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Discussion Starter #1
I checked a few threads but they seem to discuss the bad threads in bolt receivers.
At my bike the receivers have come loose itself.

The seat is like new so i do not want to remove it
to see if i can somehow fasten them again.

anyone an easy solution?
 

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If it’s the piece I’m thinking of, I’ve never had that problem. Not sure how they’re affixed during production but I’m guessing it’s part of the molding process on the seat pan. My best suggestion is to utilize the two holes in the plastic on the sides of the bolt hole. You could try an adhesive in those holes that’s made for metal and plastic but if you remove your seat as often as I do it’s probably not gonna hold up. Another idea is to drill and tap and get small fasteners in those holes. Maybe someone else will have a better idea. If I recall, the receivers cannot be accessed from the inner side of the seat pan.
 

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Put some snaps in place of the fasteners and call it a day.
For a while (while I was manufacturing some "Mule nutz") I rode around with NOTHING holding my seat down and nothing happened....I guess this all depends on your riding style.
The OEM method is awful....most other models have hold-downs along the side of the frame, these are where all the mud goes!
I'm thinking something along these lines would work just as well...


Point is...there's gotta be a better way.
 

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Put some snaps in place of the fasteners and call it a day.
For a while (while I was manufacturing some "Mule nutz") I rode around with NOTHING holding my seat down and nothing happened....I guess this all depends on your riding style.
The OEM method is awful....most other models have hold-downs along the side of the frame, these are where all the mud goes!
I'm thinking something along these lines would work just as well...


Point is...there's gotta be a better way.
TW,
Those re-usable plastic type rivets that you linked are, as you more than likely know, used extensively in the automotive and motorcycle industries. Those things are all over my 2008 Honda GL 1800 Goldwing. I think that, with some sort of prep, they would work good for seat retainers. Those are not made to retain something that TRIES to pull itself apart. They're more made for just sort of holding something in place, such would be the case of the TW seat. But, you'd still get mud up in there and maybe if enough of that mud and or muddy water etc. got into the workings of those removable rivets, you might have an issue or releasing them when it came time to remove the seat either in the outback or, in your own garage. Not a bad thought though.
Scott

Now, on edit:
A potential plan for the OP here. Me being a basic MacGyver type, if I was having a loose seat threads problem, and up examination it was determined that those retaining threads could not be tightened up, here's what I might think about. If this would work, a BIG IF here, what I might design would be a flat plate, say, about 1/16th in. thick, x 1"x1" or, a tad larger, if there's room.
Then, drill 4 small holes in that plate, one in each corner. Then, drill a hole in the center, large enough that it would accept the original seat bolts. Now, on the back side of that plate, I'd weld a nut, with the same threads that the original retainers/seat bolts have. Then, I'd carefully drill out the loose, original seat retainer nuts. Then, mount that flat plate, with the welded nut stuck into the hole that was used for the original seat retainer threads.

Now, find some really small sheet metal screws, preferably counter sunk flat head ones and, drill a pilot hole in the seat bottom for those small screws. Mount that plate on the seat bottom, using the small sheet metal screws, DONE!

Now, without going out and taking my '07 seat off and examining it as to whether or not my described method of repair would work, this would be at least one approach. If you don't have a welder for tacking a nut on the flat plate, then a nutsert or riv-nut would also work.
Scott
 

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Maybe even a decent chunk of industrial-grade Velcro would also do the trick...I'm giving myself all kinds of ideas!



 

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This is what makes this forum so great. There are so many minds out there that are all thinking differently, and there are many solutions to usually choose from. Here is what I did. I got most of this idea a while back somewhere on this forum.
1 Under the seat the two nuts have a fairly wide washer style design. There are two 1/8” holes through the seat plastic on either side of the threaded center hole. (See photo) Use a 1/8” drill bit and drill through that hole into the base of the nut, and then use the back end of the drill bit as a pin to keep the nut from turning.
203597


2. Purchase two new 10mm bolts( I like stainless ) that have at least 1” shank after the threads stop. While holding the seat nut with the pin through the new hole in the nut, install the new bolt until it tightens up. measure up from the flat area of the seat surface 0.175” and mark a spot to drill a small hole through the bolt. Then measure up 1” to where you will cut off the head of the bolt and mark it there.
Remove the bolt, drill a hole that a key pin will fit, (approx 3/32”) and round the corners of the new pin hole. Then cut the bolt off at 1” and round the end off.
Reinstall the new bolt using the drill bit pin to keep the nut from spinning if needed. It helps if you mark the hole to be drilled in the new bolt so when it’s tightened it is pointing in the best direction to insert the key pin when you reinstall it on the bike.
203598

You can add a little loop of high strength cord or fishing line and attach it to the bolt location where the seat strap is if you like.
Total cost is just a few dollars, the seat is firmly attached, and it removes in seconds with no tools required. The short cord also makes it easier to pull the pin.
203599
 

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Was Original Poster really looking for an alternate seat retention technique?

From reading post #1:
"I checked a few threads but they seem to discuss the bad threads in bolt receivers.
At my bike the receivers have come loose itself.
The seat is like new so i do not want to remove it
to see if i can somehow fasten them again.
anyone an easy solution?"

I read that as stating that the owner's problem was loose female threaded inserts in the plastic seat pan coupled with a desire to not have to remove the seat yet wishes to know how to fasten "them" again.
If that is indeed the case then proposed solutions need to focus on restraining the female ithreaded nserts from rotation.
I can help with that. First need clarification from Original Poster TW125curacao.
 

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Fred, in response to your last post, The solution I posted would allow the seat to retain the rotating nuts as the seat would release with pins after the 1” posts were installed.
He would still have to drill or cut off the heads of the existing bolts to remove the seat.
I failed to mention that.
I’m curious as to your thoughts, ? how would you go about removing the seat?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
@Fred,

you are right. If i could stop the receivers from turning in the seat itself,
then the problem is basically fixed.
The bolts are not in the receivers but i expect the thread to be damaged
as i saw some wear on the thread.
Bought 2 new ones, tried to fit them and then i discovered the receivers twisting in the seat itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
@ TW in BC:

"For a while (while I was manufacturing some "Mule nutz") I rode around with NOTHING holding my seat down and nothing happened....I guess this all depends on your riding style.

Only when i do jumps then the seat comes a bit loose at the backseat ;-)
 

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One could drill into the seat pan at an angle intersecting the threaded inserts and pin the inserts so they can not rotate as Gastone pointed out.
 
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I purchased a used seat pan last summer for a Seat Concepts seat installation. I didn’t want to ruin the stock seat. The seat pan had seen some past abuse. The threads were rusted and one of the nuts had a broken off seat bolt still in the hole. I had to drill the rusted bolt out and then retap the threads on both nuts. They were a little sloppy after that, but since I use the attachment method I mentioned earlier I never have to remove them. If the threads are just a little messed up in your seat, it should be easy enough to clean them up with a thread tap.
 

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Another method would be to heat up the plastic with a heat gun and "shrink" it using pliers to tighten up the plastic. That way you keep the "factory" look and if needed you can use epoxy to fill the hole after you get the seat off.
 

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If the seat is off the bike and the bolts are out the female threaded parts are called T nuts. Sounds to me like they are spinning inside the molded plastic and I have had this issue before.
The attached photo is what basic T nuts look like. You will need to drill around the threaded part so you can get some epoxy injected in that will hold the base to the molded plastic. JB plastic weld or some other injectable epoxy will work.
Then you clean up the threads and do as member Gastone shows above after using the epoxy on the bolt threads to permanently affix a stud into the T nut.

203778

GaryL
 

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@ TW in BC:

"For a while (while I was manufacturing some "Mule nutz") I rode around with NOTHING holding my seat down and nothing happened....I guess this all depends on your riding style.

Only when i do jumps then the seat comes a bit loose at the backseat ;-)
Some industrial Velcro will solve that.
 
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