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A dad and son were parked downtown where I was going into a store. I was looking over a vintage Royal Enfield. Looked brand new and I figured he put a lot of hours into the build. Looked beautiful for a 60's bike. They came out and we got to talking of course. The joke was on me. It was a 2010. A 500 single, who would have thought !!!!. I did notice it was right brake and left shift. I thought those english bikes were left brake and right shift. I rode a Triumph one time and about went into the ditch before getting my left foot to apply some pressure lol.
 

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Sort of like buying a new Corvair. Its an eye catcher at the very least. I found a set of tube frames for metal pannier cans, and the cans in a neighbor's parts pile and latched onto them thinking they were vintage. Probably not but when I found out how much they cost as an accessory now, I decided to treat them like gold. I've never installed them thinking I didn't want that much iron behind my ankles. Go figure.
 

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Royal Enfield's been made in India for many years.....since the 60's, I think.

https://royalenfield.com/usa/motorcycles/

They have had a reputation for poor reliability, but were crude enough, and simple enough for anyone to work on with basic hand tools.

More recent models have been improved.

Latest model is the Himalayan, an adventure style bike:

 

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I was in England in 1989 - Blew me away so suddenly see a brand new Enfield. Trick was the ones I knew in the 1960's were Royal Enfields and the one I saw and you saw was an Enfield India.
When Royal Enfield collapsed - the factory was moved to India
 

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The crazy world in which we live. My friend bought a Triumph recently and was shocked it was made in India. Seems like a well made
unit though and seemingly just as "odd" as the English made units, but no leaks or running troubles.
 

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The crazy world in which we live. My friend bought a Triumph recently and was shocked it was made in India. Seems like a well made
unit though and seemingly just as "odd" as the English made units, but no leaks or running troubles.
Pretty sure the new Triumphs are made in Thailand...

jb
 

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This video is great just substitue Yamaha TW for Royal Enfield and his discription is perfect for a TW. "Cooler than the underside of a pillow on a hot night", "Erotic yes", " roll on the throttle and you get there just as fast just a little louder" etc. Hahaha.
 

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Woohoo ! ! !

I've been trying for the past 6 months to take a photograph of this 1957 Royal Enfeld that has been restored to its original condition by the owner, well actually his mechanic did most of the work, so all credit goes to him.







 

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BMW has moved some operations from Munich to India as well this year. Similar to RE and Triumph. Right now it is limited to certain specific models. If the market accepts a German engineered motorcycle (and price) made there then I'm guessing they'll expand the operation there. For RE & Triumph the irony is they are probably built better than when they were made in England. At least in the final years for both companies when "cheapness" meant more profit. But loss of your core base RIP.
 

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For RE & Triumph the irony is they are probably built better than when they were made in England
Hurrumphhh

Never needed to change the oil on an old Triumph – it went in at the top, and straight out of the bottom. In many ways, they were great exponents of the “total loss oil system”, to the point where it became common practice that if a Triumph didn’t “mark its spot”, people would point and laugh

There was actually a cult in Japan that swore by old British iron in the 70’s, because of the way they handled the terrible Japanese roads back then – we may have “slightly underestimated” the crankcase tolerances, but at least we got the frame right

Times change, and countries adapt – these days, places like India need a bike where you can take off a foot peg and use it as a hammer (Enfield) – China and the Urals are doing the same thing

Unfortunately, India has twigged that by over-engineering the Triumph, they can export it once more to countries that “buy into the brand”, regardless of the physical weight

Still a couple of hundred weight of pig iron – but lacks the charm of the old days …….
 
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