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The subject came up recently, so I thought I'd comment on the "proper" way to gauge what length is needed (rather than by trial and error) in the interest of fewer ruined kickstands.



When you lower a bike 3" (as Rastaman has done for his wife, for example) you can't just automatically cut 3" from a kickstand to compensate or you'll overshorten it. Your bike will look drunk all the time and your kickstand will be more apt to simply punch a hole in the ground when the bike is parked on soft ground. Conversely, when you raise a bike 2" it will be so upright that a slight breeze will blow it over if you automatically add 2" to the kickstand.



As a kickstand goes "up" it also goes "in", causing the bike to lean exponentially for every inch shortened. The same applies in reverse when lengthening.



The proper way to gauge this when shortening one is to set both tires up on a section of 2x4, allowing the stock-length kickstand to rest on the floor. If you like the angle, cut 1 1/2" (the thickeness of a 2x4) off the kickstand. If not, add/subtract using 1/4", 1/2" or 3/4" lumber under the tires until you're satisfied with angle and cut only that amount from the stand.



When lengthening, leave the tires on the floor and shim underneath the foot of the kickstand until you like the angle. Then add only the shim thickness to its length.



In either case you'll probably find that a very little goes a long way here.



There are many ways to rejoin the metal once cut, and that's between you and your welder, but by far the strongest will be to keep the cuts and welds on the south (ground) end of the kickstand.



If you want to get really geeky about it or just don't have an eye for this stuff you could put an anglefinder on the side of the front downtube of a stock bike, measure the angle, then duplicate the lean angle of a stock bike exactly by the above methods before cutting/ lengthening anything.
 

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It's also a good time to add a larger foot. This will keep the stand from sinking into soft ground or hot pavement.
 

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The subject came up recently, so I thought I'd comment on the "proper" way to gauge what length is needed (rather than by trial and error) in the interest of fewer ruined kickstands.



When you lower a bike 3" (as Rastaman has done for his wife, for example) you can't just automatically cut 3" from a kickstand to compensate or you'll overshorten it. Your bike will look drunk all the time and your kickstand will be more apt to simply punch a hole in the ground when the bike is parked on soft ground. Conversely, when you raise a bike 2" it will be so upright that a slight breeze will blow it over if you automatically add 2" to the kickstand.



As a kickstand goes "up" it also goes "in", causing the bike to lean exponentially for every inch shortened. The same applies in reverse when lengthening



The proper way to gauge this when shortening one is to set both tires up on a section of 2x4, allowing the stock-length kickstand to rest on the floor. If you like the angle, cut 1 1/2" (the thickeness of a 2x4) off the kickstand. If not, add/subtract using 1/4", 1/2" or 3/4" lumber under the tires until you're satisfied with angle and cut only that amount from the stand.



When lengthening, leave the tires on the floor and shim underneath the foot of the kickstand until you like the angle. Then add only the shim thickness to its length.



In either case you'll probably find that a very little goes a long way here.



There are many ways to rejoin the metal once cut, and that's between you and your welder, but by far the strongest will be to keep the cuts and welds on the south (ground) end of the kickstand.



If you want to get really geeky about it or just don't have an eye for this stuff you could put an anglefinder on the side of the front downtube of a stock bike, measure the angle, then duplicate the lean angle of a stock bike exactly by the above methods before cutting/ lengthening anything.


Thanks to Lizrdbrth on the heads. As I was all ready to wack 3" off. I did the 2x4 trick and the bike is almost where it should be. I might get geeky and put the angle gauge (if I can find it) on it, just to be perfect. Thanks Lizrdbrth.
 
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