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Does anyone reccomend using Slime in the tubes on the TW?





Cigardog
 

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I hate slime. It makes it so if you get a flat, you can't patch the tube, and it rarely works on anything but a tiny pinhole. I would rather carry one of those split tubes with me. Another trick is to put two tubes in and leave the innermost tube flat. Then, when you get a hole in the first tube, you air up the second one and ride home. It makes your wheels heavier, but if you're dealing with getting alot of flats, it's worth it.
 

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I'll take the middle road on the argument. On a long and remote trip, I'll carry slime and put it in the tire if I get a flat and then air hoping that it will stop the leak or slow it down enough to let me limp back to civilization. I use slime in my bicycle tires and it eventually hardens up, clogs the valve stems, and needs to be thrown away with the tube. I suspect it would do the same thing to an MC tube and I don't want anything too off center - out of round - or gummy in my tube that might cause a failure beyond a normal puncture flat. Maybe someone will wax about the merits of rideon (made for motorcycles and placed in the tube before the flat). I would consider that stuff before inserting Slime in a nonroadside emergency situation. JMHO. Tom
 

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Slime? No way. RideOn? Only if willing to inspect tires on a regular basis. RideOn will seal a flat, and a foreign object shoved around in the hole only tears up the tube worse, possibly to the point the RideOn will no longer seal the hole.



I went on a dualsport ride with about 125 bikes. Half took advantage of free RideOn. 6 flats that weekend, not a one on a bike with RideOn. One bike developed a leak in a tubeless tire, the rider then installed RideOn, and the rider went ahead and wore the tire out over time with no other repair.



RideOn is water based and can be rinsed off so a punctured tube can be patched, but there is a good chance that a tube that RideOn won't plug is also too far gone to be patched.



I've not had a flat since I began using RideOn, and I've pulled several objects out of my tires over the years.
 

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Slime? No way. RideOn? Only if willing to inspect tires on a regular basis. RideOn will seal a flat, and a foreign object shoved around in the hole only tears up the tube worse, possibly to the point the RideOn will no longer seal the hole.



I went on a dualsport ride with about 125 bikes. Half took advantage of free RideOn. 6 flats that weekend, not a one on a bike with RideOn. One bike developed a leak in a tubeless tire, the rider then installed RideOn, and the rider went ahead and wore the tire out over time with no other repair.



RideOn is water based and can be rinsed off so a punctured tube can be patched, but there is a good chance that a tube that RideOn won't plug is also too far gone to be patched.



I've not had a flat since I began using RideOn, and I've pulled several objects out of my tires over the years.
Yeah I have heard that ride-on is better but where is a good source for it? I have been unable to find it locally.
 

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What I really wonder is how you guy's with the giant atv tires break the bead trailside to fix a flat let alone get the tire back on the bead with a hand pump or co2 filler out in the wilderness ?



I have slime in my tires now, if I had known about RideOn last year I would have put it in instead.
 

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What I really wonder is how you guy's with the giant atv tires break the bead trailside to fix...
Hi Rich,



I have read every ATV tire thread I could find, and researched ATV tires in general. I have a spare rim and am going to give one a try.



From what I have read, ATV tires (on ATV's) are run at 7-12 psi. And with the extremely tight fit on the TW rim, I think you could ride on the flat tire and it wouldn't come off the rim.



Lizrdbrth seems to have the experience to answer your question.



jb
 

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I have the Duro on the rear and Maxxis 6006 front. I have Slime in both tires and also carry the Slime air compressor / bottle of Slime with me.



Honestly the Duro is on the rim so tight that there is no way I'd want to attempt getting the tire off while on the road. I run at about 8-10 psi on the trail and I think the tire would even hold up for a bit completely airless! So, I carry the compressor and Slime in the event I do have a flat.



I use the air compressor frequently and always check it before going on a ride as I do air up to 15-18 on the road and air down on the trail.



BTW, the Maxxis 6006 is also so stiff walled that I think one could ride out flat on it...
 

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I am getting ready for 1000 or so miles on the TAT. Last fall I did 300 or so miles of the trail and ended up with several thorns in my front tire. luckly It didn't go flat until I got home. I will give the ride on stuff a try.
 

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I am getting ready for 1000 or so miles on the TAT. Last fall I did 300 or so miles of the trail and ended up with several thorns in my front tire. luckly It didn't go flat until I got home. I will give the ride on stuff a try.


Slime works great. Two years I made a 4000 mile trip through Venezuela, Brasil, Guyana en Suriname and picked up a lot of thornes, nails etc.

Changed the rear tire recently and found about 35-40 punctures in the tube. The tire never lost its pressure in all these two years.

Use lots of it and make a ride right after you fill the tire.



Hans
 

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The last time I checked the Material Data Sheet for Slime it showed that it can corrode aluminum and peel paint with extended exposure.



Ride-On TPS is a more commercial version version of the product. While Slime boasts that ambulances and police for the Baja are running Slime, the competitors are mostly using Ride-On.



Entire fleets of trucking companies use Ride-On, as do many state police in all their vehicles. We did the Continental Divide Trail a few years ago. My wife and I and one friend had TPS in our tubes. The 4th person on the trip did not. We changed three flats on that trip, all on his bike. I pulled a 2 inch finishing nail out of my tire and kept going. By the time I got home my Kenda K270 had 4500 miles on it and still had tread.



My wife rode the CD Trail on a DRZ400, which we bought from a customer after he rode the Trans America Trail with it. He did the whole thing from Jellico, TN to Oregon with Ride-On in his tubes and not once had a flat. When he got back I pulled the tubes and slit them open to see what I would find and I found a couple of cactus needles.





If you can't find Ride-On TPS locally we carry it at my shop so just PM me.
 
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