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Discussion Starter #1
I’m using 1/4 wire to play with a simple design for a sissy bar on the TW. I’m going to weld tubing the same size as the rack onto the rack. Obviously not going to use it for a backrest but definitely to tie bags to bc I travel long distances often.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
While I was waiting for the sissy bar to be bent I made a tool bag for her.
 

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I personally would probably remove the exta seat on your rack and use straps or bungies as needed to secure extras.

I say that as I would personally be afraid I would possibly get tangled up and possibly hurt pretty badly at my age with something like that possibly preventing me for getting "cleanly" off of and away from my bike in the event of the unexpected.

But that's simply my first impression... but possibly you have engineered something in that I don't see or understand ?

excalibur
 

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If you plan to tie anything that high I suggest it be the lightest weight items as it will affect your center of gravity. I also agree that anything that can injure you in an accident is worth some apprehension. It looks thin enough that I'd also be concerned it may bounce and flex hitting your wife from behind. Personally I think your wife wearing a backpack is a better idea.
 

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the tail end of the TW is the weak point of the bike. any leverage you apply by hanging bags over the back end, will cause sub frame damage. quite a few posts on "thee old sub frame" problems. i think you might all ready be testing the sub frame by having the rear seat and your passenger's weight on it. according to yamaha, the rear sub frame is only rated for 7 lbs
 

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There’s some debate over just what constitutes the “sub frame” – if you suggest that it can only take 7lbs, then you better have a pretty light pillion

If you concentrate the weight loading on the pillion seat position, you should be good for 150 lbs or so – if you take it to the edge (the apparent luggage space platform), then yes, the 7lb rule applies

The issue here is that that the pillion position is over what is arguably the “main frame”, while the seat seems to attach to something considerably more flimsy – but once attached, the seat transfers the weight onto the main frame, and is only held in place via the “sub frame” – vertical forces

The confusion seems to stem from where most racks attach to, which is the cross member, which rather encourages such behaviour by having several holes attracting additional bolts. This cross member is only there to hold the seat in place, and to make sure the seat doesn’t fall off, and thus makes sure the vertical forces on the seat go onto the outside “tubes”

The outside tubes can take the weight of a person (vertically) – the inner cross members are a token gesture to hold the seat in position – and ignoring this simple engineering fact is what gets most people into trouble

I would suggest to the OP that by securing the sissy bar to the outside round bar with a system of clamps could be more sensible, but the leverage of a sissy bar may yet prove “problematic” ….
 

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I see in your signature that you also have a very nice, newer model Harley Davidson.. :icon_thumleft:

I have one also. a 2017 Softail slim with the 110 C.I. :rolleyes:

I think H/D's in particular, can be made to look good if the owner prefers, the addion of a sissy bar on the back for passsanger safety and riding comfort, while carrying a bit of cargo if need be behind the sissy bar in the old Captain America fashion. ( even though on FLSS I ride, I still prefer doing it solo with simply a set of throw over leather bags tied to a small fender rack. ). :D

I doubt that I would ever go that " sissy bar" route on my TW for a couple reasons, The first would be safety, and I kind of take pride in having my TW look like what it is... which IMO, is a "safe", rather underpowered, and fairly well designed bike to explore the backroads and trails on..

I have a 900 cc Triumph America, which I have set up as a distance "road bike", with a short back rest, luggage rack, highway pegs, crash bar, saddlebags, windshield, and seat designed for safe two up riding, as my "pavement bike". I can include camping gear if prefered, and a passanger on the back of that bike when I while enjoying that type of a ride. ( Which IMO, my TW can't safely do 2 up. :(

Perhaps a larger Dual Sport model may be able to pull that off safely though should you prefer a somewhat larger model for the" two up " riding with your gear ?

Just $.02 from an old guy who is probaby once again way out in "Right Field" with my thoughts and notions:rolleyes:

Gene aka:excalibur
 

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There’s some debate over just what constitutes the “sub frame” — if you suggest that it can only take 7lbs, then you better have a pretty light pillion

If you concentrate the weight loading on the pillion seat position, you should be good for 150 lbs or so — if you take it to the edge (the apparent luggage space platform), then yes, the 7lb rule applies

The issue here is that that the pillion position is over what is arguably the “main frame”, while the seat seems to attach to something considerably more flimsy — but once attached, the seat transfers the weight onto the main frame, and is only held in place via the “sub frame” — vertical forces

The confusion seems to stem from where most racks attach to, which is the cross member, which rather encourages such behaviour by having several holes attracting additional bolts. This cross member is only there to hold the seat in place, and to make sure the seat doesn’t fall off, and thus makes sure the vertical forces on the seat go onto the outside “tubes”

The outside tubes can take the weight of a person (vertically) — the inner cross members are a token gesture to hold the seat in position — and ignoring this simple engineering fact is what gets most people into trouble

I would suggest to the OP that by securing the sissy bar to the outside round bar with a system of clamps could be more sensible, but the leverage of a sissy bar may yet prove “problematic” ….
well Purple, if you were to look at the picture of his bike you would see the extra passenger seat is way back and 1/2 sitting on the sub frame and in the picture you can see the rack is basicaly supported on the turn signal brackets, meaning there is going to be way more than 7 pounds on the spot that is only designed for.... nothing

and there is no debate on what is the sub frame....it is the flimsy piece of crap that yamaha scabbed on to the rear of the frame.....it is the piece that we all have been having problems with anytime you carry any more than a 6 pack on it
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The seat is half on the rack but only to attach it to something. My wife sits on the front part of the eat which is over the original seat. We have ridden 4500 miles together with no problem. The sissy bar is attached with pipe clamps for easy removal when I ride off road. I wouldn’t ride it off ride with the sissy bar on for reasons that others have mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you plan to tie anything that high I suggest it be the lightest weight items as it will affect your center of gravity. I also agree that anything that can injure you in an accident is worth some apprehension. It looks thin enough that I'd also be concerned it may bounce and flex hitting your wife from behind. Personally I think your wife wearing a backpack is a better idea.



What you see in the picture is just a model to see what it would look like. I’m using 1/2 solid rebar.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I see in your signature that you also have a very nice, newer model Harley Davidson.. :icon_thumleft:

I have one also. a 2017 Softail slim with the 110 C.I. :rolleyes:

I think H/D's in particular, can be made to look good if the owner prefers, the addion of a sissy bar on the back for passsanger safety and riding comfort, while carrying a bit of cargo if need be behind the sissy bar in the old Captain America fashion. ( even though on FLSS I ride, I still prefer doing it solo with simply a set of throw over leather bags tied to a small fender rack. ). :D

I douby I would ever go that " sissy bar" route on my TW for a couple reasons, The first would be safety, and I kind of take pride in having my TW look like what it is... which IMO, is a "safe", rather underpowered, and fairly well designed bike to explore the backroads and trails on..

I have a 900 cc Triumph America, which I have set up as a distance "road bike", with a short back rest, luggage rack, highway pegs, crash bar, saddlebags, windshield, and seat designed for safe two up riding, as my "pavement bike". I can include camping gear if prefered, and a passanger on the back on that bike when I intended to do such while enjoying that type of ride. ( Which IMO, my TW can't safely do 2 up. :(

Perhaps a larger Dual Sport model may be able to pull thatoff safely though should you prefer a somewaht larger model for the" two up " riding with your gear ?

Just $.02 from an old guy who is probaby once again way out in "Right Field" with my thoughts and notions:rolleyes:

Gene aka:excalibur

Thanks for sharing your opinion. Soft tail slim very nice. I live in Nicaragua as a missionary all year except for 6 weeks every year or two. My HD is in Virginia where I was born and raised. That’s why I’m using my TW like a HD even though it’s not made for that. The sissy bar is removable so when going off road and maybe getting myself in a bail situation it won’t be in the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Here is the finished product. You can see how it’s attached. It extends all the way to the end of the rack. It is very solid and I like the way it looks. I know it’s different but any TW rider definitely is different.
 

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I'm still not sure if it's good idea but it looks much better.

But bringing your bike into your living room is GREAT idea. Great place to park but no wheelies. I've seen that go bad before.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It’s working great. Lots of compliments, the pictures make it look weird to me too.
I didn’t want her to get cold last night (67* cold for us) so I brought her in. One of my daughters asked if she could sleep with the motorcycle. Lol
 
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