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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I don't know about you all but I'm sick of so many different motorcycles from all the manufacturers having all kinds of stupid mechanical issues. I mean come on, put a little more god damn money into R&D, charge an extra $1,500, and get it right the first time around.

I'm sick and tired of failing cam chain tensioners, clutches that start slipping on brand new bikes, oil and coolant leaks on low mile bikes, shitty valves with coatings that wear out in no time and cause major valve clearance issues, carbs jetted like shit from the factory (thank god for EFI...), things not being installed/bolted on securely from the factory (meaning at some random point they come loose and blow up the motor or trans), poorly cut third gears that wear out prematurely and blow up the trans, engine stalling due to cheap shoddy O2 sensors or crappy FI controllers etc, valve trains blowing up because the lock-nuts back out under continuous vibrations, and I can go on and on and on and freakin on. Unfortunately (for me) the majority of the motorcycling public places far more value on performance than durability, ease of maintenance, and trouble-free operation. Don't get me wrong. Performance is cool and all, and it damn well has it's place. In a race bike where engineers are always trying to push the margins to the thinnest imaginable to squeeze out that extra fraction of a horsepower to gain an edge, I can understand having all these annoying little technical issues. But vehicles that aren't marketed as high-performance racers shouldn't have all these problems. Sigh. This is the world I live in. Contrary to popular belief, I don't think anyone can ever REALLY change the world. It is what it is. Yea I know, I need to quit bitching like a spoiled brat and go fix my broken bike. Then figure out how to make more money so it won't be such a big deal. Good night. <END OF RANT>
 

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Feel better now? ;)
 

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K.J:
I bought an 08 KLR-650. Between the Dohickey,wire harness and crappy subframe bolts along with the decompressor lever issue I feel your pain. That said I've learned alot about fixing stuff on my own and am now
pretty happy with it.
 

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kj, take a look at the second generation Nighthawk 750s. Honda listened to buyers, and gave in to practicality: hydraulic lifters, easy oil filter and drain plug access, o-ring chain, even a dipstick to make oil checks easy. Zillions have 100,000+ miles on nothing but oil and filters, an occasional sprocket set and chain, and tires and tubes, plus replacement of worn out hand grips and seat covers. Worn out, mind you! If just riding is all you need, the last generation Nighthawks are a great choice. Just a basic motorcycle with enough power to get out of traffic, decent brakes and handling, and fairly standard ergos on a naked bike.
 

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kj, take a look at the second generation Nighthawk 750s. Honda listened to buyers, and gave in to practicality: hydraulic lifters, easy oil filter and drain plug access, o-ring chain, even a dipstick to make oil checks easy. Zillions have 100,000+ miles on nothing but oil and filters, an occasional sprocket set and chain, and tires and tubes, plus replacement of worn out hand grips and seat covers. Worn out, mind you! If just riding is all you need, the last generation Nighthawks are a great choice. Just a basic motorcycle with enough power to get out of traffic, decent brakes and handling, and fairly standard ergos on a naked bike.
The only problem I've had is getting the oil filter between the exhaust pipes. Wear a thick pair of gloves so you don't burn your hands!
 

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If you think bikes are crappy you should read about sleds... According to my sled site all sleds are junk.
My wife had a 1982 650 yammie that ran fantastic... It started to let her down last fall. "electrical" So our son-in-law wanted it because my wife upgraded to a yammie V-star...I'm hoping it's a good bike, other wise I'll be ranting.....OMM.
 

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I feel your pain KJ. You hit the nail on the head. Make it reliable, I really don't care how fast it goes.

But I get it with multiple bikes, some so old and/or rare that parts have to be made if they can't be found.

Some days I wish I had only my TW.

Even the new Harley has been back to the dealer twice. The last time from October to the first week in January.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
To be fair, my KLX certainly wasn't supposed to be a "just ride" type of bike. It was built to be a totally kick ass street legal dirt bike that would be just adequate on the street and reliable enough to go 25-30k miles without problems. Absolutely nailed it on one of those criteria, missed the mark by a country mile on the other... I do like that Nighthawk 750. A classmate from last semester had one (I think it was some other similar chassis but with the N750 motor dropped into it). I think it was early or mid 90's. Nice bikes for sure. Come to think of it, I saw it at a Taco Bell during break. And now I see it parked at school again this semester. Every time I walk by, I think it's a sweet lookin' little ride, and how I wouldn't mind owning it, lol. I know there ARE exceptions out there to that rule that every machine has at least one common problem, but from what I've seen, they are quite rare. Even the most durable usually have one or two little things that need to be addressed to get 50k+ miles out of them. I just wish there were more options to pick from for bikes that don't really have any issues and will do the long haul. If there were, I wouldn't mind the less reliable ones; they can still fill niche markets (i.e. street legal, hardcore extreme enduro bike = KTM EXC). The big irony with my KLX is that I avoided a few other bikes based on assumptions that they'd have problems that I didn't want to deal with... Maybe if I'd bought one of those I'd be out riding instead of complaining about how it's broken...or maybe it would be MORE broken. Who knows lol. But like Xracer said, you live and you learn.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Lol those horse-bike pictures are raging all over the internet these days. Best one I remember is one with some RMZ plastics strapped onto it's sides and such and a rope drooped around it's neck and attached to some MX bars - complete with full Motocross-geared rider. Giddeyup hossie, yee haw *que the hoof beat recording and Dukes of Hazard music* ;)
 

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The only problem I've had is getting the oil filter between the exhaust pipes. Wear a thick pair of gloves so you don't burn your hands!
I have a fan on the bench in front of the lift. By the time I get the plug undone the pipes won't burn you, and the oil is still plenty warm enough to drain well. Just be sure to block the air under the pipes or the fan will blow oil everywhere.
 

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I have a fan on the bench in front of the lift. By the time I get the plug undone the pipes won't burn you, and the oil is still plenty warm enough to drain well. Just be sure to block the air under the pipes or the fan will blow oil everywhere.
Good Idea. Thank You!! Knowing me I'll forget about blocking the air. But only once!
 

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There is no such thing as bullet proof where machinery is concerned. Back in the days there were a couple outstanding motors that came close in vehicles Chrysler slant 6 and a few from GM and Ford. None of our MCs are labeled as Timex that take a licking and keep on ticking. I do find the TW 200 motor a pretty durable power plant but they too have had their issues over the years. Mostly in poor designs of gaskets and other out sourced parts. Money seems to be a complete non issue and some of the most expensive motorcycles out there seem to have inherent mechanical issues that simply should not exist.

Being old and old school I hearken back to the days when cars and motorcycles were simple by design. All you needed was a timing light and some basic tools but progress along the way has changed all of that. Sensors, computers, electrical nightmares and the like have turned mechanics into high tech technicians. I remember when you changed the points, changed the plugs and filters, set the timing and away you went. My neighbor has a 1952 Chevy pickup with 12,000 original miles and only ever used right on his own property. Open the hood and there is enough room in the engine compartment to put another engine. We changed the points, plugs, filters and a new fuel pump last summer and it fired right up. Too bad it was never designed to run on the crap fuel we have to use today and it does not like it one bit.

The more you ask for in a machine the more problems you will have. Bells and whistles make for all sorts of additional systems dependent on the other systems. Keep it simple stupid seems to fit here and this is a good part of why I do like the TW.

GaryL
 

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I also miss those days...
 

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I don't. I've been retrofitting electronic ignitions to every vehicle with points I intended to keep since the early 1970s. I had my fill of solid lifters early on, and by 1970 there were hydraulics available that gave away nothing to solids on any reasonable street application. I installed deep or wide oil pans on most vehicles, along with a thermostat controlled oil cooler and a remote dual filter base. Doubled capacity meant doubled miles between changes. When Mobil 1 and Amzoil became available in the mid-70s I switched, and regularly ran 10,000 mile change intervals with modified conventional car and light truck engines. Less reason to be under the car when miles meant money. I've never had an oil related problem except with Castrol since BP bought them out.
 

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Amen Qwerty! The "good old days sucked" Used to be a real accomplishment to have a
car make it 100,000 miles and you'd better be a fair mechanic to get that far. Going a trip meant packing
tools. Cross country on a motorcycle? Best have a support vehicle. Modern engine management has
made vehicles much more efficient, dependable, less polluting and easier to work on. Simple is good, digital
fuel injection is far less complex than a carburator. Admittedly, modern stuff does require a different skill set and tools
than old stuff. Not even mentioning how much better modern motorcycles handle and brake compared to the olden ones.
I love old stuff but only as nostaglia, don't like fixing 'em or owning 'em.
 

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our little tw's last longer than any bike of old days. Started out with a 1972 Honda CL175, 17800 miles, smoking and using oil. then a 1975 Honda CL360, 33000 miles, losing compression, using oil, origionl chain, o ring chains are great. 2005 TW, 22000 miles, runs great.
 
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