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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
setting up for winter riding

Well this is a first for me cause I have not done much long distance winter riding in my life, so it's been a learning experience to set me and my bike up, so far I have built shields on the front of my tw to deflect some of the wind and bought some new gloves and overalls...yea I still froze, so I ordered some grip warmers a baklava or whatever is called or spelled to keep my chin from freezing and a new helmet that I can shut the vents off. I think I will get some raingear also to help with the wind and see how that works. I was out yesterday and rode about 30 miles it was 35 degrees and froze my hands and chin,haven't got my stuff yet. I like riding my tw to much to let it sit all winter so I will keep trying to stay warm on the longer rides (thinking about spring is't helping) so far with my current stuff I can ride about 40 miles before it gets really uncomfortable below 40 degrees so hopefully my new stuff will get me further. 20131130_224151.jpg the shields are all home made I had a shorter one before it wasn't quite high enough so this one is about 4 in higher and keeps most of the wind off my chin but not all. So if anybody has any good ideas let me know.
 

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66, You are on the right track and are thinking about all of the right things. Using multiple layers of gloves helps compared to one big thick pair. I use lobster mittens, (fingers are in two pairs of two instead of one big clumsy mitten. Gaiters from your cross country ski kit sure help keep that wind from roaring up toward the crotch. I usually don't need a balaclava, but do use a chin scarf to seal that junction between my helmet and my jacket. Your handguards look great but hands will always be the coldest and most critical weakness (think clumsy equals unsafe). I believe the atv wind deflectors in front of your homemade ones (or my Moose Racing guards) help even more, but they do make mittens that fit on your bars and you stick your hands into them. I'll try to post the addon atv winter guards.

Here they are from the back. They did not interfere with controls and stayed in place, but did deflect even more wind from the hands.

I also find that carrying a totally different set of gloves helps because I can change from one setup to the others and get the benefit of added circulation in different places.
Ride safely and wave as you go by. Oh by the way, there is one other trick we practice in New Mexico - wait until 10:00 or so when the temp has risen 20 or so degrees from what it was at 0800. Cheers, Tom
 

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best thing you can do is stop the cold air from infiltrating to your skin. So as Peruano said, your on the right track. Have you thought about heated grips? I put them on my bike and will never go without them again. TIM
 

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Discussion Starter #4
heated grips are on the way, Thanx peruano never thought of the lobster gloves before, your advice is appreciated..steve.
 

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I like rideing my tw to much to let it sit all winter ......
The ATV muffs are great, but the best piece of winter riding gear I ever bought was a heated vest from Tourmaster: Tour Master Synergy 2.0 Heated Vest Liner With Collar - Motorcycle Superstore

Kinda pricey, but boy does keeping your core nice and toasty help with feet and hands. I usually never have to turn it up past one. You can either wire it direct to the battery (15 amp fuse included) or add a 12V receptacle which can be used for other stuff the rest of the year. The later TW's alternator will run a vest at least on #2 setting but not much more, so I chose this over heated gloves, which also have a bad habit of failing after not real long. My vest is fine after three years.

You DO have to remember that you are attached to the bike by a wire and unplug....ripping the controller off the bike doesn't do it much good! :(:p

I'll ride down to about 35 for several hours with a vest like this. And you are right, having a windproof outer layer makes a HUGE difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
hmmm don't think I can run a heated vest and grips on my 87, my core so far stays ok warm but my hands get real cold. I may run a aux battery so may need to see how long the grips alone will run on a charge, if they run 4-6 hrs that should work for my application and then not have to tax my 87s charging system, and if that works could run a heated vest to.
 

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My wife bought me a pair of Rukka winter gloves- they are pricey but they work great. They are somewhat like ski gloves with armor.
I use a mesh jacket for the armor and wear a parka over it. The mesh jacket is zipped to a pair of over pants with a liner.
I'm sweating when temps are in the 20's!
Oh and a bavaclavavavala or whatever it is.
I don't ride all winter just occasionally to satisfy the urge and to keep the bikes moving.
 

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Hippohands, heated grips, firstgear thermal suit, or Kilimanjaro and pants, mechanix gloves works for me even at 27" of snow and -17deg. F

and I use a double shield snowmobile helmit
 

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Ive used heated grips on several bikes, no longer bother.
Hippo Hands and a heated vest will keep your hands warm.
 

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I just installed a pair of symtec heated grips. Also running tusk deflex handguards and tusk $15 atv mitts. All i can say is i cant believe ive rode all thses years and froze my hands countless times. The first ride after putting on the grips it was 27 outside and i rode all day on low setting with vented leather road bike gloves on. I wouldnt buy bulky gloves. The heat from the grips wont get to your hands as well with thick gloves on. The scooter is getting heated grips next. The balkava makes a huge difference. I use raingear or something windproof the keep the cold air off of me. Im thinking a pair of the heated boot insoles may be really nice.
 

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cyclegear.com just came out with a new catalog that has plenty of heated gear, some on sale too!
 

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the heated grips help dry out wet gloves, take the chill out of your hands after doing things off the bike as well. The Hippo hands or similar products keep the heat in and the wind off your hands. Heated clothing ie vest, jackets, pants, under garments are great but they are not always with you even when you do not think you are going to need them. Living in Maine and riding year round commuting when 4 months and over 6,000 miles of my year are below 40 degrees you get a good feel of what is needed, my opinion (take it or leave it is an opinion). Of course above 40 degrees heated grips, and heavy clothing are not even used by guys riding up here.
 

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Keith, God bless you boy for riding in that cold weather. My old body wouldn't even begin to function in that weather, let alone be safe for myself and others. There is a reason they call San Luis Obispo "Gods Country".
Mel
 

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Ive noticed once your hands get cold so does the rest of your body. Keep the hands warm and it makes everything else feel ok. My feet were cold when i was out in the upper 20's but i felt good cause my hands were toasty. You know when you have to pee real bad and you have been holding it for along time. When you finally get to the restroom and that feeling you get in the first 10 seconds or so of going aaaahhhh-ahh. Thats what you feel like when your hands are all toasty on the heated grips when its real cold. It takes a few minutes for my grips to get really warm. So my hands start feeling a little cold then awww the grips start warming up.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
well I got my heated grips today and I will install them this week, to me 40 is still cold, I am hoping the grips will allow me to where less bulky gloves and have a better feel. I have never in my life had a bike with heated anything so I'm excited to see how they work. I decided to run a aux battery to run them and see how that works, don't want to put to much strain on my old 87 tw. I got my baklava today also, it seems like it will work good with my new helmet but will see. I hope to get all my ducks in a row so I can try this stuff out this weekend the weather looks cold and sunny high of only 35.
 
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Keith, God bless you boy for riding in that cold weather. My old body wouldn't even begin to function in that weather, let alone be safe for myself and others. There is a reason they call San Luis Obispo "Gods Country".
Mel
Mel
a good friend that rides with us for our Feb. winter camping trip is in his late 70's he rides up to Maine from Conn. than we ride to Alton Bay, NH for the camp out. it is the riding that will keep you young ride safe :)

you can see some of our exploits here VIDEO: Motorcycle camping in the blizzard | Bennett There Done That
 

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hmmm don't think I can run a heated vest and grips on my 87, my core so far stays ok warm but my hands get real cold. I may run a aux battery so may need to see how long the grips alone will run on a charge, if they run 4-6 hrs that should work for my application and then not have to tax my 87s charging system, and if that works could run a heated vest to.
Oops. You're right about an '87. Grips maybe or vest on #1, but not both. Somewhere in here is a number for the '87 output and draw from all the lights. IIRC there ain't much left. Hippo hands or equivalent plus the vest may work best. With my vest on #1 my hands don't get cold with good Winter gloves on. You may think your core is warm but it's not warm enough!!!;)

On the BMW, I will use both vest and grips, but I'm usually doing 75 or more. On the TW below 35 mph I don't need the heated grips. Keep in mind that even if your draw slightly exceeds the alternator output you can go about 2 -3 hours before you take a good fresh battery down too much. Some guys put a switch on the headlight to get 3-4 amps back, OK for back roads.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
20131203_184559.jpg 20131203_184652.jpg Well this will give you a idea of what I am doing, this is where I will install my aux batt. I think it should work and hopefully give me 4-6 hrs on my hand warmers, if I get lucky and it runs a lot longer I will think about a heated vest.
 

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You probably wont need your grips on anything more than low. You could put a switch on the headlight an gain 35w
 
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