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Discussion Starter #1
While attempting to measure and figure out whether or not I need to adjust the chain I noticed that there are several notches/detente in between numbers on the snail adjusters. How does one know how many notches are needed to properly adjust a chain? Thank you for the help.
 

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Just make sure it's not any more than 2 and 37 thousandths of an inch. :D
Actually a 6 cm limit is good enough resolution, don't think Yamaha engineers were thinking of 61mm or 60.1 mm as being the precise limits of unacceptability. Unit conversion can be fraught with significant digit mis-representation.
Thank goodness the US Congress passed the Metric Conversion Act in 1976 creating the US Metric Board and their never ending annual budgets as they continue their never ending struggle to implement the mandated unit change on a resisting public. Too bad "Resist" is so popular with Metric as well as other trends.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just make sure it's not any more than 2 and 37 thousandths of an inch. :D
Actually a 6 cm limit is good enough resolution, don't think Yamaha engineers were thinking of 61mm or 60.1 mm as being the precise limits of unacceptability. Unit conversion can be fraught with significant digit mis-representation.
Thank goodness the US Congress passed the Metric Conversion Act in 1976 creating the US Metric Board and their never ending annual budgets as they continue their never ending struggle to implement the mandated unit change on a resisting public. Too bad "Resist" is so popular with Metric as well as other trends.
Haha thank you Fred. Being from Europe the metric system is ingrained, it’s the other “ system “ I’m having trouble with, still after several decades:rolleyes: Anyway, I won’t stress over the chain, I’m a “light user”, I do not beat anything up, I’ve got 300 miles on this thing, I’ll wait til 600 and let the dealer handle it. Thanks Fred, you and all the other “usual suspects” are an endless source of useful info. Great to b on this forum, thanks again.
 

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A chain adjustment should not be a dealer job. There are even you tube videos on it that are TW specific. There is a teenage kid who does a great job and has fun while doing it. How much adjustment...enough to get the right slack. If you have stretched chain or neglected the adjustment, the chain will need more adjustment. Look at the amount of sag...that lets you know your chain needs adjusting. Just keep the marks on the snail even. Then people say that the factory chains are junk and the sprockets don't last. Every act of neglect leads to a more expensive part getting prematurely worn. These are TW's for crying out loud. Put down the purse and pick up some tools. You can't break one of these. My mechanical skills are a hate crime in some jurisdictions. I can't remember if there is a pin to pull (most times it is a crown nut with a pin), Crack nut loose, bang with a rubber mallet if you can't pull by hand, leave around two inches or so of play, and tighten her up. The you tube video even has the slack spec and the torque spec. Tools-ratchet, bit, rubber hammer, needle nose (I think), tape measure, and torque wrench if you really want to show you care. Otherwise torque it mentally to tight, but not too tight. The owner's manual has the specs. A bike jack is about thirty dollars on Amazon and it does make the job easier. (replace the cotter pin).
 

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Wait... my book says 1.2 -1.6 inches.

Edit: i watched tdub kids video and I see there is a discrepancy between manuals.

Mine was about 2" and 1 notch put it right at the minimum. Guess it'll be awhile before I need to do it again lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A chain adjustment should not be a dealer job. There are even you tube videos on it that are TW specific. There is a teenage kid who does a great job and has fun while doing it. How much adjustment...enough to get the right slack. If you have stretched chain or neglected the adjustment, the chain will need more adjustment. Look at the amount of sag...that lets you know your chain needs adjusting. Just keep the marks on the snail even. Then people say that the factory chains are junk and the sprockets don't last. Every act of neglect leads to a more expensive part getting prematurely worn. These are TW's for crying out loud. Put down the purse and pick up some tools. You can't break one of these. My mechanical skills are a hate crime in some jurisdictions. I can't remember if there is a pin to pull (most times it is a crown nut with a pin), Crack nut loose, bang with a rubber mallet if you can't pull by hand, leave an two inches or so of play, and tighten her up. The you tube video even has the slack spec and the torque spec. Tools-ratchet, bit, rubber hammer, needle nose (I think), tape measure, and torque wrench if you really want to show you care. Otherwise torque it mentally to tight, but not too tight. The owner's manual has the specs. A bike jack is about thirty dollars on Amazon and it does make the job easier. (replace the cotter pin).
Thank you Michael, you are correct on all of it and I do appreciate your input. But....how do you know I have a purse? :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Doesn't matter...just get out those tools and tear into the bike. Embrace every opportunity to take this thing apart just to see how it goes back together. You will not hurt anything. Most of all, enjoy yourself.
Thank you Michael. I will be "tearing" tomorrow. If I get any leftover parts I'll ask for your help.:)
 

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Set the chain slack while someone is sitting on you TW and don't worry about how loose it seems when no one is sitting on it. As the rear suspension compresses the chain tension tightens. Measure the tension or slack when the rear suspension is compressed and it will be correct everywhere else.

A little bit loose is much better than a little bit to tight. And if its not an o-ring chain clean and oil it every 300 to 400 miles. Kerosene to clean and 140wt gear oil to lube.
 

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Does the 140wt fling off the chain? Somewhere I have an old riding jacket with a nice permanent chain lube stripe up the back from enduro bikes with no chain guard.
 
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Does the 140wt fling off the chain? Somewhere I have an old riding jacket with a nice permanent chain lube stripe up the back from enduro bikes with no chain guard.
Yes but only in the beginning and no where near as bad as lighter oils. The chain guard takes care of it.

After wiping the chain off and installing it I ride up to the parking lot at the corner of Hwy 9 and Skyline. There I take some paper towels and wipe under the back part of the chain guard and under the engine and I half ass wipe down the chain for a second time. After that I am done for the next 300 to 400 miles.
 

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Set the chain slack while someone is sitting on you TW and don't worry about how loose it seems when no one is sitting on it. As the rear suspension compresses the chain tension tightens. Measure the tension or slack when the rear suspension is compressed and it will be correct everywhere else.

A little bit loose is much better than a little bit to tight. And if its not an o-ring chain clean and oil it every 300 to 400 miles. Kerosene to clean and 140wt gear oil to lube.
Correctimundo!

And here's a good "upgrade" to the procedure:
After you measure & adjust to get the slack just where you want it, have your "test dummy" get off the bike. (Do not move the bike or rear wheel forward or back.
Then pick a point, ~mid-point along the top of the swing arm. Mark this point with a Magic Marker, piece of tape or something similar. Ideally, this will be a permanent mark for future use. A small scribe or punch mark in the paint is perfect.
Using your finger or thumb, lift up on the top run of the chain until all the slack is pulled out and the chain is tight. Do this at the reference mark, or very close.
Now measure the distance between your reference mark and the (snug/tight) chain. Make a note of this distance.
Using that distance, cut a piece of dowel rod or a small wooden block , metal or something, to this exact distance. This will be your chain tension/slack verification gauge for future checks and adjustments. It avoids all the hassles, giving your test dummy time to make a beer run!
Keep the little gauge in the bike tool kit for quick trail-side re-checks and adjustments.
After you do this several times you should be able to "eyeball" that distance and not even use the block..."close enough".

This is not rocket surgery or brain science and is truly one of those things where "close enough" really is "good enough".

But do remain mindful of a few important points:
*Check adjustment more often when the chain and or sprocket are new. Or worn. That is when they are wearing the fastest.
*Every chain/sprocket will develop tight spots & loose spots from wear, over time. Keep this in mind for future adjustments. Check the gap at one spot on the chain, then rotate the wheel/chain 180 deg. and re-measure. If they are the same, you're gold! If not, re-adjust using the tightest spot for reference.
* Except when installing a new chain and/or sprocket, you should be able to just rely on your gauge/block. "Quickies" are good!
*Do your best to keep the rear wheel in alignment with the center-line of the bike. Consider "snail" adjuster marks as "suggestions" not "TRVTH"...they are not that accurate. If they are off significantly, it will cause "rubbing" a long shiny place on one side or the other on the rear sprocket, along the outer edge & teeth. This will cause premature wear of both chain & sprocket. Another tell-tale of mis-alignment is sighting along the edge of the chain. It will be easy to spot if the chain & sprocket are "cocked" one way or the other.
*It is also important to keep chain & sprocket clean & lubed. If you are going for a ride and don't have time to do both, at least lube it extra well. If your chain appears dry...it is. Water, sand & mud will wash & scrub lubricant out & off.
*Chain lube...yes! Any good brand is "OK", but... I've used Silkolene ProChain Synthetic for years and really believe in it. It goes on water-thin so it really gets down inside the chain. It quickly "sets" to a thick, tacky consistency and good for O-rings. It does not fling off. Much better than 140 wt. gear oil. We used it exclusively on our Bonneville Land Speed race bikes...from the little 130 MPH vintage hot rods to the big 550 HP dual-engine 262 MPH monster! A good chain lube is much cheaper than new chain & sprockets. And lasts a long time if not over-used.
* A loose chain is a happy chain! (Not too loose) Much better a little loose than a little tight...


Damn, I got carried away with this...sorry 'bout that! :sour:
Hopefully some of it will be useful.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
Correctimundo!

And here's a good "upgrade" to the procedure:
After you measure & adjust to get the slack just where you want it, have your "test dummy" get off the bike. (Do not move the bike or rear wheel forward or back.
Then pick a point, ~mid-point along the top of the swing arm. Mark this point with a Magic Marker, piece of tape or something similar. Ideally, this will be a permanent mark for future use. A small scribe or punch mark in the paint is perfect.
Using your finger or thumb, lift up on the top run of the chain until all the slack is pulled out and the chain is tight. Do this at the reference mark, or very close.
Now measure the distance between your reference mark and the (snug/tight) chain. Make a note of this distance.
Using that distance, cut a piece of dowel rod or a small wooden block , metal or something, to this exact distance. This will be your chain tension/slack verification gauge for future checks and adjustments. It avoids all the hassles, giving your test dummy time to make a beer run!
Keep the little gauge in the bike tool kit for quick trail-side re-checks and adjustments.
After you do this several times you should be able to "eyeball" that distance and not even use the block..."close enough".

This is not rocket surgery or brain science and is truly one of those things where "close enough" really is "good enough".

But do remain mindful of a few important points:
*Check adjustment more often when the chain and or sprocket are new. Or worn. That is when they are wearing the fastest.
*Every chain/sprocket will develop tight spots & loose spots from wear, over time. Keep this in mind for future adjustments. Check the gap at one spot on the chain, then rotate the wheel/chain 180 deg. and re-measure. If they are the same, you're gold! If not, re-adjust using the tightest spot for reference.
* Except when installing a new chain and/or sprocket, you should be able to just rely on your gauge/block. "Quickies" are good!
*Do your best to keep the rear wheel in alignment with the center-line of the bike. Consider "snail" adjuster marks as "suggestions" not "TRVTH"...they are not that accurate. If they are off significantly, it will cause "rubbing" a long shiny place on one side or the other on the rear sprocket, along the outer edge & teeth. This will cause premature wear of both chain & sprocket. Another tell-tale of mis-alignment is sighting along the edge of the chain. It will be easy to spot if the chain & sprocket are "cocked" one way or the other.
*It is also important to keep chain & sprocket clean & lubed. If you are going for a ride and don't have time to do both, at least lube it extra well. If your chain appears dry...it is. Water, sand & mud will wash & scrub lubricant out & off.
*Chain lube...yes! Any good brand is "OK", but... I've used Silkolene ProChain Synthetic for years and really believe in it. It goes on water-thin so it really gets down inside the chain. It quickly "sets" to a thick, tacky consistency and good for O-rings. It does not fling off. Much better than 140 wt. gear oil. We used it exclusively on our Bonneville Land Speed race bikes...from the little 130 MPH vintage hot rods to the big 550 HP dual-engine 262 MPH monster! A good chain lube is much cheaper than new chain & sprockets. And lasts a long time if not over-used.
* A loose chain is a happy chain! (Not too loose) Much better a little loose than a little tight...


Damn, I got carried away with this...sorry 'bout that! :sour:
Hopefully some of it will be useful.
WOW! I'm gonna have to write all that down. Thank you
I'm not sure I'm clear about the measurement method but that's prob because I do not have the bike in front of me. I'm sure that when I do it will come to me. Thanks again.
 

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PJ1 is the best chain lube in the world. Nobody should use any other chain lube in the world but PJ1. Everyone with a chain on their motorcycle should use PJ1.
Tell is how you really feel about PJ1!
 
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