TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Due to my ignorance of my TW's maint needs, the last time I rode my chain came off the sprocket. It was bouncy washboards going uphill and that is when it happened. Also I did not have a tool roll other than the stock bits. Keep in mind, dear reader, I am a new rider at 44 yrs. with a TW I have that was my Dad's fishing buddy bike. It sat for years in storage rusted tank and so forth. I have fixed the TW with a tank chem process and coating (sent it off locally) and refitted the carb with innards (it was gummed up and I dissolved some sensitive parts with carb dip overkill but did fix that myself).
Back to the narrative, I worked the chain back on with some roadside help, turned around to carefully head home. Rode downhill a bit more, chain was soon off again, coasted a bit and the chain caught up for the final stroke and I skidded to the stop.
When you're in Idaho perhaps you should expect a nice couple to stop - who were from LA and just out in their Prius with their lapdog - to stop and offer you a ride. But I did NOT see that coming.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
1989 TW stock chain (wrinkled and ruined a bit), my Dad changed a sprocket to have a lower gear for climbing to fishing lakes, or descending, Zilch that I am I don't know if it was front or rear sprocket that he changed. The outcome was a lower first gear for those situations I don't know which would have that effect


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I would like to order some parts from ProCycle to get the bike ridin dirty again. I would like advice for being more aware of my motorcycle's maintenance needs. I do understand that I flopped on the maint of the chain tension and caused my own problem.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Change sprockets and chain together, that's the safe side of doing this maintenance so I am cool with that as the sprocket isn't expensive. I think I want an X or O ring chain (though at my low miles level of riding a stock chain would do me for the next 2000 miles as I learn some riding technique).
Also I had in mind the dress up kit which would serve to transition from the JAV screws to allens - and I can see the benefit there. I don't want to fuzz with stripping engine cover screws or any of the others.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I know there are great resources for this info in Idaho - practically in spitting distance from my new Shinko 244 ...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,239 Posts
Wonder how many would catch this. Very creative!:D



If you ever want a helping hand (I have hammers) let me know. Except for weekends from March through the end of October. I'm usually gone riding. And holidays which again, I'm usually gone riding.:p But between those times I can help, and I mean that. Need help, let me know. ;)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,732 Posts
We all learn by our mistakes (or someone elses) – welcome to the club ……

First up – I’d start with giving that bike the once over – that’s a ’91 with under 2k on the clock if I’m not mistaken. That makes it nearly 25 years old. Take one area at a time and it’s not that bad to deal with. A good place to start would be to download the manuals, and take a look at the service intervals and what should be done. http://tw200forum.com/forum/technical-write-ups/70-service-repair-manuals.html

I’m not sure there will be a “25 year” list for maintenance, but you’ll know what the bike needs, and the manuals will show you how to do it. For various tasks there’s more information on specifics jobs in the “stickies”, which are here - Technical Write-Ups - these “stickies” contain more pics and information than the manual, and often cover a lot more besides. Anything you’re still struggling with, ask for help and it will be given freely.

The first thing you need to address is the chain and sprockets. While you’ll definitely need a new chain, you may (at 2k miles) not need sprockets. There’s only one way to tell, and that’s by sight – post up a nice full size picture of your rear sprocket please – we’ll be looking at the condition of the teeth (not counting them yet).

As for the number of teeth on the rear sprocket, now would be a good time to count them – if the gearing has been changed on this bike by altering the number of teeth on the sprockets, we should be able to tell from the tooth count.

“O” or “X” ring chains are good, but come in various lengths – let’s work out what size sprockets you have on there first (which may affect the chain length).

While all that is going on (and we’re arguing among ourselves over teeth like a Dentist’s convention) – look at changing the oil and doing your valve clearances. Everything you need to know is in the manual and the “stickies” – re-use the old filter (which on that year should be designed to be re-used) and all it will cost you is a quart of oil. Make sure you use the right oil (10w 40) and look closely to see that it’s meant for use with a wet multi-plate clutch. If it has a picture of a motor cycle on the bottle, you’re good to go. I’d recommend old fashioned dino oil at this point, synthetic can come with its own problems on a bike of this age.

Sounds like a right pain in the butt – but it’s only three things – chain and sprockets – oil change – and valve clearance. The three things most important to the bike.

I’m guessing this bike has some sentimental value to you – so let’s get her done right …….

(Welcome to the board) .........
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,732 Posts
Purple, I would have added a "like" to your post, but you got the year wrong. Zilch stated it is a 1989 bike, not a 1991 :p
Nope - he said the chain was '89 - not the bike (I checked the colour scheme on the "colour by year" thread) :p

The sprockets may not be knackered, which may yet save a lot of aggravation - wait and see ..............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
Just one VERY important thing, there is not an automatic cam chain tensioner on that bike, you have to check it and adjust it MANUALLY and then remember to check every 4000 miles, go to Chapter 3 Page 5 of the Service and Repair Manual to see how to do it. My 1990 model's cam chain was completely slack and after I adjusted it my bike is running a lot better, more power and starts more easy.;)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,732 Posts
Yo, English Crumpet....he said "1989 TW stock chain". Now, in Great Britain, that must mean that he owns a 1991 bike, and he went out and bought a chain that was 2 years older than the bike, and put the 1989 chain on his 1991 bike. :(
It's possible .........

whistling_smiley_by_broni123.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I suppose a comma would have forestalled the confusion. I also will check the date of the bike. My Dad has always referred to it as an '89 and it was registered first in 1990. I've always wondered if the registration was wrong.
I don't know what year the chain is :)

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,516 Posts
When in ANY doubt, please ask this forum questions. Yes ,at times it may take a few hours before someone answers. It's not winter so folks are probably outside.Take your time. Try to have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Hi, thanks for all the help - I am considering all suggestions, appreciate the step-by-step details, and I was hoping to drag Admiral in to this....err, I mean I wanted to use the wealth of knowledge and experience from the board.
I love this forum! So many great people and adventures to check out. One of my favorite things to pass the time is to log on and read about apples and suspenders.

All right a check on the vin puts the bike squarely in 1990. I don't think I will bother Dad with that detail. From now on I'll remember it's a 1990 (with a 1989 chain).
I have been a member for a couple years, for the first year I had the bike apart a bit to work in the tank, petcock, and carburetor Once I put that all together - it actually ran! But I did have a hard time starting it and figured it was a good idea to have it checked over by a professional mechanic It turned out I was trying to start the bike with the throttle open (remember, dear reader, I have limited experience with zen and motorcycle mechanics). But he did check it over and I did provide oil, a filter (4holes) and I had a new battery for the bike. So really I had the bike running & starting fine! But he checked it over (no problems starting it or running it) so that's peace of mind there if nothing else. He said mostly he used it to show his kids how to do wheelies. But, he's a friend, so you know, he's in jail now.
So next was insurance and gathering safety gear (aspiring ATGATT) and my learners permit The next year's riding was my 15 minute commute to work and some town rides to get practiced and experienced. I will take a STAR course (cuz I like livin) but I succumbed to many an excuse to not to.
Back in again on the narrative, I took the bike up on the last day before my learners permit expired and that is when I balled up the chain and ended up with a nice ride in a Prius.
I think my new plan is to go back to stock, will count sprocket teeth in a moment here, but stock chain and both stock sprockets and that way I can use the master link from my old chain as a spare. I can hang on to the current sprockets as spares or to use if I think changing gearing would be advantageous.
I have under 2000 miles on the odometer so while I had poked a bit on the chain to test deflection, I was not expecting the chain stretch to be an issue I had to tackle quite yet.
Fortunately the bike is in almost new condition as it was stored pretty well over the years. Aside from the fuel in the tank not being addressed, everything is un-knackered.
So what is the opinion on the Allen head replacement hardware - since I'll be going in to do some work here should I replace the JAV hardware?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,210 Posts
See Zilch, you figured out stock 50 teeth. You are well on your way to becoming a master motorcycle mechanic:p
I imagine you could simply clean, lube and properly adjust your chain (ride a bit to straighten any kinked links , then retighten/adjust) and get many more miles from your chain. Chain links are basically one inch , you could measure stretch. However since sprocket looks reasonable stretch is likely acceptable too. De-railment was likely simply lack of adjustment, not intrinsic chain malfunction.
This would allow you to move on to perhaps a greater need. How old are those tires?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #18

Front tire from last summer. Rear is OG.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Fred if 50 is the stock rear am I needing to go looking at the front sprocket to count teeth & see if it is the one my Dad changed?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,210 Posts
+1 on the Golden Boy.
Like your Idaho chain avatar.
I'm no expert but while my '03 came with 50 tooth stock I know some other years had a 47 tooth as stock. So perhaps I mis-spoke about stock sprocket for your machine and this is what your father changed to generate a little more off-road grunt. Usually a 14 tooth is in the front. I have a 13 tooth which would make a 14/13ths , or ~7.7% under drive, fairly significant were it not offset by my taller rear tire.
Should you want to access front sprocket following Twilight's advice might seem tedious but this comes from a guy who's used to keeping nuclear power plants glowing a nice shade of blue. . Nation-s-oldest-UM-ready-to-dump-campus-reactor.jpg
No meltdowns for your TW, right?
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top