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Since I have been reading this forum there has been a steady stream of postings about highway cruising on a TW.



I find most of those postings pushing the credibility boundaries pretty hard. Claims of cruising at 70 mph on a 200 cc engine are just a bit over the top.



I wonder if a normal cruising speed of say 45- 50 mph is not more accurate.



If you want to go fast you need more engine - say at least 350ccs for posted highway speeds and 500+ ccs for speeds regularly exceeding posted speed limits.



I know small engined motorcycles can run fast - look at the 50 and 125 cc Kriedlers in Grand Prix racing - but those were highly stressed and very fragile engines turning thousand and thousands of rpms.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kreidler



So what say you - more realistic speeds for cruising on a TW?
 

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I find the most comfortable cruising speed is right around 45 to 50 mph. Any higher and it gets a bit stressful. Lucky for me the 55 mph roads around me are quiet enough that I don't get passed that often, but if I wanted to do any long distance cruising I would be looking for more cc's.
 

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The 70 MPH claims are probably from smaller riders. I am 6'3" 250LB rider. I can cruise at 60 MPH on a flat road with no wind. If there is a head wind of 20 MPH then I am slowed to around 50. On a downhill stretch with a tail wind I can go 75 MPH if I lay down on the tank and hold my breath. I quit doing this when a dog came out after me. When I swerved (this was at night) I saw the deer standing in the road as it's head hit my mirror. I matured alot that night. I prefer trying to get higher Miles Per Gallon than Miles Per Hour lately since the price of gas is going up.
 

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I can't really challenge anyone else's claim of cruising at high speed, but I can say, I have a hard time just reaching 70mph let alone maintaining it for crusing. When traveling on 55mph posted roads, I generally can maintain 55-60mph comfortably, though this speed is affected by hill/incline and wind. Also, without hills or wind I can go and maintain 65mph, but the fun factor is lost for me on the TW at anything over 60mph. Luckily for me, like csdave I have plenty of lower posted speed backroads.





As a side note, I've thought about getting a slightly larger dualpurpose like a WR250R, which I really like, but the Finance Minister vetoed this. Not on the grounds of finances, apparently she still loves me
and doesn't like me riding on the tar roads (and for some reason, riding alone on sandy dry creekbeds - oops!) I told here Georgie was with me, but she said that don't count
.
 

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For me 55 is a reasonable AVERAGE (The acronym "YMMV" was probably coined by a sub-250cc rider.
)



Yes, it'll do a real (GPS) 65 occasionally (maybe even for several miles if the stars align) but not as a average.



Geography, climate, rider weight and physical size, modifications and state of tune all conspire to make such things predictable only on an individual basis with so little torque and horsepower to work with. Physics iz physics.



Fuel mileage can also be as high as 80mpg or as low as 40mpg with the simple variable of a crosswind, headwind or major elevation change.



All else being equal, with stock gearing and tires installed on my own bike my wife is capable of at least a 5 mph greater AVERAGE speed and a 5-10 mpg increase in mileage. The weight difference between us is 60 pounds, my bike probably outweighs hers by as much as 40 pounds with a full tank and she presents much less frontal area.
 

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Im 5'6" and 150lbs and i am comfortable riding 55-62mph which is enough for me. Will a tw run 65-70 all day on flat ground im sure of it but it wouldnt cruising "more like WFO." A friend of mine has a stock aprilia 2 stroke 50cc scooter that will run a little over 55mph on flat ground.
 

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This has been pretty well beat to death, but here's my real world data: In my short commute my 05 & 10 (both stock) have no problem getting to 65, but 70 takes wind at my back or some downhill. I'm sure I could get either to 70 if I had longer straights to work with. Daily, I make a right turn onto a street with cars moving UPHILL at 55. I hit 5th at 50, and I can hit 60 by the time I get to the top of that hill... about a 1/2 mile total distance. I regularly travel on that road at 60-65 because that's what everyone else is doing, and I feel as secure as I can... with 50 cars around me.



With that said, I still would not consider the TW a freeway commuter (here in CA) because there is no more top end left at those speeds without time to ramp it up, and even then its just a few MPH.



I think most people that feel they can cruise on the freeways at 70 have done some sprocket modifications to get more top end.



I'm am pretty light, at 165lb with a 5'11" frame, so that probably is a factor.
 

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...not a TW200 owner yet...so reading this I'm getting some questions in my head...



Is the problem with max speed a engine/gear ratio problem...where the bike is at it's max power and turning the gears as much as it can?



or is the problem more related to the stability of the bike at speeds over 60mph?



...I only ask because if it was more of a stability issue it seems that some smoother tires (Shinko's maybe) would take some of the shimmy out of the ride...and maybe leaning over and putting the feet on the passenger pegs?





dunno...just thinking by typing I guess
 

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My Stats: 6' tall @ 185lbs.



With a 14 tooth front sprocket and 45 tooth rear, I can always maintain ~65 mph in 4th gear. Change into 5th and I can usually maintain that speed and hit a top speed of 80 mph on flat ground when conditions are right.



I like to think of it as the "small displacement speed gamble". If you have any condition that is not perfect, you won't hit your top speed. What factors influence top speed?



1. Elevation (and possibly in my case humidity)

2. Wind

3. Incline



At 300' above sea level I can maintain 75 mph. At 1000' above sea level I can only maintain 65 mph.

With a head wind or side wind, I can only maintain 65 mph.

With the maximum inclines you get in Ontario, I can only maintain 65 mph.



And I don't believe that weight or height makes much of a difference. I have tried the ninja tuck and standing on pegs at 65 mph: no difference. I have also loaded 60lbs of gear on the bike: no difference (however, 2-up does make a difference!)
 

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Just got in from riding about 60 miles- toped out at 62mph and had nothing left. It was a bit windy. Its funny, at 55-60 mph you twist the throttle and think "I can do 70 easy" but alas at 62 mph you realize nope.



I'm 5' 10" 200lbs.



It isn't a stability issue, at least not on mine (some have reported a little speed wobble). These bikes are geared low. And fun.



My TDub is happiest at 55mph. It can hold 50 uphill no problem.
 

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I envy you guys down there with some real atmosphere. We lose quite a bit of power riding here above 5,000 feet. This is especially noticeable on the smaller cc bikes. I've seen many of you have ridden your TWs at higher elevations, including here in Colorado. Riding near the top of Pikes Peak around 13,000' plus really dragged down one of my 400cc bikes on a ride last year, but I haven't attempted it on a TW...yet. Veering back onto topic, I normally prefer riding the TW in the 45-55 range.
 

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I don't think it's a stability problem, so long as you realize you are driving like a mad man and anything can happen when you're trying to be the "Worlds Fastest TW," which is what it can feel like at times (good side gust). Anywho, I'd go along with you are basically at the engine's max output, which is why we are left playing with sprocket ratios.



I sure hope it's true that you can run at that RPM all day, like some out here say, because sometimes I think I'm betting my life on the concept.



Every intersection is a race... I heard that somewhere out here. I need to be in third before I clear good sized intersection around here. You don't ride this bike like a cruiser, that's for sure
 

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What I love about this size bike is it keeps you out of trouble most the times with cops. My bigger bike it is so easy to want to "push it". I still get a great feeling riding this size of bike and feel like I get good performance without attracting negative attention.
 

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I feel ya on that one. If im on the sv i find myself on one wheel or wanting to cruise a buck ten. It has gotten a little better since with age but that urge is still there!
 

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Tdub has no trouble maintaining the 55mph speed limit on the roads through the Ozarks and Smokies. Maintaining 70mph on the interstate getting there takes some effort--tuck, toes on passenger pegs, taking advantage of faster vehicles to block the wind, etc. In city traffic, even with a headwind, if enough vehicles are close enough together they carry a bubble of air down the highway with them, and it is surprisingly easy to maintain high speeds.



13,000+ feet of altitude on Pike's Peak, WFO in 2nd gear was 24mph.



Some of the uphills on Cherohala Skyway, WFO in 3rd was 35mph.



CR124 to St. Elmo in Colorado, WFO 28mph on some hills.



The TW's torque curve is so flat that changing sprocket ratios has very little effect on top speed 99.9% of the time.



Fuel quality can make a 5-6mph difference in top speed under identical conditions.



Carb tune can make a 5-6mph difference in top speed under identical conditions.



Condition of spark plug can make a 5-6mph difference in top speed under identical conditions.



Condition of air filter can make a 5-6mph difference in top speed under identical conditions.



Condition of chain and sprockets can make a 5-6mph difference in top speed under identical conditions.



If you want to sit on your ass and make no more effort than twisting the throttle, you'll need a bigger bike to cruise interstate speeds in Barcolounger comfort. I find it more fun to ride a slow bike fast than ride a fast bike slow, but to each his own.
 

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I find it more fun to ride a slow bike fast than ride a fast bike slow, but to each his own.




You summed it up for me and I didn't quite know how to put it. Main reason I got this bike is for the slower areas in town and to work. On my faster bike it was always frustrating.
 

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Frustrating is a good way to put it.
 

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This subject is one the rare ones that finds me envying flatlanders.



YMMV.
 

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We have two dubs.. Have had them for 6 years now.. 55/60 is about as fast as we like to go... 45 is a breeze on the back roads around here.. I didn't buy them for speed, but for long relaxing"slow" runs on the less traveled roads.. If we want speed we take out the bigger stable mates. OMM.
 
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