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Discussion Starter #1
Hey gang,
Just wondering, who carries and uses a Rotopax fuel container and, what size? I'm dangerously close to pushing the order button on Amazon for one of these little 1 gallon containers. And of course, a mount too. There are of course, a few dozen imitations as well to consider. But, although I've purchased the non top of the line part/component/tool etc. before and have been for the most part, pretty well satisfied but, when it comes to carrying GAS, to help me get back from where ever I go, I want to make sure that, it's still gonna be there, not only on the rack but, STILL IN THE CAN! So, with all that jargon said, those you that have used and/or, are still using one, has it lasted, any issues, does it keep sealed, when it comes time to transfer the fuel to your tank, does it pour easily and or, does it come with a good spout that allows for easy transfer?

The imitations can cost quite a bit less but, in reading some reviews, some don't seem to last or have issues. I'd rather not experiment on this issue. Just get the best and be done with it, is my opinion. What say all of you?
Scott
 

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I use the 1.75. I originally bought two and had them on my Super Tenere. no issues in 5 years. seal and pour just fine.
 

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I've got the 1.5 gallon Fuelpax series from Rotopax. I've honestly only used it a handful of times but it has never leaked. Also, I find it quick and easy to transfer fuel to the bike's tank without the use of the spout.
 

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Sorry, I can't answer your question directly but will add my perspective. I've been (over)thinking about this same purchase for over a year now myself. I split usage between in-town errands and mountain/desert trail riding. I've carried a 1 gallon can on my rack a couple times and it's awkward.
I finally decided I'm going to just order a Clarke tank and here are the reasons why; First, buying a genuine Rotopax with the necessary accessories gets me almost halfway to the purchase price of a tank. Second, it's easier and less messy because I won't have to transfer fuel from can to tank. Third, it gives me the ability to more than double capacity (XT) to 4 gallons. Fourth, it lets me put my nice factory tank on the shelf or even resell it to help cover the cost of my Clarke. And lastly, leaves my rack wide open for gear, etc.

The reviews are all over the place and it appears that the currently come with those hokey safety spouts, which is why there's a vented spout offered as an upgrade. I totally understand budget concerns and agree that knock-offs can be dicey. For me it's a case of "for a few dollars more..."
I'm going to order a Clarke for my blue bike in a couple months and if I like it I'll probably order one for my white bike as well.
 

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I have the 1.75 gallon. It's never leaked after hundreds of miles on the CycleRack. They are tough! I did build a 1 ft. square mounting plate so I could remove the locking mount and use the plate by itself on the rack. I haven't used it much and made peace (sort of) with the environazi spout. If I used it more often I would follow Michael's advice.
 

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I’ve had a couple Rotopax gas containers that have preformed wonderfully. They survived 5 trips to Moab, and there were never any leaks. As mentioned in another post, replace the gas spouts with the company’s water spouts which work much better.
I personally am waiting for Clarke to fix the mold for their TW tank. I’d rather go the larger tank route for the same reasons as mentioned in an earlier post. Unfortunately I may be waiting for a while. Until then I’ll just carry a couple Quart fuel bottles in a nap sack when needed.
 

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I carry a qt fuel bottle in a tool tube most of the time but haven't had to use it yet. I top off my tank from a can here at home if I'm planning to go about 100 miles. Most of my TW rides are 40-60-80 miles and a gas station is always less than 20 miles anyhoo.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I thank all of you that have helped with experience on this matter. For starters, the reason I'm even thinking about this is because, when the TW is mainly driven on city/county pavement, it hovers around 70-80 mpg. And that's quite a distance, especially since the Dub's got about a gallon and a half tank. But, when I hit the trail, and, depending on how the bike is ran on those trails, it commonly drops to around 60 mph, possibly less, depending hills, soft sand etc. While I, like some of you, try to have a full tank at the beginning of most of my excursions, just so I have the insurance of max distance, sometimes start out with less than a full tank due to maybe no gas stations around.

So, having that 1 gallon extra, to me, is at least having close to another 60 miles of exploration and, the return trip back to home or the campground we're staying at. I know and realize that, even 60 miles of off roading on a TW is A TON OF MILES, one can add them up in a hurry, over a couple of days of fun. So, at this time, still thinking. Thanks again.
Scott
 

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I bought one of the clones 1.3 gal and have about a 1000 miles of desert two tracks this fall and winter on it and it is holding up just fine.

Not a TW but it works for me.

202931
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I bought one of the clones 1.3 gal and have about a 1000 miles of desert two tracks this fall and winter on it and it is holding up just fine.

Not a TW but it works for me.

View attachment 202931
AWS,
That appears to be a Vanvan, correct? If so, may I ask how you like it? And, if you've had other smaller bikes for the desert, as like maybe a TW, how does it compare? Oh, by the way, thanks for the info on the Rotoplax.
Scott
 

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I love it, I have to stay on existing roads/two tracks do to it being public lands but some haven't seen vehicle traffic at least in this century. I love the ease of which it starts and how quiet it is, even the game warden was surprised how quiet it was. It handles everything I need to do. I'm averaging 80mpg running in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd most of the day and a 15-30 mile run back home. I plan to take it on some long distance runs this summer and am setting it up today with a couple of Tusk med. panniers on the sides and moving the fuel pac to the rear. and will leave the left pannier on during coyote season and take the scabbard off and put the other panier on the right for the summer. It gets an O-ring chain tomorrow.
 

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I had a homebuilt dirt bike in th early 1960's a trail 90 in college and a Matchless 500 in the mid 60's. After that it was road bikes, this is my first dual purpose bike. I did test ride a few TW's but when I got on this it was the one and it only has 91 miles on it and was half the cost of a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hey AWS,
I surely thank you for answering me. I was fairly close on obtaining a Vanvan before I got back into the TW scene. The bike, like my TW, was/is only a toy, to goof around with around our local town and trails, not a longer distance machine. I already have one for that. It's an '08 Honda GL 1800 Goldwing. But, when I was looking and getting serious, there was not ONE used Vanvan on the planet! All of them that were advertised were BRAND NEW. And, since this purchase was going to be used on a very limited time frame, and a toy at that, I was not gonna pay in the neighborhood of $5.,500 out the door for one, no matter what dealer I spoke with.

So, dropped back and re-thought my needs and desires. I'd had a TW years ago and, at that time, was not all that happy with it so, I sold it. But, my lifestyle has changed, my demands, and the application of this "Toy" was gonna be totally different this time. I know and realize the limitations of the TW (and it would be the same for the Vanvan).

And then there's the fact that the Vanvan is no longer being produced. The T-Dub's been hanging around for 30 years and, at least at present, there's no plans on eliminating it from Yamaha's lineup, that I know of. Now, that doesn't really mean too much to me. But, anyway, glad you're happy with it. I'm now starting to see some used ones on the market. Who knows, I might still end up with one. I like the fact that you're getting 80 mpg even in low gear on the trails/dirt roads. My dub drops to around 60 mpg from its normal 75-80 around town when I'm on the trails. Don't get me wrong, 60's not bad either. Thanks for the report. I'm an old *Norton" dude myself.
Scott
 

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Rotopax and a Clarke tank gets me some good range. With the crooked bolt issue I would not touch a Clarke tank for my TW until they go back to the good old days of just blemishes and need for right side plastic modification.

Rotopax is great, but their environmentally purposed spout makes me spill gas all over the place. Get the rotopax and also order the yellow spout for their water can.
 

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RotoPax are very sturdy and reliable, especially with the non-politically correct spout. I don't think I ever endangered the planet by spilling a drop, old fashioned spout works very well.

Bought mine used with a mount cantilevered off of rear of Cyclerack. Rough off-rod riding bent the mount as well s contributed to Cyclerack weld failures so I eventually went with a simple 2.3 gallon steel XT225 tank instead.

13 x 55 gearing coupled with a low pressure ATV tire reduces my mileage to an average of 50mpg so I really do not have much range beyond a stock TW. Still I'ld rather have fuel in the tank than additional fuel in a separate container for most rides.

When using any separate fuel can having a pair of nitrile gloves can avoid having gas smell on hands and gloves for remainder of the ride.

Swingarm city.jpg
 

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This might be a little overkill but on my TW (closest to the camera) I have the Rotopax and a Sweetcheeks liquid carrying contraption. The Rotopax is mounted on my rack with the Sweetcheeks straddled over the seat. I have a 32 oz. (I think) sized pop bottle filled with extra gas on one side and another same sized bottle filled with water on the other side. Rider 21 gave me the Sweetcheeks last year at Moab. I've put it to good and often use. Thanks Rider 21.
203232


They are both fairly universal but I can easily mount the Sweetcheeks on any of my motorcycles, even ones without a rack. Here is the Sweetcheeks on my XT350. I even use it on my XT200.
203233


I think the idea behind the Sweetcheeks are for bottles filled with water (not gas) and suppose to help you with your buttocks longevity in the saddle on long rides but I use mine differently and further back so I don't get the same buttocks relief as advertised.
203236


Some may say using a pop bottle for gas is dangerous. I agree but so is living. I've had many tip-overs and not had a problem of blowing up and losing my motorcycle is a big ball of flames.
Don't want to get hurt riding a motorcycle? Don't ride one then. I like living on the edge.
203237
203235
 

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Think Sweetcheeks water bottles lost or sold their domain name about a decade ago so finding one for purchase might be difficult. Person could always sew up their own.
sweetchecks.jpeg



Simply googling "SweetCheeks" might get you offers for something really painful involving hot wax. o_O Oooch!
SweetCheeks-is-located-at-2758-N-Campbell-Ave-in-Tucson-Arizona-About-2-miles-north-of-t_52988...jpg
 
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