TW200 Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
so I've done my due diligence & read all the old posts and seen hours of YouTube videos. so, any extra tips on getting the rear tire off the rim? I have to replace the tube. I popped it and then green slimed it and that was working so well I forgot to really fix it then i woke up one day & it was flat.... so I RE-green slimed it, pretty dumb but its holding for now. I've got my tire irons and a new tube, just need to get it done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
The easiest way for me was to take it to Firestone and ask one of the Techs to put it in the machine and break the bead. I tried doing it myself to no avail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,416 Posts
n2o2 has suggested the easiest way.



Seems like I have to change 2 or3 tires a season, so I bought a car and truck bead breaker from Harbor Freight.





http://www.harborfreight.com/bead-breaker-92961.html









Someone has previously posted how they made a giant lever from 2x4's to break the bead.



Jb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
May be a bit brutish but I start to pry down with the tool then step on the tire at the bead. Also make sure your tube is good and deflated. Especially with the tw. I use the step method with any tube tire change though and it usually works. I also have a good set of motion pro tire tools. Makes a difference. You may want to try and spray a little lube of sort to get it going. I've found any cheap car interior type stuff works as a good lubricant for getting them off and on. Hope you get it squared away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,223 Posts
My tire change consisted of a six foot long 2x4, a one foot long 2x4 wedge and the bumper of my truck. Worked great though. I tried my feet (250 pounds), tire irons, floor jack against truck bumper with tire in-between (all that happened was that I lifted my truck into the air with my TW tire and wheel between it), and finally the 2x4 lever method. If you don't have the tools, n2o2diver made a great suggestion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
[quote name='chainslap' date='15 May 2013 - 08:20 PM' timestamp='1368667231' post='76388']

May be a bit brutish but I start to pry down with the tool then step on the tire at the bead. Also make sure your tube is good and deflated. Especially with the tw. I use the step method with any tube tire change though and it usually works. I also have a good set of motion pro tire tools. Makes a difference. You may want to try and spray a little lube of sort to get it going. I've found any cheap car interior type stuff works as a good lubricant for getting them off and on. Hope you get it squared away.

[/quote0] +1. The right spoons makes the job a breeze.....well, less difficult anyway. Btw there's no rim locks on the

Tw so the job is easier than the youtube videos your watching.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
I just removed a rear tire a few days ago and here are the tools and some lessons I learned. Before I started I watched a bunch of YouTube vids which were mostly helpful. My TW is my first experience with motorcycle tire changes.



Tools used:

- GENSSI Motorcycle Tire Changer Assembly (same as Black Widow but red) - works great for the front and I was able to bread the bead of the rear but the bolt through the hub is too short.

- Tusk 17" Mega Tire Iron - awesome tire iron highly recommended

- 2 smaller 8" irons

- NoMar Yellow Thing - useful to have but not necessary

- Rim protectors



On my bike the front bead was easy to bread and changing the tire was pretty simple and straight forward. On the rear, the bead was much harder to break. Currently my rear wheel is completely disassembled to be painted so I can't comment on installing the rear tire yet. I need to pray to the truing gods that I can lace and true my wheel within specs first
. I will be using a Tusk Truing and Balance stand for this leg of the project.



Most helpful video I found:

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hul4lq0sZC8[/media]



Balancing:

If you would like to balance your wheels/tires and don't want to pay a shop or buy seldom used tools go with Dyna Beads. I used these on my Buell starting last year when I replaced the tires on that and they work awesome. I found a post somewhere online where a TW owner reported success with them using 2oz in the front tube and 3oz in the back. I currently have 2oz in my front on the TW and it was very smooth. My new front tire is an IRC GP-1 5.10. I was able to test drive it before tearing into my rear wheel. RockyMountainATV sells a kit with the installation bottle with 2oz and 3oz bag of beads which worked out perfect.



What not to do
:

I used the method shown in the video below to remove the tires from front and rear. Do not use this technique for the rear tire where you flip the wheel over and pull the tire over each side of the rim. It worked fine for the front but I could not flex the rear tire around the rim and ended up cutting the bead with tin snips and cutting the tire off. This tire was trash so it was an option for me.

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFg44gjjDLA[/media]





Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Have any of you had luck with the rear tire using the '3 spoons' method? I've not done a tire change on my TW yet, but looking at that rear wheel is more like looking at a car tire than a motorcycle tire. Is the rim a big pain in the butt to get the bead off of or it it no worse than any motor motorcycle tire?



I'm thinking of ordering in a set of the steet style TW2xx tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,431 Posts
I find the three spoon method for breaking the bead to be easy, it works great for me. Just take your time and get little bites. If you are sweating, throwing tools and cursing, you are doing it wrong
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,416 Posts
Have any of you had luck with the rear tire using the '3 spoons' method? I've not done a tire change on my TW yet, but looking at that rear wheel is more like looking at a car tire than a motorcycle tire. Is the rim a big pain in the butt to get the bead off of or it it no worse than any motor motorcycle tire?
The hardest part of the tire change is breaking the bead.



Once that is done, the rest is like any other tire... 3 tire spoons and plenty of lubricant.















Jb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
I find the three spoon method for breaking the bead to be easy, it works great for me. Just take your time and get little bites. If you are sweating, throwing tools and cursing, you are doing it wrong
Next time you do it can you make a video? I am obviously doing it wrong! I'm drenched in sweat, all my tools are gone and the neighbors are about to call the cops!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,431 Posts
Haha, I've been there! Just take your time, work all the way around a time or two, use GOOD lube, (Ru-Glyde) It's really not that hard. If I can do it, you can do it better
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
I made my tire changing stand out of a 14" car rim thinking I'd never own a motorcycle with smaller than a 16" wheel. Oops!



Here it is in all its glory.. The funny thing is that I've never used it because I find that I'd rather throw down a piece of carpet and wrestle tires on the ground. I'm kind of an idiot. If any of you want to make one of these, it's a pretty simple device... I might need it if I ever own a bike with big tires like a goldwing or whatever. But dirt bikes and everything else are doable with spoons and wrasslin around on flat ground.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FaL0kqekbE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,416 Posts
I made my tire changing stand out of a 14" car rim thinking I'd never own a motorcycle with smaller than 16"...
Nice work, Silverhead.



You do need a bigger garage.




Jb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
had no bead breaking tool, didn't break the bead. I'm also pretty sore now. taking the tire to the shop! I learned a lot about my rear tire though. I never took it off myself before, and I got a chain lube in and cleaned my rear brake a little.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top