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Discussion Starter #1
The fedex person brought me a shinko 241 from chapparal motorsports today. I was suprised the side walls were fairly soft and it spooned on fairly easy. Especially after sitting in the sun for a couple hours.
I havent had a chance to try the tire yet and I left it with 17 pounds air.
What psi do folks recommend. My riding is most likely gonna be 60% street and the rest on dirt roads that run from clay to gravel.
 

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Small world: Fedex left me a Shinko 241 today as well. I usually know his truck because of its squeaky brakes.

I haven't put it on yet, but have the same psi question. I'm over 250 Ibs, and have run the stock tires at the upper spec, 22/25 psi front/rear, on 90% pavement.
 

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Best to experiment and find out what tire air pressure feels best for you all for you're driving conditions. Usually, a lower psi in the tires will result in better handling for almost all off-pavement riding areas but the psi will vary. Some like me like around the 10 psi range. For street, we "pump it up" haha, to around 18 psi. If we ride a dual-sport ride (pavement/off-pavement) we're somewhere in between. Our preferences didn't happen overnight though. It took a few years of experimenting which is what I'm trying to suggest.

P.S. Right now I have a 241 on all of our TW's and the XT350 (though skinnier).
 

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I like my Shinko 241. When I installed it I also installed the Tubliss system


The little red tube seals the spokes and also locks the tire beads to the rim. This was all fairly new to me when I made a 120 mile round trip up to Roseburg. All asphalt, some freeway and it was a great trip.

I stopped in to Costco so I could drain my tire air and refill it with nitrogen. They use nitrogen because the it doesn't bleed out of the tires and tubes over time.

I retired from Costco and as the tire shop guy was filling my tires, we got to talking about how all that Costco stock in my 401K allowed me to retire with all those bucketsfull of money.

The front tire has 2 valve stems now. He put 110 psi in the little red Tubliss tube and then I distracted him, and myself, enough to go straight to the rear tire, skipping the other valve stem on the front tire.

I rode the 60 miles home with zero air pressure in the front tire and never noticed. I suppose the little red tube squeezes the beads to the rim and stabilizes it all.

I have never tried it again and I don't recommend it. Just commenting that the sidewalls seem fairly flexible on the Shinko, but they are not squirmy if the beads are seated.


PS... While I was at Costco, I spent the required $200. All that stuff, tied mostly on the rack, made the TW fairly tail heavy. That may have helped me not notice the airless front tire.
 

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I run 12 to 15 psi in the front Shinko 241. When I bother to check it. It doesn't squirm on the road even at 12. I don't ride highway or long distance at high speed. But I do lean on the twisty parts.

Not near as picky as I am with other bikes. I have TPS on the Dakar with converted tubeless rims.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for the information. I did get in a short five mile ride today and left it as it was at 17lbs.
Its quieter than the stocker and has more confidence inspiring cornering grip. Which may be all in my small brain.
Im gonna go easy for a few more miles to scuff up the new tread and be sure all the slick mold release is gone.
Im suprised its wider than I thought for a 4.00 tire. So far I is happy. Next week I will be able to put some more miles on it.
 

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Try 12 psi front & rear. You might be pleasantly surprised.
 

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Try 12 psi front & rear. You might be pleasantly surprised.
Dirt bikes commonly use these low tire pressures because they have rim locks to secure the tire to the wheel. Our bikes do not have rim locks installed so we rely on higher tire pressures to keep the tire from spinning on the rim. Be careful.
 

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Dirt bikes commonly use these low tire pressures because they have rim locks to secure the tire to the wheel. Our bikes do not have rim locks installed so we rely on higher tire pressures to keep the tire from spinning on the rim. Be careful.
As hard as it can be to break the bead on the OEM rear, I'm not worried.
 

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Golly gosh, and here I've been running air pressures for years as low as 4psi on my TWs but extremely rarely over 12 psi with never a spun tire or other issue. Squirrely for sure at 4 psi at anything over 5mph but it worked to get me out of a deep snowy canyon once.
Just completed some max speed canyon carving over a twisty 8300 ft Sierra mountain pass today at 10psi front & rear. if only I knew how wantonly dangerous I was without rim locks I would have slowed down below 50mph. :cool:
Of course your experiences may vary.
I did have my helmet mounted action camera come off at 40mph and slide down the pavement this morning but I collected the pieces...hope it works.(y)
 

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Dirt bikes commonly use these low tire pressures because they have rim locks to secure the tire to the wheel. Our bikes do not have rim locks installed so we rely on higher tire pressures to keep the tire from spinning on the rim. Be careful.
Dirt bikes have something TWs don't.

Horsepower.
 
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