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so after cleaning my air filter for the first time tonight, I notice that the filter and location seem really restrictive. I am just wondering if anyone has done any mods to provide more air into the carb. Seems to me you could almost ditch the hole box and put a simple k&n style filter on it and give the motor a little more air....has anyone done this? or at least noticed the same thing? After taking the side cover off, I wondered how air even got into the carb.. Seems ineffective to me!
 

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Personally Im not a big fan of K&N filters. The reason they flow and breath so well is because they sacrifice filtration. There are a million internet articles about filter comparisons out there. Just change your filter regularly and dont worry about it.
 

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+1 for TW Joe. I like to use 90 weight gear oil on the stock filter. Takes a bit of care to get it evenly distributed and not over oiled. Someday I'll break down and buy some UniFilter oil (nice'n sticky). I wonder if UniFilter makes a replacement for the stock filter ?
 

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An air filter for the TW is not listed in the Unifilter catalog.



jb


Buy the flat filter material from Uni and cut your own.



To get more flow out of the stock filter use mineral oil or ATF instead of motor oil. In my experience the thinner oil actually captures MORE crap than either motor oil or filter-specific oil, without choking the motor, and it's easier to clean.



With any oil up to say 40WT it's pretty hard to over-oil a filter. Engine heat will eventually cause the excess to drain to the airbox drain within a few miles.
 

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Buy the flat filter material from Uni and cut your own....
Thanks, lizrdbrth. I didn't realize the filter material is available by itself.



jb
 

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Hey!



While this topic is hot, I recently wondered if K&N filter oil is ok for the TW foam filter and if it would "grab" enough particulate??



any thoughts are great appreciated...I have a freshly cleaned filter oiled with K&N oil ready to go - I'm just a bit cautious to install it


-Adam
 

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Ok you asked, I prefer heavier stickier oil. I have been told specifically not to use K&N oil on foam filters as it is too light. I have used all kinds of oil on these over the years and

I like 90wt gear oil best as it is kinda sticky like UniFilter oil. But you must be careful not to use to much and work it in evenly. I started using the 90wt as I have a bottle of it that is too old for gears and didn't know what to do with it. Works great. JMHO
 

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Alright. I currently use the BelRay blue, super sticky stuff in a bottle. I dread my air filter maintenance, due to this stuff. I'd like to find some that is applied from a spray can, but yet still maintains some tackyness. I do agree, in that the K&N oil sure seems wayyy light.



I had a Yamaha shop here locally oil a new filter I bought from them. He disappeared in the back and reappeared in like 20 seconds, with the element evenly oiled. It was light weight, yet had tiny strings of oil stretching from my finger tips to the filter - which is good! I wonder what they use.....



thanks guys.
 

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Yamaha Yamalube Biodegradable Air Filter Oil. Expensive, but environmentally friendly and VERY sticky. Put a bit in a big Ziploc baggy, as the clean, dry filter, and squish it around. A gallon size Ziploc is big enough to squeeze out the excess without wasting any oil. Zip the bag shut and save the squeezings for the next filter cleaning session.



The airbox is designed to reduce intake noise and to keep the intake high and dry during water crossings. Therefore, it is somewhat restrictive.



One way to reduce restriction is to drill holes in the plastic cover that is removed to service the air filter. Expect the engine to run with a leaner mixture and to generate more intake noise. The lean mixture is easily rectified by careful carb tuning, but you'll just have to live with the noise. One problem with a drilled airbox cover is that you'll loose nearly a foot of depth capability in water crossings. Water ingestion is not good for an engine. The plastic side cover will provide adequate protection from splashing in shallow crossings and in rain, though. One can carry waterproof tape and in case of a deep crossing simply tape over the holes. After crossing remove the tape to restore the benefits of the ventilated airbox cover. Also, one can extend the altitude range of good engine tune by drilling the airbox cover, then taping the holes at lower altitudes. Once riden high enough the bike starts running rich, remove the tape to lean the mixture and restore good performance. When returning to lower altitudes and the bike starts running lean, retape the holes to richen the mixture. If a holy airbox cover bothers you a new one can be ordered for about $35.



When I get around to building a 276cc TW with a 6-speed trans I will design and build an aluminum airbox that will flow much better than stock. All I have to do is win the lottery so I can afford the build.
 
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