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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,
My TW is an 18 with about 1200 miles, I am it's first owner and have been using Yamalube 10w 40 dino oil. When I let the bike sit for a day or 2 my clutch is a tad sticky, it will die if I just put in gear without first breaking the clutch free; then it's fine and acts normally. I have had old bikes before and assumed this is normal, now I am wondering if it really is. I understand a stuck clutch is normal after sitting for a month, year, etc but 1 day doesn't seem like much. Anyone have any thoughts here? Am I missing something obvious?
 

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mine did that often when cold and using dino oil. Switched to synthetic at about 1600 miles. Still does this sometimes if cold and try and start in 1st with clutch pulled. So I think it's normal - I'm at 10,000 care free miles now. Start in neutral, rev a little and problem solved. welcome to the forum
 

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Thanks for the reply. I typically start and let idle for 2 minutes, pretty predictably. So at 2 minutes the jug is warm to the touch and the rest of the engine is cold. It starts to shift easily within about the first 1/4 mile of riding slowly. Which synthetic oil did you switch to?
 

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Perfectly normal. Change to Mobil 1 4T Racing 10W40 at 1500 miles and the issue will pretty much disappear. There is no need to idle the TW like that; as soon as it takes throttle without bogging (~30 sec.) you can ride it away. Just don't rev it to redline until a couple minutes of riding.
 

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This seems to be a much more common complaint on late model TW's. Yamaha changed the clutch plate design a couple years ago (they have this odd oblong shape, not perfectly round as you'd expect) and since then complaints of sticky/clunky/lurchy clutches have been pretty common. The new part has superceded the old one, so even if you order OEM clutch plates for say a 2000's bike, you'll get the new ones. There was a thread somewhere with pictures comparing the difference and a response from Yamaha that the new design was supposedly for improved oil flow to the clutch. But complaints of crappy, clunky, sticky clutches was essentially unheard of until the last year or two.

It's also somewhat common an issue on new bikes of any size/type, but usually takes care of itself pretty quickly. My Scout did it pretty badly for maybe the first 100-200 miles or so. Very very clunky and would almost always stall the engine when cold. After a few hundred miles it was drastically improved and actually became quite smooth, stalling became a complete non-issue. Having your bike stall when you click it into gear should not be considered normal, even in cold weather and regardless of what oil you use. After an extended storage yeah the first time it might stick a little but beyond that, no, not normal.
 

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If I put the bike in first gear, engine off, pull the clutch in, and start pushing it around the parking lot I feel a little bit of resistance. Is that normal? Or do I need to adjust something?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok. So this might be caused by a new clutch plate design and maybe not. Switching to synthetic might help. Has anyone switched to synthetic and had the problem persist? I have always considered it normal, my first bike was a Norton and it was always sticking after sitting a few days. Now that I am considering selling the tw I am not sure I could convince a newb that sometimes wet clutches stick when cold.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for the thoughts and input. I put it all together: I did my typical brief warm up, then pulled the clutch lever in and blipped the throttle twice while keeping the clutch pulled, then shifted into first with almost no engine hesitation.
 

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Not a bad idea to let an air-cooled single warm up a bit before hitting the road. Check the tire pressures and chain slack and other important pre-ride checklist stuff while it warms up a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The warm up:. An old time bike mechanic recommended letting a cold air cooled bike warm up briefly, until the jug is warm. Obviously an excessive warm up is a bad idea. I find that if I start it on a track stand, do a quick walk around visual inspection, put on helmet, gloves, roll bike off track stand, get on - this all takes about 2 minutes and the jug is warm and not too hot to touch.
 
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