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Discussion Starter #1
So this happens to me a lot, it seems. I was taking the gas tank off a few weeks back with a socket wrench when the head of the bolt just snapped clean off! I've tried making a screwhead out of what's in that little shaft, lube, extreme head. No dice.



Now I can live with that one for now. The tank stays on just fine without it.



But just now I was trying to get the front sprocket cover off and started stripping heads.



I'm so *%*#$%(#@#$ tired of this. I've never once had a screw extractor do its job. I've had them break often, though.



How about those helicoil things? Would they be useful?
 

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So this happens to me a lot, it seems. I was taking the gas tank off a few weeks back with a socket wrench when the head of the bolt just snapped clean off! I've tried making a screwhead out of what's in that little shaft, lube, extreme head. No dice.



Now I can live with that one for now. The tank stays on just fine without it.



But just now I was trying to get the front sprocket cover off and started stripping heads.



I'm so *%*#$%(#@#$ tired of this. I've never once had a screw extractor do its job. I've had them break often, though.



How about those helicoil things? Would they be useful?
Rightie Tightie; Lefty Loosey. Got it. Tom
 

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The only thing that has ever worked for me is drilling the broken screw with reverse rotation, or "left hand" drills. The key is to drill a pilot hole as close as possible to the center because sometimes you need to remove a lot of material before the screw will come loose. It feels great when it reaches the point when the drill grabs the screw and it backs right out.



an example:

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT?PMPXNO=2132096&PMT4NO=90987182



Oh and good penetrating oil. I like Kroil.



Mark
 

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my gas tank bolt snapped in half about 6 months ago. i was able to get the nub out with a left handed drill bit.



i replaced the bolt with a cap screw from lowes. good luck. i freaked out when it happened, but mine came out very easily. it was not very tight at all when it broke.
 

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Certainly is a frustrating situation and one I suspect, most of us have had to deal with.



You need to be certain you turn in the correct direction. Simple, you say; my reply is, not so. Many of us get a bit befuddled when looking at things backwards or upside down. Take a moment and be "clear", counter clockwise is un-tightening and clockwise is tightening. "righty tighty, lefty loosey" as was presented by Tom.



The smaller the nut or bolt, likely the effort applied to tightening is much reduced. This bolt can be tighten with more effort than this bolt. I do not want to make a fool of anyone, but since I had problems with this many years ago, I thought this may help. Tobacco had a good suggestion as well; make sure you are using a 'good' and the correct size of socket. As for the case, drill off the bolt head, undo the other bolts (properly), remove the case cover and grab the problem bolt (stub) with a vicegrip and remove. If it were me, I would re-tap the hole the next size (metric or SAE) then paint that bolt RED to remind me I need a different socket. Only MY opinions, good luck, I have done it more than once......... Gerry
 

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I'm a big fan of anti-seize. When I first removed my spark arrester I replaces the phillips head bolt with an allen and used some anti-seize on the bolt and the contact area of the spark arrester. I usually dab a SMALL amount on any bolt that I know that I'm going to remove in the future during a normal service: Oil filter covers, valve covers, seat bolts, tank bolts. I would never used it on anything that needs locktite or any engine bolts not normally removed occasionally.
 

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i've also noticed the screw heads on this bike are butter soft. i now use a small set of vice grips to break all screws that i can, then i replace them with cap screws.



edit: i meant viSe grips. someday i'll stop doing that
 

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So this happens to me a lot, it seems. I was taking the gas tank off a few weeks back with a socket wrench when the head of the bolt just snapped clean off! I've tried making a screwhead out of what's in that little shaft, lube, extreme head. No dice.



Now I can live with that one for now. The tank stays on just fine without it.



But just now I was trying to get the front sprocket cover off and started stripping heads.



I'm so *%*#$%(#@#$ tired of this. I've never once had a screw extractor do its job. I've had them break often, though.



How about those helicoil things? Would they be useful?
Helicoil works fine . One thing that is very useful and stopps the stripped heads is a hand impact wrench.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_driver
 

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Dealership stripped all of my screws out for me. Had to have the brother use his cut off wheel to slot the heads to get them out. Luckily none of the heads broke off.
 

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Snap-On 3/8-inch hand impact driver. Part number PIT120. Buy a bit adapter and extra bits to go with it. Works so well it's almost miraculous.



Once you get the stock screws out, replace them with stainless allen heads installed with a torque wrench.
 

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when fixing a leaky gasket for me, one of the bolts stripped out and boy was i worried, i ended up breaking one cheap set of damaged screw remover made for smaller bolts but got one thats a tapered 6 sided reverse pattern and did a hand style impacting pattern (much like the tool recommended previously although i used a pair of vicegrips on the shaft of the remover and applied pressure left, tapping repeatedly the end of the remover with a hammer to cause it to bite in and loosen in the threads simultaneously, just use a light-medium hand pressure no drills with removers and the hitting or impacting quality is really the key, i tried using the remover and just trying to hand turn or especially using a drill just would strip it more, hope that helps
 

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Snap-On 3/8-inch hand impact driver. Part number PIT120. Buy a bit adapter and extra bits to go with it. Works so well it's almost miraculous.



Once you get the stock screws out, replace them with stainless allen heads installed with a torque wrench.


+1, although does't have to be a SO. My $13 generic brand works wonders too.
 

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I'm a big fan of anti-seize. When I first removed my spark arrester I replaces the phillips head bolt with an allen and used some anti-seize on the bolt and the contact area of the spark arrester. I usually dab a SMALL amount on any bolt that I know that I'm going to remove in the future during a normal service: Oil filter covers, valve covers, seat bolts, tank bolts. I would never used it on anything that needs locktite or any engine bolts not normally removed occasionally.


+1 on antisieze.



An old aircraft mechanic's tip is to use Phillip's Milk of Magnesia as antisieze. Less mess, less slippery and still slows electrolysis. I use it on side cover bolts and engine parts, etc., and commercial antisieze for chassis bolts or anything else not in need of Loctite.



Folks will prolly dispute this, but stainless relacement bolts come with their own set of downsides. IMO if you're gunna use them, antisieze them, and antisieze them with a magesium-based (rather than aluminum) product.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Speaking of the stainless replacements, are the case cover screws also included in those kits?



I'll do it all the right way. That milk of magnesia is a good idea. When I put stuff back together I usually try to ensure it won't happen again. I like vaseline on one side of a gasket to keep them intact when removing. Even if I'm replacing it, I've found it saves some mess, helps seal and whatnot.
 

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+1, although does't have to be a SO. My $13 generic brand works wonders too.


My Skill cordless drill has slip clutch settings for screws. It's nowhere near as heavy duty as even my cheap chinese Harbor Freight impact driver but it does bump like one. I've used it often to back stubborn rusted screws out.



Just shows that it is the repetitive persistent impact that does the job.
 

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+1, although does't have to be a SO. My $13 generic brand works wonders too.


I have 3 hand impacts, the Snap-On, a Craftsman, and a generic off eBay. They all work, but the Snap-On by far feels better. It is smaller, 3/8-inch drive instead of 1/2-inch drive like the other two. Because it is smaller, the Snap-On is lighter and easier to use. It has a lot less slop in the mechanism, too. I can't say it works any better, but it does feel better and inspires more confidence.
 

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I have 3 hand impacts, the Snap-On, a Craftsman, and a generic off eBay. They all work, but the Snap-On by far feels better. It is smaller, 3/8-inch drive instead of 1/2-inch drive like the other two. Because it is smaller, the Snap-On is lighter and easier to use. It has a lot less slop in the mechanism, too. I can't say it works any better, but it does feel better and inspires more confidence.


Qwerty, per your suggestion, I just purchased the Snap-on PIT-120 'set' on E-Bay. Price was $92 but sounds to be well worth it. I have an 1/2" Craftsman, but I don't find it an easy tool to set or use. Thanks, Gerry
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I just purchased a cheap one from harbor freight. I figured a 1/4" drive would be ideal for my big hands. It got good reviews compared to the other one they had, so maybe it'll do the job.



The day I can afford snap-on tools is the day I buy you guys drinks.
 

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I just purchased a cheap one from harbor freight. I figured a 1/4" drive would be ideal for my big hands. It got good reviews compared to the other one they had, so maybe it'll do the job.



The day I can afford snap-on tools is the day I buy you guys drinks.


I learned long ago that cheap tools are penny wise and pound foolish.
 
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