle, and my heavy duty hand stapler.
FENDERS: I bought a new front fender (Daytona fiberglass model from the Japanese WeBike community, but from a guy on ebay in Florida who wasn't using it). I cut the old front fender in half and repurposed it as the rear fender by attaching it to the support attachment welds for the rear shock. It's a bit narrow for the fat rear tire but does the job well-enough (especially in the dry desert). I also cut/shortened the stock plastic chain guard a bit in it's front and rear.
TAIL: I didn't like the square-tail look that many do because it felt a bit harsh, so I bought a generic steel seat loop off ebay, and welded it to the cut ends of the seat rails. This was my first-ever foray into welding, and it wasn't pretty, but I layed it on thick and ground it down from there, then painted over it. I fabricated a Z-shaped piece from that same ammo can that attaches under the rear seat to hold the taillight/license plate frame in place, but that wasn't strong enough to hold the weight of the taillight/license plate completely, so I welded the attached license plate frame to the rear loop for extra support. Then hand-painted it all the cover up all the indiscretions.
EXHAUST: My wife really didn't want a loud engine noise, so I forewent any slip-on exhausts or shorty mufflers (though I was real tempted for a while). I did chop the ugly little tip off the rear of the stock exhaust, for cosmetics and to make it match the length of the rear loop exactly. Just that mod gives it a little more throaty volume, but not so much as to be obnoxious. Otherwise I heat-wrapped/silicone-sprayed the header and the rear muffler with black exhaust wrap. This is effective to prevent thigh burns for a second passenger, and I do like the added visual interest of the cloth against all the other smooth metallic textures.

I think that covers it. Thanks again to everyone on this forum for the collective knowledge, and please let me know if I can assist your project in any way.
Jesse
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Lucky wife. Tasteful and simple. I like the turn signals and brake/tail light.

For the running lights, you need a dual filament bulb and blinker set-up. I have not found any threads about converting a single to dual filament. Maybe someone will chime in.

You should create an album with all your photos and post a link.

Congrats and cheers!
 

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Very tasteful & well executed...I likes it!
Now...about that exhaust wrap...🤢
 

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Well done jmix! I'm considering something like this for my next build. Would love to learn more about tank fitment, the XS tanks looks so good on the TW. Was it hard to get it fit properly? You mentioned you had to grind down portions of the mounting posts, both front and rear, how did you end up fastening the tank to the bike? Thanks for any insight, bike looks GREAT, Thumbs Up!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all for the community support. RTG, I'll get in detail here about your tank fitment question:
The TW has a system where the TW tank has cups and the frame has two front posts (with rubber discs over them to fit the cups) and one rear post.
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The XS tank was designed opposite (as I found on my tank and read online): the tank has the front posts while the front frame has the cups to accept the post.
However, the XS tank posts are "hollow" and are a larger diameter than the TWs front frame posts. So, I was able to grind off the front third of each XS tank post (with a dremel) so it would become the cup to accept the TWs frame posts.
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Also, the TW front frame posts were slightly wide for the internal width of the XS tank, so I shaved off about 2mm off of each frame post to make the front frame/posts just narrow enough to accept the XS tank.
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In the back, I shaved off the TW rear frame post entirely because the XS tank is several inches longer and the rear post in place wouldn't allow it to rest on the frame. Note that this irrevocably alters the frame from accepting the original TW tank back again (unless you weld the post back on, which wouldn't be too difficult).
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From there, it's easy to get creative to fasten the rear of the XS tank to the TW frame. I cut the extended rear tank brace (which is designed to fit over the rear frame post on the XS),
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Then drilled small holes on the side fins of that cut tank brace and threaded 550 cord through those and the holes I drilled in the frame (the frame square that accepts the seat and holds it to the frame). The 550 cord can be easily tightened or loosened by removing the seat, and allows me to take the tank off when needed. Sorry don't have a picture of this last part but can get it for you if you'd like.
Overall the tank/frame mating up front is very snug and the tank doesn't slide or move at all. For the few curb hops and wheelies I've done since, there's no movement with impact. The one critique I might have is that the tank sits fairly low on the frame, and using the existing hardware means you can't adjust the overall angle of the tank as it sits on the frame. But the final product looked great so I have no complaints. Let me know any other questions. -Jesse
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JMIX, I really like the second picture in your fist post with the camera looking up at the bike and the fence from ground level. The bike looks as if it's contemplating a Steve McQueen jump!

Marty
 

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Hello everyone, my name is Jesse, in Tucson AZ, and I just wanted to document/photodocument the project I just completed after 2.5-3 months. First off, I just wanted to say thanks to the many contributors on this awesome forum that helped guide me as I spent many hours reading old posts to be able to get this done.
The project took me so long for three main reasons: 1. I have never done anything more than change my oil and air filter, so had no idea what I was doing, 2. I didn't have more than a hazy dream and a couple of internet pictures of what I wanted (ie no real plan), and 3. I have a day job (though admittedly I've started daydreaming about quitting it so I can do more moto customisations, which is not founded on rality once you see the photos).
Regardless, I do love the way it turned out, based most closely on the "Herr Funk TW125" posted on BikeEXIF (easy google search). More importantly, my wife loves the way it turned out, because its actually her bike (though I'm currently testing creative ways to make it officially mine) and I basically commandeered her daily commuter out from under her for 3 months. And because, as many of you know much better than I, marriage is all about finding ways that making your wife happy also makes you happy- and vice versa if you're lucky.
I'll describe the work I did to it, but only include the final pictures, but if you'd like more intermediate process details and pictures please just ask- I have PLENTY as I'm sure many of you can relate to.
Very broadly, I put the bike (a 2008 White TW200 with 4300miles) up on a stand and basically stripped it down to the frame and engine (never took the engine off) and did all the work from there: I'll attach pictures at the end.
MECHANICAL: new front and rear brakes, rebuilt front forks/seals, replaced air filter box with K&N cone filter/crankcase filter, rejetted carb with procycle jet kit (thanks again to Russandkava's post, which I responded to/detailed a bit more of the carb work there).
ELECTRICAL: Wired in a new headlight, brake light, front/rear turn signals (bought from Dime City Cycle's website). Removed the electrical box(half of the air filter box) and fabricated a new slimmer one from an ammo can I had laying around. Then rewired parts of the rear harness to accomodate this and the new gas tank. The turn signals I bought didn't have a third wire on each to plug intot he stock electrical harness up front to make them be running lights as well, and I haven't figured out how to crack that code yet by searchignthe forums- anyone who knows please let know!
COSMETIC/FABRICATION WORK:
LIGHTS: all new, as above.
FRAME: detabbed/grinded down/smoothed out all the unnecessary tabs (mostly holding in the air/electric box and plastics). I paint-matched as closely as I could the silver frame paint and hand-painted those areas and the rear seat loop (because I didn't want to have to take off the motor to powder coat the frame.)
BARS: new Renthal 7/8" low bars (the previous ones were bent from my wife's early riding days), new Speedometer/Odometer, grips and mirror from MMCC (I wouldn't necessarily recommend their products, but they're cheap), otherwise the stock electrical switches/throttle.
TANK: bought an ebay used gas tank (1976 Yamaha XS360), stripped it down, cleaned out the rust inside with Metal Rescue fluid, and had a local Tucson guy seal and repaint it. This was in total about $500 for the tank/his work, and the most expensive part of the project, but I knew if I tried painting it it would not turn out half as well. To make the tank fit the frame, I did have to grind a portion of the tank's forward posts and grind off the TW200s frame attachment post at the rear (because the xs360 tank is significantly longer). But I didn't have to do any new welding to the tank/frame to make it fit. The raised YAMAHA graphic is a stick-on number from Ebay/China.
SEAT: I used the stock seat, but cut the pan down way shorter to accomodate the new/longer tank. I cut off the middle seat support bar to make the seat sit flatter to the frame, rigged a new way using wing nuts at the rear to be able to lock the seat into place on the subframe, and shaved down the seat foam to decrease the overall sharp upward angle of the seat and allow my short (5'1") wife's feet to touch the ground a bit more easily. I reupholstered the seat using two layers of a marine-grade vinyl with a thin foam in between for texture, my wife's sewing machine with a heavy-duty needle, and my heavy duty hand stapler.
FENDERS: I bought a new front fender (Daytona fiberglass model from the Japanese WeBike community, but from a guy on ebay in Florida who wasn't using it). I cut the old front fender in half and repurposed it as the rear fender by attaching it to the support attachment welds for the rear shock. It's a bit narrow for the fat rear tire but does the job well-enough (especially in the dry desert). I also cut/shortened the stock plastic chain guard a bit in it's front and rear.
TAIL: I didn't like the square-tail look that many do because it felt a bit harsh, so I bought a generic steel seat loop off ebay, and welded it to the cut ends of the seat rails. This was my first-ever foray into welding, and it wasn't pretty, but I layed it on thick and ground it down from there, then painted over it. I fabricated a Z-shaped piece from that same ammo can that attaches under the rear seat to hold the taillight/license plate frame in place, but that wasn't strong enough to hold the weight of the taillight/license plate completely, so I welded the attached license plate frame to the rear loop for extra support. Then hand-painted it all the cover up all the indiscretions.
EXHAUST: My wife really didn't want a loud engine noise, so I forewent any slip-on exhausts or shorty mufflers (though I was real tempted for a while). I did chop the ugly little tip off the rear of the stock exhaust, for cosmetics and to make it match the length of the rear loop exactly. Just that mod gives it a little more throaty volume, but not so much as to be obnoxious. Otherwise I heat-wrapped/silicone-sprayed the header and the rear muffler with black exhaust wrap. This is effective to prevent thigh burns for a second passenger, and I do like the added visual interest of the cloth against all the other smooth metallic textures.

I think that covers it. Thanks again to everyone on this forum for the collective knowledge, and please let me know if I can assist your project in any way.
Jesse
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Jesse, Dude! That's a crazy cool mod. Love it. Especially like the tank - that changes the look significantly. And great work on the seat as well. If I do another TW mod for my wife, it might look a lot more like yours here.
Thanks for sharing.

I'm at the end stages of my TW Mod project. Cranked it up and it burned WAY hot. So, the final step is reworking the carb. I'm gonna look into the carb mod your referred to. I hope you don't mind if I hit you up with additional questions.

Bruce
 

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Thanks for the encouragement Marty and Bruce. Of course I'm very happy to help any way I can. Best of luck with your project!
 

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Thanks for the encouragement Marty and Bruce. Of course I'm very happy to help any way I can. Best of luck with your project!
So Jesse, Russandkava says, "FINAL VERDICT!!! New pilot, needle, 3 shims, and the 130 main jet!!! Dang!!! I mean...dang!!! This is so rad!." For your mod, did you also find this setup to be ideal?
 

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Yup! I played around with a bunch of alternatives, but I ended up the same as him: using the Procycle kit, I am running the 130 main, 3 shims, and the new pilot and needle. It rips!
 

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That is quite a nice job, specially on a first mod project! Been collecting parts to do a similar project on my 2012 but I don’t have the complete picture in my head yet. Want to do a smaller and simpler version of my 2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200XE (one that doesn’t weigh 500lbs and I can touch the ground. Your tank looks good but I’m personally looking for a shorter rounder one to modify to fit, hopefully with at least the same or greater capacity.
Does anyone out there know of something that might make a good choice without major mods to tank (aside from mounts) that won’t interfere with the turning radius without having to mount far back.
Haha this is my very first post, I’m a total troll.
 
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