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Discussion Starter #1
We’ve been using Ryobi One+ 18 volt cordless tools for years and we finally had our first battery failure (charger blinks red). Called the number on the battery and a new one is on the way.

I normally dread making warranty calls because many times it’s a PIA. That’s why I thought I’d share this positive story.

Living in Milwaukee, I really should be buying Milwaukee tools, but I inherited some Ryobi stuff and hate having batteries that can’t be used for all my tools. So we’ve stuck with them and this experience confirms my hope that they stand by their stuff.

We have their...

Weed trimmer
Impact drill
Standard drill
LED work light
Reciprocating saw
Jigsaw
Circular saw
Handheld vacuum

You have to keep your receipts as with anything. They let me just send them a picture of it while on the phone with them. Cheers
 

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Would they possibly let you upgrade? You have the 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.6, 4.0, 5.0, or 9.0 amp hour batteries?
Their already good stuff keeps getting better. Older NiCads always seemed to "dump" just about when the job is almost done, especially as they aged.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Would they possibly let you upgrade? You have the 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.6, 4.0, 5.0, or 9.0 amp hour batteries?
I should have asked, even though their warranty policy states “equal specs/value”. It was a 2.5 but we have a mixture of the others. We used a 5 to charge our phones and other electronics while off grid RVing the circle tour. Lasted the better part of a week with two college age daughters Snapchating and whatnot.

Good idea Fred. I need to consult with you before I do this kinda stuff
 

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I only have the good ideas after its too late. :p
While a dewalt lithium guy now I was staring at older Harbor Freight NiCad drill this morning and debating tossing it in garbage or giving to charity along with a pair of chargers and weak batteries. They were a waste of money.
While proprietary battery pack configurations are unfortunately the norm at least Roybi and others have some stuff that can be scaled up like the Roybi's One+ line.
 

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I hope you didn’t throw it away yet you may be able to revive. I had one that was 3 years old stop charging it was because of one low cell which the bus didn’t take care of, I open it and measures each cell with a volt meter and then zapped the low cell with a 9 volt battery like I saw on you tube. The battery is as good as new. It look complicated inside I originally thought I would switch out the bad cell but that would have too much work. Search reviving a lithium tool battery for the how to.

Because one cell was low the BMS cut out the charging to avoid unbalanced cells causing a problem. Each cell is supposed to be @3.7 v. I touch the bad cell @ 3 times very briefly with the nine v battery and that was enough to bring up the voltage so that the charger and bus would balance and charge it properly. Don’t worry the nine volt battery won’t make it explode or catch fire.
 

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BTW I have a lot of Ryobi tool I did a lot of handy man work with I really like them including the small air compressors that also fills high volume stuff.
 

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Good to know. I’m a firm believer in YouTube how-to vids, even though there’s some junk to filter out. I’ll report back if I’m able to save it. Thanks and cheers.
 

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Ryobi and Milwaukee are made in the same factory in Hong Kong, they're both owned by Techtronic Industries (which owns several other common electronics brands).

Not to say the design and performance is necessarily identical, but the overall "quality"- i.e how well they're assembled, the components that go into them- are extremely similar. I wouldn't rate Milwaukee as any more "heavy duty" than Ryobi. Both are in that sort of middle ground of "pro-sumer" tools. Definitely a step up from the Walmart brands, but not truly commercial grade like a Hilti or Makita.

If the battery packs crap out it's not terribly difficult to rebuilt them. There's a local auto electrics shop that started doing cordless tool battery rebuilds for a very reasonable price- most $20-$40. Virtually all tools use the common 18650 cells. Sometimes you can literally just yank them out and swap fresh ones in, but often they are spot welded in, so you need the right stuff to remove and reinstall new ones. Still, when most brands want $80-100 for a new pack- that contains about $10 worth of cells- it may be worth it if you have a lot of tools or go through a lot of batteries.
 
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